62

I've been struggling a lot to properly implement Stomp (websocket) Authentication and Authorization with Spring-Security. For posterity i'll answer my own question to provide a guide.


The Problem

Spring WebSocket documentation (for Authentication) looks unclear ATM (IMHO). And i couldn't understand how to properly handle Authentication and Authorization.


What i want

  • Authenticate users with login/password.
  • Prevent anonymous users to CONNECT though WebSocket.
  • Add authorization layer (user, admin, ...).
  • Having Principal available in controllers.

What i don't want

  • Authenticate on HTTP negotiation endpoints (since most of JavaScript libraries don't sends authentication headers along with the HTTP negotiation call).
3
  • Great write-up. Is it a worse approach, to actually defer authentication even further, to the handling of the first SEND frame? as opposed to the CONNECT frame. I am not yet clear on any benefits it might yield, but is it perhaps a no-no, compared to the way you describe in the answer? Jan 25 '21 at 13:49
  • ...first SEND or SUBSCRIBE, in fact Jan 25 '21 at 13:57
  • IMHO it's better to do it on CONNECT (and STOMP to support v1.2), because it's a common entrypoint instead of SEND, SUBSCRIBE, BEGIN, or any other Frame that may be introduce in future RFC Jan 26 '21 at 12:11
103

As stated above the documentation looks unclear (IMHO), until Spring provide some clear documentation, here is a boilerplate to save you from spending two days trying to understand what the security chain is doing.

A really nice attempt was made by Rob-Leggett but, he was forking some Springs class and I don't feel comfortable doing so.

Things to know before you start:

  • Security chain and Security config for http and WebSocket are completely independent.
  • Spring AuthenticationProvider take not part at all in Websocket authentication.
  • The authentication won't happen on HTTP negotiation endpoint in our case, because none of the JavaScripts STOMP (websocket) libraries I know sends the necessary authentication headers along with the HTTP request.
  • Once set on CONNECT request, the user (simpUser) will be stored in the websocket session and no more authentication will be required on further messages.

Maven deps

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-websocket</artifactId>
</dependency>
<dependency>
    <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-messaging</artifactId>
</dependency>
<dependency>
    <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-security</artifactId>
</dependency>
<dependency>
    <groupId>org.springframework.security</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-security-messaging</artifactId>
</dependency>

WebSocket configuration

The below config register a simple message broker (a simple endpoint that we will later protect).

@Configuration
@EnableWebSocketMessageBroker
public class WebSocketConfig extends WebSocketMessageBrokerConfigurer {
    @Override
    public void configureMessageBroker(final MessageBrokerRegistry config) {
        // These are endpoints the client can subscribes to.
        config.enableSimpleBroker("/queue/topic");
        // Message received with one of those below destinationPrefixes will be automatically router to controllers @MessageMapping
        config.setApplicationDestinationPrefixes("/app");
    }

    @Override
    public void registerStompEndpoints(final StompEndpointRegistry registry) {
        // Handshake endpoint
        registry.addEndpoint("stomp"); // If you want to you can chain setAllowedOrigins("*")
    }
}

Spring security config

Since the Stomp protocol rely on a first HTTP Request, we'll need to authorize HTTP call to our stomp handshake endpoint.

@Configuration
public class WebSecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {
    @Override
    protected void configure(final HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        // This is not for websocket authorization, and this should most likely not be altered.
        http
                .httpBasic().disable()
                .sessionManagement().sessionCreationPolicy(SessionCreationPolicy.STATELESS).and()
                .authorizeRequests().antMatchers("/stomp").permitAll()
                .anyRequest().denyAll();
    }
}

Then we'll create a service responsible for authenticating users.
@Component
public class WebSocketAuthenticatorService {
    // This method MUST return a UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken instance, the spring security chain is testing it with 'instanceof' later on. So don't use a subclass of it or any other class
    public UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken getAuthenticatedOrFail(final String  username, final String password) throws AuthenticationException {
        if (username == null || username.trim().isEmpty()) {
            throw new AuthenticationCredentialsNotFoundException("Username was null or empty.");
        }
        if (password == null || password.trim().isEmpty()) {
            throw new AuthenticationCredentialsNotFoundException("Password was null or empty.");
        }
        // Add your own logic for retrieving user in fetchUserFromDb()
        if (fetchUserFromDb(username, password) == null) {
            throw new BadCredentialsException("Bad credentials for user " + username);
        }

        // null credentials, we do not pass the password along
        return new UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken(
                username,
                null,
                Collections.singleton((GrantedAuthority) () -> "USER") // MUST provide at least one role
        );
    }
}

Note that: UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken MUST have at least one GrantedAuthority, if you use another constructor, Spring will auto-set isAuthenticated = false.


Almost there, now we need to create an Interceptor that will set the `simpUser` header or throw `AuthenticationException` on CONNECT messages.
@Component
public class AuthChannelInterceptorAdapter extends ChannelInterceptor {
    private static final String USERNAME_HEADER = "login";
    private static final String PASSWORD_HEADER = "passcode";
    private final WebSocketAuthenticatorService webSocketAuthenticatorService;

    @Inject
    public AuthChannelInterceptorAdapter(final WebSocketAuthenticatorService webSocketAuthenticatorService) {
        this.webSocketAuthenticatorService = webSocketAuthenticatorService;
    }

    @Override
    public Message<?> preSend(final Message<?> message, final MessageChannel channel) throws AuthenticationException {
        final StompHeaderAccessor accessor = MessageHeaderAccessor.getAccessor(message, StompHeaderAccessor.class);

        if (StompCommand.CONNECT == accessor.getCommand()) {
            final String username = accessor.getFirstNativeHeader(USERNAME_HEADER);
            final String password = accessor.getFirstNativeHeader(PASSWORD_HEADER);

            final UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken user = webSocketAuthenticatorService.getAuthenticatedOrFail(username, password);

            accessor.setUser(user);
        }
        return message;
    }
}

Note that: preSend() MUST return a UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken, another element in the spring security chain test this. Note that: If your UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken was built without passing GrantedAuthority, the authentication will fail, because the constructor without granted authorities auto set authenticated = false THIS IS AN IMPORTANT DETAIL which is not documented in spring-security.


Finally create two more class to handle respectively Authorization and Authentication.
@Configuration
@Order(Ordered.HIGHEST_PRECEDENCE + 99)
public class WebSocketAuthenticationSecurityConfig extends  WebSocketMessageBrokerConfigurer {
    @Inject
    private AuthChannelInterceptorAdapter authChannelInterceptorAdapter;
    
    @Override
    public void registerStompEndpoints(final StompEndpointRegistry registry) {
        // Endpoints are already registered on WebSocketConfig, no need to add more.
    }

    @Override
    public void configureClientInboundChannel(final ChannelRegistration registration) {
        registration.setInterceptors(authChannelInterceptorAdapter);
    }

}

Note that: The @Order is CRUCIAL don't forget it, it allows our interceptor to be registered first in the security chain.

@Configuration
public class WebSocketAuthorizationSecurityConfig extends AbstractSecurityWebSocketMessageBrokerConfigurer {
    @Override
    protected void configureInbound(final MessageSecurityMetadataSourceRegistry messages) {
        // You can customize your authorization mapping here.
        messages.anyMessage().authenticated();
    }

    // TODO: For test purpose (and simplicity) i disabled CSRF, but you should re-enable this and provide a CRSF endpoint.
    @Override
    protected boolean sameOriginDisabled() {
        return true;
    }
}
28
  • 1
    Quoting from the Spring Security guide "More concretely, to ensure a user has authenticated to your WebSocket application, all that is necessary is to ensure that you setup Spring Security to authenticate your HTTP based web application." So, the point is, that you authenticate access to the http endpoint using standard Spring Security methods, then you verify CSRF on CONNECT and use role based security on configured STOMP destinations. I am still unsure of the use case for the above. Aug 1 '17 at 6:43
  • 3
    The fact is that none of the javascrip STOMP libraries are passing authentication headers along with the HTTP handshake call. And Spring has chosen to allow users to authenticate only though HTTP. But we cant blame them for that, the WebSocket RFC is unclear and very permissive on this subject: This protocol doesn't prescribe any particular way that servers can authenticate clients during the WebSocket handshake. Aug 1 '17 at 10:01
  • 4
    Spring described method state that : You should provide sufficient information (login password or whatever) while accessing the HTTP necotiation endpoint (handshake endpoint) to allow Spring to authenticate you through the Spring-Security chain. But none of the javaScript STOMP libraries do send these information along with the HTTP negiciation call. These headers are sent with CONNECT message in nativeHeaders: { login: xxxx, passcode: xxxx}. Therefore if no informations are sent on HTTP call, you can't authenticate at this point. Aug 1 '17 at 11:49
  • 4
    Yep WebSockets reuse the same authentication information that is found in the HTTP request when the WebSocket connection was made. That is true, Websockets (so do stomp) rely on a first HTTP negotiation call, and spring expects that the authentication will take place here. But there is not a single stomp JS libs that forwards the credentials during this negotiation call. because of that you need to authenticate after the negotioation. And thus use the websocket to authenticate. That's why i sais that the two chains are decoupled. Aug 16 '19 at 12:33
  • 3
    Still to this day, your post is the ONLY thing that works. Spring boot documentation is still lacking clear instructions. Thanks a lot Sep 6 '21 at 16:38
4

for java client side use this tested example:

StompHeaders connectHeaders = new StompHeaders();
connectHeaders.add("login", "test1");
connectHeaders.add("passcode", "test");
stompClient.connect(WS_HOST_PORT, new WebSocketHttpHeaders(), connectHeaders, new MySessionHandler());
1
  • This will work with stomp.js too. But these are STOMP headers (on the CONNECT frame). The original issue is that stomp.js won't set HTTP websocket-handshake headers that'd be used by Spring Security to automatically authenticate. Jan 25 '21 at 13:46
0

Going with spring authentication is a pain. You can do it in a simple way. Create a web Filter and read the Authorization token by yourself, then perform the authentication.

@Component
public class CustomAuthenticationFilter implements Filter {
    @Override
    public void doFilter(ServletRequest servletRequest, ServletResponse servletResponse, FilterChain filterChain)
            throws IOException, ServletException {
        if (servletRequest instanceof HttpServletRequest) {
            HttpServletRequest request = (HttpServletRequest) servletRequest;
            String authorization = request.getHeader("Authorization");
            if (/*Your condition here*/) {
                // logged
                filterChain.doFilter(servletRequest, servletResponse);
            } else {
                HttpServletResponse response = (HttpServletResponse) servletResponse;
                response.setStatus(HttpStatus.UNAUTHORIZED.value());
                response.setContentType(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON_UTF8_VALUE);
                response.getWriter().write("{\"message\": "\Bad login\"}");
            }
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void init(FilterConfig filterConfig) throws ServletException {
    }

    @Override
    public void destroy() {
    }
}

Then in your configuration define the filter using the spring mechanism:

@Configuration
public class SomeConfig {
    @Bean
    public FilterRegistrationBean<CustomAuthenticationFilter> securityFilter(
            CustomAuthenticationFilter customAuthenticationFilter){
        FilterRegistrationBean<CustomAuthenticationFilter> registrationBean
                = new FilterRegistrationBean<>();

        registrationBean.setFilter(customAuthenticationFilter);
        registrationBean.addUrlPatterns("/*");
        return registrationBean;
    }
}
2
  • I agree that spring security is a long way, but doing so you loose all the convenience brought by spring-security (being able to get the User from anywhere in the request context, test mocking, ...) May 21 '21 at 15:19
  • There is no convenience in complexity. In my approach you still can inject your service and check username and password. For example you can inject WebSocketAuthenticatorService and do the check by splitting Authorization and get the username pass if this is Basic AUTH. There is no right or wrong solution here as long as it works, I prefer this as it is more elegant for me. Others might prefer other. May 22 '21 at 7:04

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