52

PHP supports the spread syntax for variadic functions.

In JavaScript, you can use the spread syntax to do this:

var a = [1, 2];
var b = [...a, 3, 4];
console.log(b); // [1, 2, 3, 4]

However, trying to do this in PHP:

$a = [1, 2];
$b = [...$a, 3, 4];
var_dump($b);die;

Results in this error:

Parse error: syntax error, unexpected '...' (T_ELLIPSIS), expecting ']'

Is using the spread syntax this way not allowed in PHP? If so, is there an equally-as-elegant way to achieve the same effect?

4
  • 10
    No, PHP doesn't have a magic shortcut syntax: just the basic $b = array_merge($a, [3, 4]);
    – Mark Baker
    Commented Jul 31, 2017 at 15:00
  • 4
    It's part of PHP since December 2019 wiki.php.net/rfc/spread_operator_for_array Commented May 11, 2019 at 16:06
  • 1
    It's part of PHP since December 2019 or 2018? Current date of the my comment is, 13/05/2019
    – chalo
    Commented May 13, 2019 at 18:53
  • 3
    It will be available in PHP 7.4.
    – CedX
    Commented Sep 23, 2019 at 21:04

4 Answers 4

69

The spread operator in the arrays RFC has been implemented in PHP 7.4:

$ary = [3, 4, 5];
return [1, 2, ...$ary]; // same as [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

Caveat: The unpacked array/Traversable can only have integer keys. For string keys array_merge() is still required.

2
18

Update: Spread Operator in Array Expression

Source: https://wiki.php.net/rfc/spread_operator_for_array

Version: 0.2
Date: 2018-10-13
Author: CHU Zhaowei, [email protected]
Status: Implemented (in PHP 7.4)

An array pair prefixed by will be expanded in places during array definition. Only arrays and objects who implement Traversable can be expanded.

For example:

$parts = ['apple', 'pear'];
$fruits = ['banana', 'orange', ...$parts, 'watermelon'];
// ['banana', 'orange', 'apple', 'pear', 'watermelon'];

It's possible to do the expansion multiple times, and unlike argument unpacking, … can be used anywhere. It's possible to add normal elements before or after the spread operator.

Spread operator works for both array syntax(array()) and short syntax([]).

It's also possible to unpack array returned by a function immediately.

$arr1 = [1, 2, 3];
$arr2 = [...$arr1]; //[1, 2, 3]
$arr3 = [0, ...$arr1]; //[0, 1, 2, 3]
$arr4 = array(...$arr1, ...$arr2, 111); //[1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 111]
$arr5 = [...$arr1, ...$arr1]; //[1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3]

function getArr() {
  return ['a', 'b'];
}
$arr6 = [...getArr(), 'c']; //['a', 'b', 'c']

$arr7 = [...new ArrayIterator(['a', 'b', 'c'])]; //['a', 'b', 'c']

function arrGen() {
    for($i = 11; $i < 15; $i++) {
        yield $i;
    }
}
$arr8 = [...arrGen()]; //[11, 12, 13, 14]

<---------------End of Update-------------------->

First of all you are referencing the Variadic function with arrays in wrong sense.

You can create your own method for doing this, or you can better use array_merge as suggested by @Mark Baker in comment under your question.

If you still want to use spread operator / ..., you can implement something like this yourself.

<?php
function merge($a, ...$b) {
    return array_merge($a,$b);
}

$a = [1, 2];
$b = [3,4];
print_r( merge($a, ...$b));
?>

But to me, doing it like this is stupidity. Because you still have to use something like array_merge. Even if a language implements this, behind the scene the language is using merge function which contains code for copying all the elements of two arrays into a single array. I wrote this answer just because you asked way of doing this, and elegancy was your demand.

More reasonable example:

<?php
$a = [1,2,3,56,564];
$result = merge($a, 332, 232, 5434, 65);
var_dump($result);
?>
4
  • What about if I want to preserve keys? array_merge is not sufficient in this case.
    – Facedown
    Commented Apr 24, 2018 at 16:08
  • @Facedownn did you try the code? array_merge preserves the keys. Or you meant something else? Commented Apr 25, 2018 at 1:30
  • Following example will not preserve keys causing 4 items on output, but I want only 2. array_merge(...[[2 => 'foo', 3 => 'bar'], [2 => 'foo', 3 => 'baz']]) I was looking for something like + (plus) operator for such case.
    – Facedown
    Commented Apr 26, 2018 at 10:57
  • @Facedown please ask another question, this is not related to what you are asking. Commented Apr 26, 2018 at 13:56
7

Below PHP 7.4

$mainArray = ['element1', 'element2'];
$finalArray = array_merge($mainArray, ['element3']);
print_r($finalArray);
// Final array would be ['element1', 'element2', 'element3'];

In or Above PHP 7.4

$mainArray = ['element1', 'element2'];
$finalArray = [...$mainArray, 'element3'];
print_r($finalArray);
// Final array would be ['element1', 'element2', 'element3'];
6

In PHP 7.4 you can now use Spread Operators in array expressions.

$parts = ['apple', 'pear'];
$fruits = ['banana', 'orange', ...$parts, 'watermelon'];
// ['banana', 'orange', 'apple', 'pear', 'watermelon'];
2

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