1

I'm refreshing my knowledge of C by doing some random exercises. The following is an excerpt from my solution to counting how many vowels in a string. It works but there has to be a more concise way to write this if statement. Any ideas?

for(int i = 0; i < length; i++) {
    if(input[i] == 'a' || input[i] == 'e' || input[i] == 'i' || input[i] == 'o' || input[i] == 'u') {
        total++;
    }
}
  • 1
    If you are only inerested in ASCII encoding, directly indexing a 128-byte lookup table with the char value would be reasonably quick, and really flexible, with lower/upper case handled easily. With a bit(!) of shifting etc. a 128-bit table could do the same job and would fit into a cache line. – Martin James Aug 2 '17 at 0:42
  • @MartinJames Each byte can hold the value (0/1) for 8 characters. 128 / 8 = 16 bytes. Would easily fit in most cache lines. Nice solution! Even with two values in each byte, the table would fit in a 64 byte cache line. – Ajay Brahmakshatriya Aug 2 '17 at 4:36
  • @Carcigenicate That is the problem. C does not have builtin sets. You might simulate with large bitfields. – Gerhardh Aug 2 '17 at 6:14
6

You can do this with a switch with fallthrough cases:

for(int i = 0; i < length; i++) {
    switch (input[i]) {
    case 'a':
    case 'e':
    case 'i':
    case 'o':
    case 'u':
        total++;
        break;
    }
}
  • Good point. I feel mine is more readable but maybe that's because I don't really like using switch statements :P – shmink Aug 2 '17 at 0:50
  • @Shmink use switch wherever you can. The compiler decides what is the most efficient lowering for it. – Ajay Brahmakshatriya Aug 2 '17 at 4:24
2

You could use the library function strtok to tokenize the input string, like this:

pch = strtok (input,"aeiou");
while (pch != NULL)
{
    total++;
    pch = strtok (NULL, "aeiou");
}

Note that strtok is destructive to the input string.

1

strchr lets you search a character string for a specific character. It looks like a reasonable way to solve your problem.

Untested code:

char findMe = 'e';
char *vowels="aeiou";
if (strchr(vowels, findMe) != NULL)
{
   print("found\n");
}
else
{
   print("not found");
}
  • How is this remotely related to what OP is asking? He needs the count of all the vowels in the input string. Boolean on whether a vowel exists doesn't help in anyway. Moreover he is trying to make his condition more succinct. Adding more conditions in your code to search for all the vowels in just going to make the condition even larger. – Ajay Brahmakshatriya Aug 2 '17 at 4:31
0

you can make it this way better and faster make array of the variables you want to check Ex char *array = ['i','o','a','e']; then

for(int i = 0; i < length; i++) {
   for(int i2 = 0; i2 < length; i2++){
      if(input[i] == array[i2]){
         total++;
      }
  }
}

this way you can add as much as char you want to compare and less || statements and faster .

  • 1
    True, I was considering this approach. Out of curiosity, not that it matters at these small scales but what's better for performance between a bigger if statement or a nested if statement? – shmink Aug 2 '17 at 0:49
  • 2
    I agree. The OP code will overcome this solution as the string grows. Not only does the OP's example run in linear time, but the OR statements will short-circuit avoiding unnecessary checks compared to this O(n^2) approach. – Miket25 Aug 2 '17 at 0:55
  • @Shmink I think the nesting loop will make it more obscure. – haolee Aug 2 '17 at 0:55
  • in my opinion : nested is better for reading , since it all depends on your starting condition for example I want to check if this char equal to( i )and (i) condition I put it in the last if condition block or in the last line among the conditions that way will take approximate the same time – Amr H Aug 2 '17 at 1:00
  • Readability really falls under opinion. As for your comment on the "same time," I'm not sure if I understand what you mean? In the worst case, the vowel array will have to be iterated for each character of the string, and even when a character is matched, it will still have to keep searching the vowel array causing unnecessary checks. – Miket25 Aug 2 '17 at 1:09

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