103

I am using the VS Code prettier plugin to format my code, how can I add a setting to not add or remove semicolons when I format my code? I know that this feature was added in January but I found no mention in the PR or issue of how to add it to settings.

5 Answers 5

148

From the README:

prettier.semi (default: true)

Whether to add a semicolon at the end of every line (semi: true), or only at the beginning of lines that may introduce ASI failures (semi: false)

You have to set prettier.semi to false.

To change Prettier's settings in VS Code, search for >open settings:

a screenshot showing a search for "open settings"

You can also add the following to your .prettierrc file:

{
  ...
  "semi": false
}
4
  • 51
    { "semi": false} in the .prettierrc file
    – Aindriú
    Jul 28, 2020 at 13:11
  • 1
    Why can I not find the prettier settings anywhere?
    – Junglemath
    Apr 5, 2021 at 20:28
  • Can I setting semi: false for all module except of class in type script ?
    – soroush
    Feb 18, 2022 at 11:38
  • this did not work in my case. Always added the semicolons back although i did exactly whats in the post.
    – Felkru
    Jul 4, 2023 at 16:59
19

Open settings.json file*.

Add this lines to format your code on save and to remove semicolons on save:

    "editor.formatOnSave": true,

    "prettier.semi": false,




Use Ctrl+P to search for file in Vs Code.*

1
  • 1
    Doesn't work, but the built-in formatter works with "javascript.format.semicolons": "remove" Aug 16, 2022 at 10:56
13

In your Prettier settings. Add the following

semi: false
  • If you want to format your file using CLI, then
prettier --write --no-semi your_file 
1

There are a bunch of conflicting assertions in this thread, so let me take a stab at pointing out the conflicts, and how I think they can be solved:

In 2023, there are dozens of VSCode extensions one could get away with calling "the VS Code prettier plugin" (per o.p.). Let's focus on the top three most popular/common configurations:

  1. There's the official one from the Prettier team (most popular): it can actively reformat your code on save, and is the one you need to enable and/or configure in the VS Code settings.
  2. There's the one called "Prettier ESLint" (second most popular): it will actively reformat your code on save, using not only Prettier rules but allegedly also ESLint rules. But this one is configured AFAIK, using only the standard .prettierrc and .eslintrc files.
  3. Then, there's the implicit one folks may not realize they have: if you have eslint and prettier installed in your project, and then install the official "ESLint" extension for VSCode, along with the eslint-plugin-prettier and/or? eslint-config-prettier packages, then VSCode will use the ESLint plugin to automatically highlight violations of the prettier rules, as defined in your .prettierrc.

So there are at least three primary ways of getting Prettier 'active' in VSCode, depending on whether you:

  • want Prettier to actively reformat the code for you inside VSCode, rather than just flagging/warning the rule violations there
  • want to add active reformatting according to ESLint rules as well
  • prefer to configure Prettier rules using .prettierrc or the VSCode settings.json. (Myself, I'd prefer that all my rules are in the codebase and fully shareable with teammates, and that I don't force them to all use my preferred IDE.)
  • also want/need to execute Prettier in CI/CD, from the CLI, and maybe also with githooks (all good ideas, which would mean you need to have your rules (also) in .prettierrc)
  • want slightly different rules in VSCode than in other environments

Depending on your answers to those four questions, which VSCode extensions you actually have, and which JS packages you've installed, you may need to configure the prettier rules in .prettierrc, in settings.json, or in both places.

I believe the intended/ideal default behavior is that the official Prettier extension will actually defer to the .prettierrc, and that specific rules you configure in VSCode are just local overrides. But, in my own experience, I couldn't get that to work. Prettier extension kept trying to add semicolons, even though .prettierrc clearly said not to. As soon as I disabled that extension, and just let ESLint extension take over, it was fine. YMMV on that (and share your learnings in comments). Just be aware of the multiple possibilities.

0

if you using .prettierrc.js:

'use strict'

module.exports = {
  overrides: [
    {
      files: '*.{js,ts}',
      options: {
        semi: false,
      }
    }
  ]
}

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