1

Just have a question for writing SQL.
In ORACLE DB, I have rows of different apples in one "APPLE" TABLE, where the "TAGS" holds all the features of this type of apple. For example:

NAME, TAGS 
-----------
APPLE1, FUJI BOXED MEDIUM CALIFORNIA ...  
APPLE2, ORGANIC GALA PER_POUND LARGE FLORIDA ... 
APPLE3, RED_DELICIOUS MEDIA PACKED ORGANIC ... 
APPLE4, LARGE RED_DELICIOUS Mexico .... 
APPLE5, PACKED FUJI MEXICO LARGE 

Now I want to have a SQL query to find out all rows with any given tag values, For example, "FUJI MEDIUM MEXICO ". How would this SQL be look like ?

This is related to one project I am working on. IN DB, the reason why I have one "TAG" COLUMN to keep all the features, instead of having separate columns, is because we know more and more new tag values will be introduced, so instead of adding more and more columns, we would like to keep them in one column, so that the code does not need to change every time.

Thanks,

Jack

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  • 8
    "I broke first normal form and now querying my database is really hard." No kidding? Look, many of the database design principles are pretty flexible at the end of the day. Breaking first normal form by creating multi-valued fields isn't one of them. It gets really ugly and really slow really fast. Yes, better designs like @JeffUK's mean you have to deal with writing queries that don't create duplicate rows with subqueries and such, but SQL and the database engine are both really good at that type of query! They're both really bad at breaking a field into multiple fields! – Bacon Bits Jul 30 '17 at 21:36
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    I should print that comment and stick it in the dev department where i work :) – LauDec Jul 30 '17 at 21:51
  • Please: Before you ask a question, google many concise, clear, specific versions of your question. If you ask, use one as title. Move words from your title to tags & remove them from your title if they're then redundant. This title is of no use to anyone. PS A proper design doesn't have separate tag columns, it has one tag column, and its rows say "thing NAME is tagged TAG". Read some intros to information modeling & database design. – philipxy Jul 30 '17 at 23:02
  • Further to @BaconBits point, a table of valid tags would allow you to establish referential integrity, currently you are susceptible to tyopographical errors; and people using different styles. E.g. RED_DELICIOUS vs RedDelicious, Spain vs Espana vs España etc etc.. – JeffUK Jul 31 '17 at 7:58
5

You could redesign the table so it looks like this:

name  | tag
----------
Apple1| FUJI
Apple1| BOXED
...
Apple5| PACKED
Apple5| FUJI

Then to find all items with tags fuji, medium OR mexico you could do this:

SELECT name from tags where tag in ('FUJI','MEDIUM','MEXICO')
GROUP BY name

You could find all items with tags fuji, medium AND mexico with:

SELECT name from tags where tag in ('FUJI','MEDIUM','MEXICO')
GROUP BY name
HAVING count(tag) = 3

(assuming (name,tag) is unique)

This works for any number of tags. Also makes removing tags from items much easier, and allows you to join and sort on the tags too.

4
  • But this would also return the apples where its tag value is either "FUJI", "MEDIUM" or "MEXICO", where I only need to have the ones that are combined. – user3595231 Jul 31 '17 at 0:50
  • select name from tags where tag = 'FUJI' and exists (select 1 from tags t1 where t1.name = tags.name and t1.tag = 'MEDIUM') and exists (select 1 from tags t2 where t2.name = tags.name and t2.tag = 'MEXICO') or lazily, select name from (select name, count(1) as tagcount from tags where tag in ('FUJI','MEDIUM','MEXICO') group by name) where tagcount = 3 – kfinity Jul 31 '17 at 4:32
  • You can also easily convert this table design into your original layout using LISTAGG, but it's hard to convert the other way. – kfinity Jul 31 '17 at 4:33
  • " any given tag values" implies 'OR' to me, "ALL given tag values" would imply AND.. Updated answer with both options – JeffUK Jul 31 '17 at 7:54
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I assume that by "FUJI MEDIUM MEXICO" you mean that you want to select apples that are tagged with "FUJI" and "MEDIUM" and "MEXICO", in any order. In that case, the following query would work:

Select name From apple
Where tag like '%FUJI%' 
  And tag like '%MEDIUM%' 
  And tag like '%MEXICO%';

As others have mentioned, if you want a case-insensitive search, then you would want to add appropriate Upper or Lower functions, like so:

Select name From apple
Where Upper(tag) like '%FUJI%' 
  And Upper(tag) like '%MEDIUM%' 
  And Upper(tag) like '%MEXICO%';

For the sake of efficiency, tags should be stored as completely upper case or completely lower case. This would eliminate the need to call the Upper() or Lower() function on the tag value of each row, which could save a lot of time if the data set were very large.

4
  • Thanks for the inputs, but that is not exactly what I am looking for. I am try to get all rows where the tags in the query is the subset part. Something as if: " select * from Apple where <input_tags> is a subset of the apple.tags; ". Something like this, but I don't know if it is possible in a SQL query. – user3595231 Jul 31 '17 at 0:22
  • @user3595231 That, although it really is not clear, is not how you describe what you want in you question. Please edit your question to clarify. Please don't put clarifications into comments. – philipxy Jul 31 '17 at 0:32
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    @user3595231 It seems that what you want is a simple substring match; if so, then the answer by Jacobm001 is what you really want: a substring search using LIKE. – Kirby Jul 31 '17 at 2:05
  • @Kirby it does sound that way, but I can't think of a situation where you would want to match "FUJI MEDIUM MEXICO" but NOT match "FUJI MEXICO MEDIUM" – JeffUK Jul 31 '17 at 9:31
0

Better design will be your friend here.

Three tables:

CREATE TABLE APPLE_TYPE
  (APPLE_TYPE    VARCHAR2(100));

CREATE TABLE APPLE_ATTRIBUTES
  (ATTRIBUTE_TYPE  VARCHAR2(100));

CREATE TABLE APPLES
  (APPLE_ID        NUMBER,
   APPLE_TYPE      VARCHAR2(100)
     CONSTRAINT APPLES_FK1
       REFERENCES APPLE_TYPE(APPLE_TYPE)
         ON DELETE CASCADE,
   ATTRIBUTE_TYPE  VARCHAR2(100)
     CONSTRAINT APPLES_FK2
       REFERENCES APPLE_ATTRIBUTES(ATTRIBUTE_TYPE)
         ON DELETE NO ACTION);

Best of luck.

5
  • Are you sure about this ? Seems weird that, if your apple has 20 attributes, you will have to repeat your apple_type on each row. Or maybe i missed something – LauDec Jul 30 '17 at 22:03
  • @LauDec Yes, "you will have to repeat your apple_type on each row". But that fact alone is neither good nor bad.. – philipxy Jul 30 '17 at 23:29
  • @philipxy Thanks for the link. Interesting reading. One learns a lot by looking at experimented people's solution/opinion and try to understand the differences with the solution i would have chosen. – LauDec Jul 31 '17 at 0:02
  • @LauDec Read some intros to information modeling & database design. Many academic published textbooks/presentations/courses are free online (pdf, ppt, mp4, etc). Since people have written such proper tutorial organizations of relevant notions, trying to learn only via random examples seems less effective... if not hopeless. Eg: Why say it's "wierd"? If you examine why it "seems" so based on what you know, are you really just saying that it doesn't fit patterns you have noticed among examples you have seen? But there's so much we can learn from others' investigations & generalizations. – philipxy Jul 31 '17 at 0:25
  • It's not clear how to express the other design in terms of this one or vice versa. If your point is a move from a tag list column to a tag column, introducing two tables is unnecessary. – philipxy Jul 31 '17 at 6:52
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Bad table design aside, this can be accomplished using a like evaluation.

select
   apple
   tags
from
   table
where
   lower(tags) like '%tag_here%'

I've used the lower() function here to make dealing with string casing easier. When you replace tag_here do so with all lowercase characters.


That being said, you really should improve your database design. This is very inefficient from both a storage and a performance standpoint. A better design would have two different tables. One would store the apples and a second table would store the tags with a foreign key back to the apples table.

enter image description here

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  • @philipxy: How exactly do you expect to join between the two tables if not with apple_id? – Jacobm001 Jul 31 '17 at 4:51
  • I thought you were dropping tag lists for tags. I see now I can't tell whether you're doing that. I meant that that was obscured by also adding indirection for apples. – philipxy Jul 31 '17 at 6:50
0

I would create some of these tags as columns and create a second table for the "miscellaneous" tags.

Table: Apples
Apple_ID  PK
Name
Where_Grown
Size

Table:  Apple_Tags
Tag_ID PK
Apple_ID FK 
Tag

Index:  Apple_Tags.Tag, Apple_ID

Data for Apple 1 is:
Apples Table
ID:  1
Name: Fuji
Where_Grown:  California
Size: Medium

Tags Table
Tag_ID: 1
Apple_ID: 1
Tag:  Boxed

To find tags:

select * from apples a inner join apple_tags t on a.apple_id = t.apple_id

Notice I'm not storing multiple tags in one column. That breaks the first rule of normalization that columns are atomic. I'm storing them as rows in a separate table. I'm also recognizing that apple name, size, and the place where it's grown are attributes common to all apples.

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  • The sample data contained Red Delicious apples as both Apple3 and Apple4. So I chose to use an identity which in my opinion is a better key than Apple3 and Apple4. – LAS Jul 31 '17 at 0:59
  • I didn't make my point clear in my earlier comment: The most relevant design issue to the question (of course it isn't even about design) is having a tag column instead of a tag list column, but it obscures that point to make other changes. (You are clear though about doing other things. Re that I would agree that from the given use of names & tags it looks like an appropriate design for the OP's application would contain more structure. But there's not enough in the question to know what.) – philipxy Jul 31 '17 at 5:45
  • Understood. New to stack overflow but not new to development. – LAS Jul 31 '17 at 16:00

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