4

enter image description here

The above plot is made using seaborn in python. However, not sure why some of the legend circles are filled in with color and others are not. This is the colormap I am using:

sns.color_palette("Set2", 10)

g = sns.factorplot(x='month', y='vae_factor', hue='ad_name', col='crop', data=df_sub_panel,
                   col_wrap=3, size=5, lw=0.5, ci=None, capsize=.2, palette=sns.color_palette("Set2", 10),
                   sharex=False, aspect=.9, legend_out=False)
g.axes[0].legend(fancybox=None)

--EDIT:

Is there a way the circles can be filled? The reason they are not filled is that they might not have data in this particular plot

10
  • 1
    @ImportanceOfBeingErnest, I am using latest versions of both seaborn (0.8) and matpltolib (2.0)
    – user308827
    Commented Jul 28, 2017 at 19:43
  • 2
    What about test data?
    – Serenity
    Commented Jul 31, 2017 at 10:11
  • 8
    If you seriously want an answer, provide a minimal reproducible example. I.e. some example data with a code to run to reproduce this. When I'm plotting a factorplot with missing data, the legend does not have unfilled circles in it. Commented Jul 31, 2017 at 12:13
  • 2
    What's the point of having the absent variables in the legend? And, if you actually need them in the legend then isn't it a good distinction that they are not filled? They can be easily identified. Commented Jul 31, 2017 at 21:58
  • 5
    @user308827 This is impossible to reproduce without a working example
    – spacetyper
    Commented Aug 1, 2017 at 18:03

1 Answer 1

7
+200

The circles are not filled in when there is no data, as I think you've already deduced. But it can be forced by manipulating the legend object.

Full example:

import pandas as pd
import seaborn as sns

df_sub_panel = pd.DataFrame([
  {'month':'jan', 'vae_factor':50, 'ad_name':'China', 'crop':False},
  {'month':'feb', 'vae_factor':60, 'ad_name':'China', 'crop':False},
  {'month':'feb', 'vae_factor':None, 'ad_name':'Mexico', 'crop':False},
])

sns.color_palette("Set2", 10)

g = sns.factorplot(x='month', y='vae_factor', hue='ad_name', col='crop', data=df_sub_panel,
                   col_wrap=3, size=5, lw=0.5, ci=None, capsize=.2, palette=sns.color_palette("Set2", 10),
                   sharex=False, aspect=.9, legend_out=False)

# fill in empty legend handles (handles are empty when vae_factor is NaN)
for handle in g.axes[0].get_legend_handles_labels()[0]:
  if not handle.get_facecolors().any():
    handle.set_facecolor(handle.get_edgecolors())

legend = g.axes[0].legend(fancybox=None)

sns.plt.show()

The important part is the manipulation of the handle objects in legend at the end (in the for loop).

This will generate:

enter image description here

Compared to the original (without the for loop):

enter image description here

EDIT: Now less hacky thanks to suggestions from comments!

7
  • 1
    When there is no data, no circle is drawn. I think everyone here would benefit from a minimal reproducible example in the answer, even if the question refuses to provide one. Commented Aug 4, 2017 at 14:05
  • 1
    You should not access private attributes through __dict__. Matplotlib has public methods for getting access to all of these objects, e.g. ax.get_legend_handles_labels().
    – mwaskom
    Commented Aug 4, 2017 at 14:15
  • @ImportanceOfBeingErnest it's trivially easy to make your own two-point dataframe to test w/. look in the answer history if you want to see the one i used. (i took it out because IMO it obfuscated the answer without adding much value, but agree w/ you in general.)
    – keredson
    Commented Aug 4, 2017 at 15:32
  • 1
    Mmm yes it's a bit more complicated, the handles it returns are actually the objects in the axes not in the legend. You'll need to change those and then call legend after doing so.
    – mwaskom
    Commented Aug 4, 2017 at 15:47
  • 1
    If it is trivial to provide a minimal reproducible example, I don't see the problem of providing that dataframe. Commented Aug 4, 2017 at 17:44

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.