72

I have a list of items

  • John ID
  • Matt ID
  • John ID
  • Scott ID
  • Matt ID
  • John ID
  • Lucas ID

I want to shove them back into a list like so which also means I want to sort by the highest number of duplicates.

  • John ID 3
  • Matt ID 2
  • Scott ID 1
  • Lucas ID 1

Let me know how I can do this with LINQ and C#.

Thanks All

EDIT 2 Showing Code:

    List<game> inventory = new List<game>();
    drinkingforDataContext db = new drinkingforDataContext();
    foreach (string item in tbTitle.Text.Split(' '))
    {

        List<game> getItems = (from dfg in db.drinkingfor_Games
                               where dfg.game_Name.Contains(tbTitle.Text)
                               select new game
                               {
                                   gameName = dfg.game_Name,
                                   gameID = Boomers.Utilities.Guids.Encoder.EncodeURLs(dfg.uid)
                               }).ToList<game>();

        for (int i = 0; i < getItems.Count(); i++)
        {
            inventory.Add(getItems[i]);
        }
    }

    var items = (from xx in inventory
                 group xx by xx into g
                 let count = g.Count()
                 orderby count descending
                 select new
                    {
                        Count = count,
                        gameName = g.Key.gameName,
                        gameID = g.Key.gameID
                    });

    lvRelatedGames.DataSource = items;
    lvRelatedGames.DataBind();

This query displays these results:

  • 1 hello world times
  • 1 hello world times
  • 1 Hello World.
  • 1 hello world times
  • 1 hello world times
  • 1 hello world times
  • 1 Hello World.
  • 1 hello world times

It gives me the count and name, but it doesn't give me the ID of the game....

It should display:

  • 6 hello world times 234234
  • 2 Hello World. 23432432
  • given your results it is obvious that program treats all of your items as distinct - as I said, you need to implement custom comparer, otherwise it is not possible to select distinct values – aku Jan 18 '09 at 4:42
98

You can use "group by" + "orderby". See LINQ 101 for details

var list = new List<string> {"a", "b", "a", "c", "a", "b"};
var q = from x in list
        group x by x into g
        let count = g.Count()
        orderby count descending
        select new {Value = g.Key, Count = count};
foreach (var x in q)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Value: " + x.Value + " Count: " + x.Count);
}

In response to this post (now deleted):

If you have a list of some custom objects then you need to use custom comparer or group by specific property.

Also query can't display result. Show us complete code to get a better help.

Based on your latest update:

You have this line of code:

group xx by xx into g

Since xx is a custom object system doesn't know how to compare one item against another. As I already wrote, you need to guide compiler and provide some property that will be used in objects comparison or provide custom comparer. Here is an example:

Note that I use Foo.Name as a key - i.e. objects will be grouped based on value of Name property.

There is one catch - you treat 2 objects to be duplicate based on their names, but what about Id ? In my example I just take Id of the first object in a group. If your objects have different Ids it can be a problem.

//Using extension methods
var q = list.GroupBy(x => x.Name)
            .Select(x => new {Count = x.Count(), 
                              Name = x.Key, 
                              ID = x.First().ID})
            .OrderByDescending(x => x.Count);

//Using LINQ
var q = from x in list
        group x by x.Name into g
        let count = g.Count()
        orderby count descending
        select new {Name = g.Key, Count = count, ID = g.First().ID};

foreach (var x in q)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Count: " + x.Count + " Name: " + x.Name + " ID: " + x.ID);
}
  • just displaying the results to a custom repeater.... – SpoiledTechie.com Jan 18 '09 at 4:38
  • Scott, just show your code – aku Jan 18 '09 at 4:39
  • Done, You can now get a glimpse of what im looking at. – SpoiledTechie.com Jan 18 '09 at 4:45
  • select new {Name = g.Key, Count = count, ID = g.First().ID}; This was the line that made it work. Thanks Aku. Its the .First.ID part that made it work. Ur Brilliant... – SpoiledTechie.com Jan 18 '09 at 5:21
  • Thanks for the x.First().ID thing – ParPar Jun 10 '15 at 9:54
45

Slightly shorter version using methods chain:

var list = new List<string> {"a", "b", "a", "c", "a", "b"};
var q = list.GroupBy(x => x)
            .Select(g => new {Value = g.Key, Count = g.Count()})
            .OrderByDescending(x=>x.Count);

foreach (var x in q)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Value: " + x.Value + " Count: " + x.Count);
}
9

You can also do Dictionary:

 var list = new List<string> { "a", "b", "a", "c", "a", "b" };
 var result = list.GroupBy(x => x)
            .ToDictionary(y=>y.Key, y=>y.Count())
            .OrderByDescending(z => z.Value);

 foreach (var x in result)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Value: " + x.Key + " Count: " + x.Value);
        }
6

The other solutions use GroupBy. GroupBy is slow (it holds all the elements in memory) so I wrote my own method CountBy:

public static Dictionary<TKey,int> CountBy<TSource,TKey>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource,TKey> keySelector)
{
    var countsByKey = new Dictionary<TKey,int>();
    foreach(var x in source)
    {
        var key = keySelector(x);
        if (!countsByKey.ContainsKey(key))
            countsByKey[key] = 0;
        countsByKey[key] += 1;
    }
    return countsByKey;
}
0

Here is the complete programme please check this

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    List<string> li = new List<string>();
    li.Add("Ram");
    li.Add("shyam");
    li.Add("Ram");
    li.Add("Kumar");
    li.Add("Kumar");

    var x = from obj in li group obj by obj into g select new { Name = g.Key, Duplicatecount = g.Count() };
    foreach(var m in x)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(m.Name + "--" + m.Duplicatecount);
    }
    Console.ReadLine();
}        

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