-1
#include <conio.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <graphics.h>
#include <dos.h>


int main() {

    int gd = DETECT, gm;

    int angle = 0;

    double x, y;

    initgraph(&gd, &gm, "C:\\TC\\BGI");


    line(0, getmaxy() / 2, getmaxx(), getmaxy() / 2);

    /* generate a sine wave */

    for(x = 0; x < getmaxx(); x+=3) {

        /* calculate y value given x */

        y = 50*sin(angle*3.141/180);

        y = getmaxy()/2 - y;

        /* color a pixel at the given position */

        putpixel(x, y, 15);

        delay(100);

        /* increment angle */

        angle+=5;

    }

    getch();

    /* deallocate memory allocated for graphics screen */

    closegraph();

    return 0;

}

This is the program. Why are we incrementing the angle and how this angle is relevant to graph? I changed the value of angle to 0 and the wave became a straight line. I want to know what is happening with this increment.

  • 1
    What are your thoughts about possible answers to your questions or solutions to your problems? – nbro Jul 30 '17 at 16:47
  • the curves are generated if the angle is incremented else not – Sudhir Sharma Jul 30 '17 at 16:53
2

Why are we incrementing the angle and how this angle is relevant to graph

The sine function takes an angle as argument, typically in radiant. The program implements the angle in degrees, so it's getting scaled to radiant the moment is gets passed to sin().

The sine function is periodical to (repeats itself after) 2*pi or 360 degrees:

+---------+---------+------------+
|       angle       | sin(angle) |
+---------+---------+            |
| Radiant | Degrees |            |
+---------+---------+------------+
|       0 |       0 |          0 |
+---------+---------+------------+
|  1/2*pi |      90 |          1 |
+---------+---------+------------+
|      pi |     180 |          0 |
+---------+---------+------------+
|  3/2*pi |     270 |         -1 | 
+---------+---------+------------+
|    2*pi |     360 |          0 |
+---------+---------+------------+
|  5/2*pi |     450 |          1 |
+---------+---------+------------+
|    3*pi |     540 |          0 |
+---------+---------+------------+
|  7/2*pi |     630 |         -1 | 
+---------+---------+------------+
|    4*pi |     720 |          0 |
+---------+---------+------------+
|     ... |     ... |        ... |

and so on ...

changed the value of angle to 0 and the wave became a straight line

The result of sin(0) is 0.

For the mathematical derivation you might like to have a look here.

  • why we need to increment the angle every time? – Sudhir Sharma Jul 30 '17 at 16:59
  • @SudhirSharma if you look at this graph of a sine wave, you will see the x-axis is marked in degrees. In your program every 3 pixels on the screen (the step in x) corresponds to 5 degrees (the step in angle). – Weather Vane Jul 30 '17 at 17:28
  • 1
    @WeatherVane so this means every pixel on the screen is generated at a angle difference of 5 degrees. – Sudhir Sharma Jul 30 '17 at 17:31
-1

The sine function is y = sin(x), where x is your angle. If you don't change the angle, the value of y remains constant and you get a straight line. And in the code you gave, variable x is useless. Your variable angle does the staff. Besides, I am pretty sure you don't need to convert your angle to radiants, because sin(x) will give you a real number between -1 and 1. So you could just write

double y,x = 0; ... y = sin(x); x+= 0.1;

  • 1
    Variable x controls the screen position along the x-axis, while angle increments by 5 degrees per 3 pixels x-wise. The sin function takes an argument in radians. So you do not really answer the question, indeed is misleading. OP's program works - says so - but wants to know why it worked. – Weather Vane Jul 30 '17 at 17:11

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