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I want to be able to do something like the following:

var book = new Book();
book.LoadByPrimaryKey(id); //returns bool

The issue I am coming across is I can't figure out if there is a simple way to load data into an object generated using Entity Framework. I understand how to grab the information needed to fill the object, but is there a simple way to fill out all the properties of an object without explicitly going through each property and setting it to the desired value? In C# I cannot simply type:

this = db.Books.Single(d => d.BookId == id);

I instead have to explicitly set each property:

var book = db.Books.Single(d => d.BookId == id);
this.Title = book.Title;
this.PageCount = book.PageCount;
...

Is there a way around doing this when wanting to load up an object? Maybe something with a DbDataReader? I have used the data reader to load DataTables, but can't figure out how to use them to populate an object. Maybe I'm over thinking it.

  • 1
    What's the use case, i.e. why do you need that? db.Books.Single(d => d.BookId == id) already returns a (new) loaded object. – Ivan Stoev Jul 31 '17 at 15:50
  • This is not what EF is for. EF is a strict ORM with a little more convenience functionality. – DevilSuichiro Jul 31 '17 at 16:06
  • Other ORMs do this as part of their package. We currently use EntitySpaces and are upgrading it to Entity Framework because ES is no longer supported. – Casey Corder Jul 31 '17 at 16:19
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When you need to copy all of the properties from one object to another you can

  1. Just write the code (typing practice)
  2. Generate the code using a T4 Template
  3. Use Reflection
  4. Use Automapper
  • Yeah, we will probably have to end up doing one or more of those things. We are changing a piece of legacy software using EntitySpaces (has built-in loading methods) to use EF6. – Casey Corder Jul 31 '17 at 16:27
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As David Browne previously answered:

  1. Just write the code (typing practice)
  2. Generate the code using a T4 Template
  3. Use Reflection
  4. Use Automapper

The answer he gave you is correct. But I'm want to extend it and explain why.

First, let put some concept here. When we go further in programming techniques, sometimes, the working answer, it not enough. Although what you trying to do is a valid solution for the problem, there is some issue with it.

The is a concept that is called S.O.L.I.D. The first letter (S) stands for Single Responsibility Principle. This means that one object should have only one responsibility.

The problem in your approach is you are putting multiple responsibilities in a single object:

  1. Hold/Transport information about a book.
  2. Load from a remote server (in this case a DataBase) information about a book.

You probably googled this issue before post here, and I suspect you found nothing useful. Now the reason you found nothing is because this is a bad approach, it goes against the SOLID concepts, and it breaks several interation with possible Design Patterns. So this is why you probably found nothing, there is no previous conceived tool of workaround to this problem, because this is a discouraged approach, so no one, with a little understand of program techniques, will help you.

Therefore, we go back to the answer that David Browne gave you. To use Automapper (the simplest of the suggestions). You need to change your approach. Consider to separate each responsibility in a different class:

class BookDA // DAO = data access
{
    private MyDbConnection db;

    public BookTO Get()
    {
        var book = db.Books.Single(d => d.BookId == id);

        return book;
    }
}

class BookTO // TO = transport object
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

In the code above each responsibility is associated with a different class. This answer became too long but I hope it helps.

  • So I assume classes generated by Entity Framework are transport objects? And I will need to make a new, different class to put all my methods to run queries and stored procedures in? – Casey Corder Jul 31 '17 at 17:52
  • Yes, this is the idea. – Jonny Piazzi Aug 1 '17 at 1:20

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