I've looked at other questions regarding this, but I can't seem to figure out where I am going wrong. The goal is to "Write a program to make an image of the Mandelbrot set by performing the iteration for all values of c = x + iy on an N × N grid spanning the region where −2 ≤ x ≤ 2 and −2 ≤ y ≤ 2. Make a density plot in which grid points inside the Mandelbrot set are colored black and those outside are colored white." Where being in the Mandelbrot set is considered the magnitude of z is never greater than 2 when iterated as z' = z^2 + c.

My code produces a grid that is almost entirely black with one tiny notch of white.

from pylab import imshow,show,gray
from numpy import zeros,linspace

z = 0 + 0j
n=100

M = zeros([n,n],int)
xvalues = linspace(-2,2,n)
yvalues = linspace(-2,2,n)

for x in xvalues:
    for y in yvalues:
        c = complex(x,y)
        for i in range(100):
            z = z*z + c
            if abs(z) > 2.0:
                M[y,x] = 1
                break

imshow(M,origin="lower")
gray()
show()

For any future readers, here is how my new code ended up looking:

from pylab import imshow,show,gray
from numpy import zeros,linspace

n=1000

M = zeros([n,n],int)
xvalues = linspace(-2,2,n)
yvalues = linspace(-2,2,n)

for u,x in enumerate(xvalues):
    for v,y in enumerate(yvalues):
        z = 0 + 0j
        c = complex(x,y)
        for i in range(100):
            z = z*z + c
            if abs(z) > 2.0:
                M[v,u] = 1
                break

imshow(M,origin="lower")
gray()
show()
up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are a couple of problems with your code.

Firstly, you are using xvalues and yvalues to index M, but those indices should be pixel index integers in the range 0..(n-1). Numpy will convert the floats in xvalues and yvalues to integers, but the resulting numbers will be in -2..2, so there won't be many pixels plotted, the image will be tiny, and you'll get wrapping due to the way negative indices work in Python.

A simple way to get the required pixel indices is to use the built-in Python function enumerate, but there may be a way to re-organize your code to do this with Numpy functions.

The other problem is that you need to reset z to zero for each pixel. Currently, your code reuses whatever the last z was for the previous pixel, and if that pixel was in the Mandelbrot set then z will be too big.

Here's a repaired version of your code. I don't have pylab, so I wrote a simple bitmap viewer using PIL. You can save them image to a file by calling img.save(filename) inside my show function; PIL will figure out the correct file format from the filename extension.

import numpy as np
from PIL import Image

def show(data):
    img = Image.frombytes('1', data.shape[::-1], np.packbits(data, 1))
    img.show()

n = 100
maxiter = 100

M = np.zeros([n, n], np.uint8)
xvalues = np.linspace(-2, 2, n)
yvalues = np.linspace(-2, 2, n)

for u, x in enumerate(xvalues):
    for v, y in enumerate(yvalues):
        z = 0
        c = complex(x, y)
        for i in range(maxiter):
            z = z*z + c
            if abs(z) > 2.0:
                M[v, u] = 1
                break

show(M)

Here's the output image:

B&W Mandelbrot


Of course, whenever you find yourself iterating over Numpy array indices, that's a sign that You're Doing It Wrong. The main point of using Numpy is that it can perform operations on whole arrays at once by internally iterating over them at C speed; the above code might as well be using plain Python lists instead of Numpy arrays.

Here's a version that gets Numpy to do most of the looping. It uses more RAM, but it's roughly 2.5 times faster than the previous version, and it's somewhat shorter.

This code uses several 2D arrays. c contains all the complex seed numbers, we carry out the core Mandelbrot calculation in z, which is initialsed to zeros. mask is a boolean array that controls where the Mandelbrot calculation needs to be performed. All its items are initially set to True, and on each iteration True items in mask that correspond to items in z that have escaped from the Mandelbrot set are set to False.

To test if a point has escaped we use z.real**2 + z.imag**2 > 4.0 rather than abs(z) > 2.0, this save a little bit of time because it avoids the expensive square root calculation and the abs function call.

We can use the final value of mask to plot the Mandelbrot set, but to make the points in the Mandelbrot set black we need to invert its values, which we can do with 1 - mask.

import numpy as np
from PIL import Image

def show(data):
    img = Image.frombytes('1', data.shape[::-1], np.packbits(data, 1))
    img.show()
    img.save('mset.png')

n = 100
maxiter = 100

a = np.linspace(-2, 2, n)
c = a + 1.j * a[:, None]
z = np.zeros((n, n), np.complex128)
mask = np.ones((n, n), np.bool)

for i in range(maxiter):
    mask[mask] = z[mask].real**2 + z[mask].imag**2 < 4.0
    z[mask] = z[mask]**2 + c[mask]

show(1 - mask)
  • Thanks! I was able to get it to work. I haven't learned the enumerate function yet so that is really useful!! – Nora Bailey Jul 28 '17 at 20:31
  • @NoraBailey I'm glad you like it. enumerate is a very handy function when working with plain Python, but it's rare that it's useful with Numpy, because normally you let Numpy look after the looping for you, as I mention in the new info I've added to my answer. – PM 2Ring Jul 28 '17 at 22:07
  • @NoraBailey you might like this linuxtopia.org/online_books/programming_books/… It covers the other list processing utilities in python :) – gokul_uf Jul 28 '17 at 22:15
from pylab import imshow,show,gray
from numpy import zeros,linspace
N=1000
A=zeros([N+1,N+1],float)
def mandler(x,y):
    c=complex(x,y)
    z=c
    n=0
    while n<N:
        z=z*z+c
        if abs(z)>2:
            return 0
        n+=1
    else:
        return 1
for x in linspace(-2,2,N):
    for y in linspace(2,-2,N):
        a=mandler(x,y)
        s=int(((x+2)*N)/4)
        t=int(((y+2)*N)/4)
        A[s,t]=a
imshow(A)
gray()
show()

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