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This question already has an answer here:

Intellij is automatically adding a descriptive "word" before an argument being passed to a method. For example

Thread.sleep(1000);

automatically becomes

Thread.sleep(millis: 1000);

Interestingly enough when copying and pasting to here the "millis" is left out. What is the name of this feature and how do I disable it so the IDE doesn't automatically add it? Is this valid Java code with the "millis" in it, or will it break if I try to use a different IDE/compiler?

marked as duplicate by CrazyCoder intellij-idea Jul 31 '17 at 10:29

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You can enable/disable and configure this feature under Settings > Editor > General > Appearance: "Show parameter name hints".

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It's a new feature of Intellij (very first one).

If you look at the source of the method you are calling, that is the argument name used there. So you are passing 1000 as the arguments millis.

This is the source of the method you are using

public static native void sleep(long millis) throws InterruptedException;

That is the reason you seeing millis while using it.

It is a way to show you which param you are passing if there are many.

I suggest you to keep it as it is a good feature but if you want to disable it, go to Settings > Editor > General > Appearance and uncheck show parameter name hints

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It's not valid Java code literally as Java doesn't have named variables. However it's simply a feature of the IDE to display the parameter name. It's not stored in the source so it can't break things. You can probably disable it through settings, but isn't that helpful?

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It's of course no valid java code but just a way to show the developer what kind of data this method handles. It becomes obvious through not copy-pasting the hint, but just the value you entered there. Think of it as a kind of mini javadoc showing you the name of the parameter as it is used in the implementation.
Possibly, you can switch that off but you may find that helpful after getting used to it.

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