182

Image following test case:

it('valid emails checks', () => {
  ['[email protected]', '[email protected]'/*, ...*/].map(mail => {
    expect(isValid(mail)).toBe(true);
  });
});

I would like to add auto-generated message for each email like Email '[email protected]' should be valid so that it's easy to find failing test cases.

Something like:

// .map(email =>
expect(isValid(email), `Email ${email} should be valid`).toBe(true);

Is it possible in Jest ?

In Chai it was possible to do with second parameter like expect(value, 'custom fail message').to.be... and in Jasmine seems like it's done with .because clause. But cannot find solution in Jest.

14 Answers 14

85

You try this lib that extends jest: https://github.com/mattphillips/jest-expect-message

test('returns 2 when adding 1 and 1', () => {
  expect(1 + 1, 'Woah this should be 2!').toBe(3);
});
10
  • 1
    This does not seem to be accurate with TS
    – coler-j
    Commented Oct 23, 2020 at 15:15
  • 2
    I am using this library with typescript and it works flawlessly Commented Mar 14, 2021 at 1:19
  • 3
    @Marc Make sure you have followed the Setup instructions for jest-expect-message. Jest needs to be configured to use that module.
    – cybersam
    Commented Apr 28, 2021 at 18:32
  • 7
    To work with typescript, make sure to also install the corresponding types npm i jest-expect-message @types/jest-expect-message
    – PencilBow
    Commented Oct 19, 2021 at 11:17
  • 4
    Doesn't work with jest 27+. There is an open issue though.
    – Neeraj
    Commented Nov 9, 2021 at 10:59
61

I don't think it's possible to provide a message like that. But you could define your own matcher.

For example you could create a toBeValid(validator) matcher:

expect.extend({
  toBeValid(received, validator) {
    if (validator(received)) {
      return {
        message: () => `Email ${received} should NOT be valid`,
        pass: true
      };
    } else {
      return {
        message: () => `Email ${received} should be valid`,
        pass: false
      };
    }
  }
});

And then you use it like this:

expect(mail).toBeValid(isValid);

Note: toBeValid returns a message for both cases (success and failure), because it allows you to use .not. The test will fail with the corresponding message depending on whether you want it to pass the validation.

expect(mail).toBeValid(isValid);
// pass === true: Test passes
// pass === false: Failure: Email ... should be valid

expect(mail).not.toBeValid(isValid);
// pass === true: Failure: Email ... should NOT be valid
// pass === false: Test passes
3
  • That's great thanks, one question - when using this in some file, it's local for that test file right ? If I would like to have that function in some global should I use beforeAll then ?
    – Jurosh
    Commented Aug 16, 2017 at 19:00
  • 1
    I'm not entirely sure if it's only for the file, but if it's available throughout the test run, it probably depends on which file is executed first and when tests are run in parallel, that becomes a problem. But what you could do, is export the toBeValid function in a helper file and import it and register it with expect.extend({ toBeValid }) wherever you need it. Commented Aug 16, 2017 at 19:51
  • 2
    Man, I'm not going to knock your answer, but I can't believe this is missing from jest matchers. This is a fundamental concept. Commented Aug 30, 2021 at 15:58
46

I did this in some code I was writing by putting my it blocks inside forEach.

By doing this, I was able to achieve a very good approximation of what you're describing.

Pros:

  • Excellent "native" error reports
  • Counts the assertion as its own test
  • No plugins needed.

Here's what your code would look like with my method:


// you can't nest "it" blocks within each other,
// so this needs to be inside a describe block. 
describe('valid emails checks', () => {
  ['[email protected]', '[email protected]'/*, ...*/].forEach(mail => {
    // here is where the magic happens
    it(`accepts ${mail} as a valid email`, () => {
      expect(isValid(mail)).toBe(true);
    })
  });
});

Errors then show up like this.

Notice how nice these are!

 FAIL  path/to/your.test.js
  ● valid emails checks › accepts [email protected] as a valid email

    expect(received).toBe(expected)

    Expected: "[email protected]"
    Received: "[email protected]"

      19 |    // here is where the magic happens
      20 |    it(`accepts ${mail} as a valid email`, () => {
    > 21 |      expect(isValid(mail)).toBe(true);
                                       ^
      22 |    })
5
  • 2
    How did the expected and received become the emails? isn't the expected supposed to be "true"? Commented Dec 28, 2021 at 16:02
  • 2
    Your solution is Josh Kelly's one, with inappropriate syntax. Use it.each(yourArray) instead (which is valid since early 2020 at least).
    – Mozgor
    Commented Mar 15, 2022 at 14:30
  • 1
    Thanks for your feedback Mozgor. Both approaches are valid and work just fine. The advantage of Josh Kelly's approach is that templating is easier with test.each. The advantage of my approach is that the code is much more flexible and intuitive. As a contrived example, each successive test's input can be derived based on the previous test, while still printing appropriate test failure messages. It's clean and workmanlike. I don't think 'inappropriate syntax' is a valid critique. Instead, we're just using a different approach with different pros and cons. There is no silver bullet. Commented Dec 1, 2022 at 21:02
  • 1
    As @ProblemsLoop pointed out, the Expected and Received examples don't make sense. All you get is Expected: true\nRecieved: false.
    – ericP
    Commented Mar 30, 2023 at 16:30
  • 1
    I like how flexible your approach is. It also works with nested "for ... of" loops.
    – dude
    Commented Apr 19 at 15:04
42

Although it's not a general solution, for the common case of wanting a custom exception message to distinguish items in a loop, you can instead use Jest's test.each.

For example, your sample code:

it('valid emails checks', () => {
  ['[email protected]', '[email protected]'/*, ...*/].map(mail => {
    expect(isValid(mail)).toBe(true);
  });
});

Could instead become

test.each(['[email protected]', '[email protected]'/*, ...*/])(
    'checks that email %s is valid',
    mail => {
        expect(isValid(mail)).toBe(true);
    }
);
0
19

You can use try-catch:

try {
    expect(methodThatReturnsBoolean(inputValue)).toBeTruthy();
}
catch (e) {
    throw new Error(`Something went wrong with value ${JSON.stringify(inputValue)}`, e);
}
3
  • 17
    This is solution is a bad idea, you can't make a difference when the tests failed because the return was false or methodThatReturnsBoolean thrown an exception.
    – dave008
    Commented Aug 30, 2019 at 3:01
  • 1
    @dave008, yes both cases fail the test, but the error message is very explanatory and dependent on what went wrong.
    – Mikk
    Commented Sep 1, 2019 at 16:14
  • @Marc you must have a problem with your code -- in the example there is only one parameter/value given to the expect function.
    – Mikk
    Commented Feb 17, 2021 at 17:20
9

Another way to add a custom error message is by using the fail() method:

it('valid emails checks', (done) => {
  ['[email protected]', '[email protected]'/*, ...*/].map(mail => {
    if (!isValid(mail)) {
      done.fail(`Email '${mail}' should be valid`)
    } else {
      done()
    }
  })
})
1
  • 1
    done cannot be used for async tests, it gives error: Test functions cannot both take a 'done' callback and return something. Either use a 'done' callback, or return a promise. Commented Mar 22, 2023 at 11:25
8

Just had to deal with this myself I think I'll make a PR to it possibly: But this could work with whatever you'd like. Basically, you make a custom method that allows the curried function to have a custom message as a third parameter.

It's important to remember that expect will set your first parameter (the one that goes into expect(akaThisThing) as the first parameter of your custom function.

For a generic Jest Message extender which can fit whatever Jest matching you'd already be able to use and then add a little bit of flourish:

expect.extend({
  toEqualMessage(received, expected, custom) {
    let pass = true;
    let message = '';
    try {
      // use the method from Jest that you want to extend
      // in a try block
      expect(received).toEqual(expected);
    } catch (e) {
      pass = false;
      message = `${e}\nCustom Message: ${custom}`;
    }
    return {
      pass,
      message: () => message,
      expected,
      received
    };
  }
});

declare global {
  // eslint-disable-next-line @typescript-eslint/no-namespace
  namespace jest {
    // eslint-disable-next-line @typescript-eslint/naming-convention
    interface Matchers<R> {
      toEqualMessage(a: unknown, b: string): R;
    }
  }
}

Will show up like:

    Error: expect(received).toEqual(expected) // deep equality

    Expected: 26
    Received: 13
    Custom Message: Sad Message Indicating failure :(

For specific look inside the expect(actualObject).toBe() in case that helps your use case:

import diff from 'jest-diff'

expect.extend({
toBeMessage (received, expected, msg) {
  const pass = expected === received
  const message = pass
? () => `${this.utils.matcherHint('.not.toBe')}\n\n` +
        `Expected value to not be (using ===):\n` +
        `  ${this.utils.printExpected(expected)}\n` +
        `Received:\n` +
        `  ${this.utils.printReceived(received)}`
      : () => {
        const diffString = diff(expected, received, {
          expand: this.expand
        })
        return `${this.utils.matcherHint('.toBe')}\n\n` +
        `Expected value to be (using ===):\n` +
        `  ${this.utils.printExpected(expected)}\n` +
        `Received:\n` +
        `  ${this.utils.printReceived(received)}` +
        `${(diffString ? `\n\nDifference:\n\n${diffString}` : '')}\n` +
        `${(msg ? `Custom:\n  ${msg}` : '')}`
      }

    return { actual: received, message, pass }
  }
})

// usage:
expect(myThing).toBeMessage(expectedArray, ' was not actually the expected array :(')

1
  • 1
    Great job; I added this to my setupTests.js for my Create-React-App created app and it solved all my troubles...
    – hbarck
    Commented Oct 21, 2018 at 12:11
2

I end up just testing the condition with logic and then using the fail() with a string template.

i.e.

it('key should not be found in object', () => {
    for (const key in object) {
      if (Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(object, key)) {
        const element = object[key];
        if (element["someKeyName"] === false) {
          if (someCheckerSet.includes(key) === false) {
            fail(`${key} was not found in someCheckerSet.`)
          }
        }
1
1

you can use this: (you can define it inside the test)

      expect.extend({
ToBeMatch(expect, toBe, Msg) {  //Msg is the message you pass as parameter
    const pass = expect === toBe;
    if(pass){//pass = true its ok
        return {
            pass: pass,
            message: () => 'No ERRORS ',
          };
    }else{//not pass
        return {
            pass: pass,
            message: () => 'Error in Field   '+Msg + '  expect  ' +  '  ('+expect+') ' + 'recived '+'('+toBe+')',
          };
    }
},  });

and use it like this

     let z = 'TheMassageYouWantWhenErrror';
    expect(first.name).ToBeMatch(second.name,z);
0
1

To expand on @Zargold's answer:

For more options like the comment below, see MatcherHintOptions doc

// custom matcher - omit expected
expect.extend({
  toBeAccessible(received) {
    if (pass) return { pass };
    return {
      pass,
      message: () =>
        `${this.utils.matcherHint('toBeAccessible', 'received', '', {
          comment: 'visible to screen readers',
        })}\n
Expected: ${this.utils.printExpected(true)}
Received: ${this.utils.printReceived(false)}`,
    };
  }

enter image description here

// custom matcher - include expected
expect.extend({
  toBeAccessible(received) {
    if (pass) return { pass };
    return {
      pass,
      message: () =>
        `${this.utils.matcherHint('toBeAccessible', 'received', 'expected', { // <--
          comment: 'visible to screen readers',
        })}\n
Expected: ${this.utils.printExpected(true)}
Received: ${this.utils.printReceived(false)}`,
    };
  }

enter image description here

1

Instead of using the value, I pass in a tuple with a descriptive label. For example, when asserting form validation state, I iterate over the labels I want to be marked as invalid like so:

errorFields.forEach((label) => {
  const field = getByLabelText(label);

  expect(field.getAttribute('aria-invalid')).toStrictEqual('true');
});

Which gives the following error message:

expect(received).toStrictEqual(expected) // deep equality

    - Expected  - 1
    + Received  + 1

      Array [
        "Day",
    -   "false",
    +   "true",
      ]
1

Following @Monarch Wadia answer I created this function which takes a data object and a callback containing tests and then iterates this callback for each object item.

function testDataSet(title, obj, func) {
  describe(title, () => {
    for (const k in obj) {
      test(`With data set: ${k}`, () => {
        func(obj[k]);
      });
    }
  });
}

Usage

testDataSet('My test case', { a: 'a1', b: 'b1' }, (data) => {
  expect(data).toEqual('a1');
});

Results

 FAIL  file.test.js
  My test case
    √ With data set: a (8 ms)
    × With data set: b (9 ms)

  ● My test case › With data set: b

    expect(received).toEqual(expected) // deep equality

    Expected: "a1"
    Received: "b1"

      102 |
      103 | testDataSet('My test case', { a: 'a1', b: 'b1' }, (data) => {
    > 104 |   expect(data).toEqual('a1');
          |                ^
      105 | });
      106 |
0

You can rewrite the expect assertion to use toThrow() or not.toThrow(). Then throw an Error with your custom text. jest will include the custom text in the output.

// Closure which returns function which may throw
function isValid (email) {
  return () => {
     // replace with a real test!
     if (email !== '[email protected]') {
       throw new Error(`Email ${email} not valid`)
     }
  }
}

expect(isValid(email)).not.toThrow()

0

I'm usually using something like

it('all numbers should be in the 0-60 or 180-360 range', async () => {
    const numbers = [0, 30, 180, 120];
    for (const number of numbers) {
        if ((number >= 0 && number <= 60) || (number >= 180 && number <= 360)) {
            console.log('All good');
        } else {
            expect(number).toBe('number between 0-60 or 180-360');
        }
    }
});

Generates: enter image description here

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