14

I was wondering if there is a simple way to add text labels with a contrasting background to an R plot using the base graphic system. Until now I have always used the rect() function together with graphics::strheight() and graphics::strwidth() to separately create the background box on which I then place my text using text():

# Prepare a noisy background:
plot(x = runif(1000), y = runif(1000), type = "p", pch = 16, col = "#40404050")

## Parameters for my text:
myText <- "some Text"
posCoordsVec <- c(0.5, 0.5)
cex <- 2

## Background rectangle: 
textHeight <- graphics::strheight(myText, cex = cex)
textWidth <- graphics::strwidth(myText, cex = cex)
pad <- textHeight*0.3
rect(xleft = posCoordsVec[1] - textWidth/2 - pad, 
        ybottom = posCoordsVec[2] - textHeight/2 - pad, 
        xright = posCoordsVec[1] + textWidth/2 + pad, 
        ytop = posCoordsVec[2] + textHeight/2 + pad,
        col = "lightblue", border = NA)

## Place text:
text(posCoordsVec[1], posCoordsVec[2], myText, cex = cex)

This is the result:

Text with background

This does the job but it is quite tedious and you run into trouble when you start using pos, adj, offset etc. to tweak the positioning of the text. I am aware of TeachingDemos::shadowtext() to make text stand out from the background but this adds an outline instead of a box.

I am looking for a simple way to create text with a background box, something like text(x, y, labels, bg = "grey20"). I can't be the first person to require such a functionality and I am probably just missing something obvious. Help is appreciated. Thanks

4 Answers 4

17

Base graphics

Using legend :

plot(x = runif(1000), y = runif(1000), type = "p", pch = 16, col = "#40404050")
legend(0.4, 0.5, "Some text", box.col = "lightblue", bg = "lightblue", adj = 0.2)

Output:

enter image description here ggplot2

With geom_label:

library(ggplot2)
df <- data.frame(x = runif(1000), y = runif(1000))
ggplot(data = df, aes(x = x , y = y))+ 
  geom_point(alpha = 0.2)+
  geom_label(aes(x = 0.5, y = 0.5, label = "Some text"), 
             fill = "lightblue", label.size = NA, size = 5)

Output: enter image description here

5
  • Thanks, ggplot does seem to provide the proper tools. I am looking for a solution using the base graphic system though.
    – ikop
    Jul 28, 2017 at 20:07
  • @ikop I included another solution using legend from the base graphics system.
    – mpalanco
    Jul 28, 2017 at 21:13
  • @mpalanco Is there a way to scale the box in base?
    – jay.sf
    Feb 11, 2019 at 15:29
  • 1
    @jay.sf Yes, using the argument cex, for instance: cex = 0.5
    – mpalanco
    Feb 11, 2019 at 16:24
  • You can also supply box.col = NA to turn off the box border Dec 21, 2021 at 4:31
11

Apparently, there does not seem to be a simple solution. So, I wrote my own function which does the job:

#' Add text with background box to a plot
#'
#' \code{boxtext} places a text given in the vector \code{labels} 
#' onto a plot in the base graphics system and places a coloured box behind 
#' it to make it stand out from the background.
#' 
#' @param x numeric vector of x-coordinates where the text labels should be 
#' written. If the length of \code{x} and \code{y} differs, the shorter one 
#' is recycled.
#' @param y numeric vector of y-coordinates where the text labels should be 
#' written. 
#' @param labels a character vector specifying the text to be written.
#' @param col.text the colour of the text 
#' @param col.bg color(s) to fill or shade the rectangle(s) with. The default 
#' \code{NA} means do not fill, i.e., draw transparent rectangles.
#' @param border.bg color(s) for rectangle border(s). The default \code{NA}
#' omits borders. 
#' @param adj one or two values in [0, 1] which specify the x (and optionally 
#' y) adjustment of the labels. 
#' @param pos a position specifier for the text. If specified this overrides 
#' any adj value given. Values of 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively indicate 
#' positions below, to the left of, above and to the right of the specified 
#' coordinates.
#' @param offset when \code{pos} is specified, this value gives the offset of 
#' the label from the specified coordinate in fractions of a character width.
#' @param padding factor used for the padding of the box around 
#' the text. Padding is specified in fractions of a character width. If a 
#' vector of length two is specified then different factors are used for the
#' padding in x- and y-direction.    
#' @param cex numeric character expansion factor; multiplied by 
#' code{par("cex")} yields the final character size. 
#' @param font the font to be used
#'
#' @return Returns the coordinates of the background rectangle(s). If 
#' multiple labels are placed in a vactor then the coordinates are returned
#' as a matrix with columns corresponding to xleft, xright, ybottom, ytop. 
#' If just one label is placed, the coordinates are returned as a vector.
#' @author Ian Kopacka
#' @examples
#' ## Create noisy background
#' plot(x = runif(1000), y = runif(1000), type = "p", pch = 16, 
#' col = "#40404060")
#' boxtext(x = 0.5, y = 0.5, labels = "some Text", col.bg = "#b2f4f480", 
#'     pos = 4, font = 2, cex = 1.3, padding = 1)
#' @export
boxtext <- function(x, y, labels = NA, col.text = NULL, col.bg = NA, 
        border.bg = NA, adj = NULL, pos = NULL, offset = 0.5, 
        padding = c(0.5, 0.5), cex = 1, font = graphics::par('font')){

    ## The Character expansion factro to be used:
    theCex <- graphics::par('cex')*cex

    ## Is y provided:
    if (missing(y)) y <- x

    ## Recycle coords if necessary:    
    if (length(x) != length(y)){
        lx <- length(x)
        ly <- length(y)
        if (lx > ly){
            y <- rep(y, ceiling(lx/ly))[1:lx]           
        } else {
            x <- rep(x, ceiling(ly/lx))[1:ly]
        }       
    }

    ## Width and height of text
    textHeight <- graphics::strheight(labels, cex = theCex, font = font)
    textWidth <- graphics::strwidth(labels, cex = theCex, font = font)

    ## Width of one character:
    charWidth <- graphics::strwidth("e", cex = theCex, font = font)

    ## Is 'adj' of length 1 or 2?
    if (!is.null(adj)){
        if (length(adj == 1)){
            adj <- c(adj[1], 0.5)            
        }        
    } else {
        adj <- c(0.5, 0.5)
    }

    ## Is 'pos' specified?
    if (!is.null(pos)){
        if (pos == 1){
            adj <- c(0.5, 1)
            offsetVec <- c(0, -offset*charWidth)
        } else if (pos == 2){
            adj <- c(1, 0.5)
            offsetVec <- c(-offset*charWidth, 0)
        } else if (pos == 3){
            adj <- c(0.5, 0)
            offsetVec <- c(0, offset*charWidth)
        } else if (pos == 4){
            adj <- c(0, 0.5)
            offsetVec <- c(offset*charWidth, 0)
        } else {
            stop('Invalid argument pos')
        }       
    } else {
      offsetVec <- c(0, 0)
    }

    ## Padding for boxes:
    if (length(padding) == 1){
        padding <- c(padding[1], padding[1])
    }

    ## Midpoints for text:
    xMid <- x + (-adj[1] + 1/2)*textWidth + offsetVec[1]
    yMid <- y + (-adj[2] + 1/2)*textHeight + offsetVec[2]

    ## Draw rectangles:
    rectWidth <- textWidth + 2*padding[1]*charWidth
    rectHeight <- textHeight + 2*padding[2]*charWidth    
    graphics::rect(xleft = xMid - rectWidth/2, 
            ybottom = yMid - rectHeight/2, 
            xright = xMid + rectWidth/2, 
            ytop = yMid + rectHeight/2,
            col = col.bg, border = border.bg)

    ## Place the text:
    graphics::text(xMid, yMid, labels, col = col.text, cex = theCex, font = font, 
            adj = c(0.5, 0.5))    

    ## Return value:
    if (length(xMid) == 1){
        invisible(c(xMid - rectWidth/2, xMid + rectWidth/2, yMid - rectHeight/2,
                        yMid + rectHeight/2))
    } else {
        invisible(cbind(xMid - rectWidth/2, xMid + rectWidth/2, yMid - rectHeight/2,
                        yMid + rectHeight/2))
    }    
}

This function allows me to add text to a plot with a background box while retaining most of the flexibility of the function text().

Example:

## Create noisy background:
plot(x = runif(1000), y = runif(1000), type = "p", pch = 16, col = "#40404060")
## Vector of labels, using argument 'pos' to position right of coordinates:
boxtext(x = c(0.3, 0.1), y = c(0.6, 0.1), labels = c("some Text", "something else"), 
        col.bg = "#b2f4f4c0", pos = 4, padding = 0.3)
## Tweak cex, font and adj:
boxtext(x = 0.2, y = 0.4, labels = "some big and bold text", 
        col.bg = "#b2f4f4c0", adj = c(0, 0.6), font = 2, cex = 1.8)

text with background using boxtext

1
  • 1
    Fails on plot( c(1,20), c(-0.2,0.2)); boxtext(10, -0.03, "text2", col.bg="cyan", border.bg="red"); the y-box is too high.
    – ivo Welch
    Jun 3, 2019 at 4:28
6

Quick hack using altcode character for a box:

plot(x=runif(1000), y=runif(1000), 
     type="p", pch=16, col="#40404050")

labels <- c("some text", "something else")

boxes <- sapply(nchar(labels), function(n) 
  paste(rep("█", n), collapse=""))

pos <- rbind(c(0.2, .1), c(.5, .5))
text(pos, labels=boxes, col="#CCCCCC99")
text(pos, labels=labels)
2
  • 3
    Nice hack, better to use unicode, though. Try paste(rep("\U2588", n), collapse="")
    – jay.sf
    Feb 11, 2019 at 14:58
  • only for monospace fonts and without line breaks
    – ivo Welch
    Jun 3, 2019 at 4:46
5

Bless your hardworking hearts, but plotrix has boxed.labels():

# Prepare a noisy background:
plot(x = runif(1000), y = runif(1000), type = "p", pch = 16, col = "#40404050")

## Parameters for my text:
myText <- "some Text"
posCoordsVec <- c(0.5, 0.5)
cex <- 2

## Background rectangle: 
textHeight <- graphics::strheight(myText, cex = cex)
textWidth <- graphics::strwidth(myText, cex = cex)
pad <- textHeight*0.3


## Place text:
plotrix::boxed.labels(posCoordsVec[1], posCoordsVec[2], myText, cex = cex, 
      border = NA, bg ="lightblue", xpad = 1.4, ypad = 1.4)

boxed.labels example

1
  • 1
    Very simplistic! The best solution so far in my opinion Oct 27, 2020 at 10:44

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