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Possible Duplicates:
Constructors and Inheritance
Why are constructors not inherited?

When define class inherited from base class, I have to redefine all its constructors. I am wondering why C# does not support inherit from base class's constructors?

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  • don't think it is done in any other language (like Java). Only default ctor (if any) is called from child class. – TheVillageIdiot Dec 28 '10 at 7:34
  • Well because it is a different object. (functions are the same) – RvdK Dec 28 '10 at 7:36
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    @KarlKnechtel Because it makes sense to, if there are no constructors explicitly defined in a child class, allow the constructors from the base class to be copied over. The base class may have variables that you can set with the constructor such as (X, Y, Color) that wouldn't change in the derived class, i.e. the constructor would still be valid. – user1881400 Jan 3 '15 at 2:29
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    @KarlKnechtel for the same reason all other public methods are inherited? – Tom Dalton Jun 15 '17 at 14:00
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Constructors are not inherited because we wouldn't be able to properly determine how our derived class objects were instantiated. When all derived classes would use parent's constructors implicitly, in my oppinion it would be a problem because if we forgot to redefine constructor, the object might have been initialized incorrectly. If you would like the derived class constructor to do the same as parent class constructor, call it using base.

Also be aware of the fact that the base class constructor (parameterless) is automatically run if you don't call any other base class constructor taking arguments explicitly. So calling base() is redundant.

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6

The constructor of the derived class implicitly calls the constructor for the base class, or the superclass in Java terminology. In inheritance, all base class constructors are called before the derived class's constructors in the order that the classes appear in the class hierarchy.

Now, if the base class has more than one constructor, then the derived class has to define which one should be called. For example:

public class CoOrds
{
    private int x, y;

    public CoOrds()
    {
        x = 0;
        y = 0;
    }

    public CoOrds(int x, int y)
    {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
    }
}

//inherits CoOrds:
public class ColorCoOrds : CoOrds
{
    public System.Drawing.Color color;

    public ColorCoOrds() : base ()
    {
        color = System.Drawing.Color.Red;
    }

    public ColorCoOrds(int x, int y) : base (x, y)
    {
        color = System.Drawing.Color.Red;
    }
}

For more information please visit: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms228387(v=vs.80).aspx

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  • This is the real winner answer to the original question. Despite being an old post I have no doubt in upvoting your answer. You are the only one who got it right. That's exactly what I was looking for and it works as you described. Thanks. – OrizG Nov 28 '17 at 3:26
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Only member variables and member methods can be inherited from one class to derived.

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