3

Goal is to create a 9x9 Sudoku matrix in Python.

So I got this far. But I cannot seem to get the program to get the interior contingent boxes correct.

def sudoku(size):
    import random as rn
    mydict = {}
    n = 0
    while len(mydict) < 9:
        n += 1
        x = range(1, size+1)
        testlist = rn.sample(x, len(x))

        isgood = True
        for dictid,savedlist in mydict.items():
            if isgood == False:
                break
            for v in savedlist:
                if testlist[savedlist.index(v)] == v:
                    isgood = False
                    break
        if isgood == True:
            #print 'success', testlist
            mydict[len(mydict)] = testlist
    return mydict, n

return_dict, total_tries = sudoku(9)
for n,v in return_dict.items():
    print n,v
print 'in',total_tries,'tries'
0
17

You can generate a random sudoku solution board where all numbers are filled in and then remove some of them to create the puzzle. This will ensure that the puzzle always has a solution. Making sure that it has exactly one solution is a bit more challenging (hint: you must leave at least 17 numbers for a 9x9 sudoku)

The algorithm below will generate a NxN random sudoku solution board instantly for N < 1000.

base  = 3
side  = base*base

# pattern for a baseline valid solution
def pattern(r,c): return (base*(r%base)+r//base+c)%side

# randomize rows, columns and numbers (of valid base pattern)
from random import sample
def shuffle(s): return sample(s,len(s)) 
rBase = range(base) 
rows  = [ g*base + r for g in shuffle(rBase) for r in shuffle(rBase) ] 
cols  = [ g*base + c for g in shuffle(rBase) for c in shuffle(rBase) ]
nums  = shuffle(range(1,base*base+1))

# produce board using randomized baseline pattern
board = [ [nums[pattern(r,c)] for c in cols] for r in rows ]

for line in board: print(line)

[6, 2, 5, 8, 4, 3, 7, 9, 1]
[7, 9, 1, 2, 6, 5, 4, 8, 3]
[4, 8, 3, 9, 7, 1, 6, 2, 5]
[8, 1, 4, 5, 9, 7, 2, 3, 6]
[2, 3, 6, 1, 8, 4, 9, 5, 7]
[9, 5, 7, 3, 2, 6, 8, 1, 4]
[5, 6, 9, 4, 3, 2, 1, 7, 8]
[3, 4, 2, 7, 1, 8, 5, 6, 9]
[1, 7, 8, 6, 5, 9, 3, 4, 2]

You can then remove some of the numbers from the sudoku solution to create the puzzle:

squares = side*side
empties = squares * 3//4
for p in sample(range(squares),empties):
    board[p//side][p%side] = 0

numSize = len(str(side))
for line in board: print("["+"  ".join(f"{n or '.':{numSize}}" for n in line)+"]")

[6  .  .  .  .  3  .  .  1]
[.  9  .  .  .  .  .  .  3]
[4  .  3  .  .  .  6  .  .]
[.  .  .  5  9  .  2  .  6]
[.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .]
[.  .  7  .  .  .  .  .  4]
[.  .  .  .  .  .  1  7  .]
[.  .  2  .  .  8  .  .  .]
[.  .  8  .  .  .  .  4  2]

For 4x4 up to 36x36 puzzles, you could make a nicer print of the board like this:

def expandLine(line):
    return line[0]+line[5:9].join([line[1:5]*(base-1)]*base)+line[9:13]
line0  = expandLine("╔═══╤═══╦═══╗")
line1  = expandLine("║ . │ . ║ . ║")
line2  = expandLine("╟───┼───╫───╢")
line3  = expandLine("╠═══╪═══╬═══╣")
line4  = expandLine("╚═══╧═══╩═══╝")

symbol = " 1234567890ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"
nums   = [ [""]+[symbol[n] for n in row] for row in board ]
print(line0)
for r in range(1,side+1):
    print( "".join(n+s for n,s in zip(nums[r-1],line1.split("."))) )
    print([line2,line3,line4][(r%side==0)+(r%base==0)])

╔═══╤═══╤═══╦═══╤═══╤═══╦═══╤═══╤═══╗
║ 6 │   │   ║   │   │ 3 ║   │   │ 1 ║
╟───┼───┼───╫───┼───┼───╫───┼───┼───╢
║   │ 9 │   ║   │   │   ║   │   │ 3 ║
╟───┼───┼───╫───┼───┼───╫───┼───┼───╢
║ 4 │   │ 3 ║   │   │   ║ 6 │   │   ║
╠═══╪═══╪═══╬═══╪═══╪═══╬═══╪═══╪═══╣
║   │   │   ║ 5 │ 9 │   ║ 2 │   │ 6 ║
╟───┼───┼───╫───┼───┼───╫───┼───┼───╢
║   │   │   ║   │   │   ║   │   │   ║
╟───┼───┼───╫───┼───┼───╫───┼───┼───╢
║   │   │ 7 ║   │   │   ║   │   │ 4 ║
╠═══╪═══╪═══╬═══╪═══╪═══╬═══╪═══╪═══╣
║   │   │   ║   │   │   ║ 1 │ 7 │   ║
╟───┼───┼───╫───┼───┼───╫───┼───┼───╢
║   │   │ 2 ║   │   │ 8 ║   │   │   ║
╟───┼───┼───╫───┼───┼───╫───┼───┼───╢
║   │   │ 8 ║   │   │   ║   │ 4 │ 2 ║
╚═══╧═══╧═══╩═══╧═══╧═══╩═══╧═══╧═══╝

[EDIT]

Here are some additional information on the shuffling process ...

Shuffling rows is broken down in groups of 3 rows. It is ok to swap groups as a whole but we can't swap rows across groups without breaking the integrity of the blocks. (the same reasoning applies to columns)

For example:

0 [6, 2, 5,  8, 4, 3,  7, 9, 1] \                 -|
1 [7, 9, 1,  2, 6, 5,  4, 8, 3] |  group 0 -|     -| r in shuffle(rBase) 
2 [4, 8, 3,  9, 7, 1,  6, 2, 5] /           |     -|
                                            |
3 [8, 1, 4,  5, 9, 7,  2, 3, 6] \           |     -|
4 [2, 3, 6,  1, 8, 4,  9, 5, 7] |  group 1 -| *   -| r in shuffle(rBase)
5 [9, 5, 7,  3, 2, 6,  8, 1, 4] /           |     -|
                                            |
6 [5, 6, 9,  4, 3, 2,  1, 7, 8] \           |     -|
7 [3, 4, 2,  7, 1, 8,  5, 6, 9] |  group 2 -|     -| r in shuffle(rBase)
8 [1, 7, 8,  6, 5, 9,  3, 4, 2] /                 -|

                                * for g in shuffle(rBase)

We can swap groups 0,1,2 by moving all 3 of their rows at the same time:

3 [8, 1, 4,  5, 9, 7,  2, 3, 6] \           |     -|
4 [2, 3, 6,  1, 8, 4,  9, 5, 7] |  group 1 -|     -| r in shuffle(rBase)
5 [9, 5, 7,  3, 2, 6,  8, 1, 4] /           |     -|
                                            |
6 [5, 6, 9,  4, 3, 2,  1, 7, 8] \           |     -|
7 [3, 4, 2,  7, 1, 8,  5, 6, 9] |  group 2 -| *   -| r in shuffle(rBase)
8 [1, 7, 8,  6, 5, 9,  3, 4, 2] /                 -|
                                            |
0 [6, 2, 5,  8, 4, 3,  7, 9, 1] \           |     -|
1 [7, 9, 1,  2, 6, 5,  4, 8, 3] |  group 0 -|     -| r in shuffle(rBase) 
2 [4, 8, 3,  9, 7, 1,  6, 2, 5] /           |     -|

                                * for g in shuffle(rBase)

And we can swap between the 3 rows of a group (e.g. 3,4,5) ...

0 [6, 2, 5,  8, 4, 3,  7, 9, 1] \                 -|
1 [7, 9, 1,  2, 6, 5,  4, 8, 3] |  group 0 -|     -| r in shuffle(rBase) 
2 [4, 8, 3,  9, 7, 1,  6, 2, 5] /           |     -|
                                            |
5 [9, 5, 7,  3, 2, 6,  8, 1, 4] \           |     -|
4 [2, 3, 6,  1, 8, 4,  9, 5, 7] |  group 1 -| *   -| r in shuffle(rBase)
3 [8, 1, 4,  5, 9, 7,  2, 3, 6] /           |     -|
                                            |
6 [5, 6, 9,  4, 3, 2,  1, 7, 8] \           |     -|
7 [3, 4, 2,  7, 1, 8,  5, 6, 9] |  group 2 -|     -| r in shuffle(rBase)
8 [1, 7, 8,  6, 5, 9,  3, 4, 2] /                 -|

                                * for g in shuffle(rBase)

We CANNOT swap rows across groups (e.g. 1 <--> 3):

0 [6, 2, 5,  8, 4, 3,  7, 9, 1] \                 -|
3 [8, 1, 4,  5, 9, 7,  2, 3, 6] |  group 0 -|     -| r in shuffle(rBase) 
2 [4, 8, 3,  9, 7, 1,  6, 2, 5] /           |     -|
                                            |
1 [7, 9, 1,  2, 6, 5,  4, 8, 3] \           |     -|
4 [2, 3, 6,  1, 8, 4,  9, 5, 7] |  group 1 -| *   -| r in shuffle(rBase)
5 [9, 5, 7,  3, 2, 6,  8, 1, 4] /           |     -|
                                            |
6 [5, 6, 9,  4, 3, 2,  1, 7, 8] \           |     -|
7 [3, 4, 2,  7, 1, 8,  5, 6, 9] |  group 2 -|     -| r in shuffle(rBase)
8 [1, 7, 8,  6, 5, 9,  3, 4, 2] /                 -|

                                * for g in shuffle(rBase)

See the duplicate 8 in the top left block, duplicate 7 below that, etc.

Single solution puzzle

In order to generate a sudoku puzzle with only one solution you will need a solver function that can tell you if there are more than one solution. The strategy I would suggest is to start with 75% (or more) of the numbers removed, then check that there is only one solution. If there is more than one solution, put back a number and check again. You can put back a number at a random position or select a position where the solutions differ (which will converge faster to a single solution puzzle)

First write a solver that will generate all solutions that it finds (ideally as a generator because we only need the first 2). Here's a simple one:

def shortSudokuSolve(board):
    size    = len(board)
    block   = int(size**0.5)
    board   = [n for row in board for n in row ]      
    span    = { (n,p): { (g,n)  for g in (n>0)*[p//size, size+p%size, 2*size+p%size//block+p//size//block*block] }
                for p in range(size*size) for n in range(size+1) }
    empties = [i for i,n in enumerate(board) if n==0 ]
    used    = set().union(*(span[n,p] for p,n in enumerate(board) if n))
    empty   = 0
    while empty>=0 and empty<len(empties):
        pos        = empties[empty]
        used      -= span[board[pos],pos]
        board[pos] = next((n for n in range(board[pos]+1,size+1) if not span[n,pos]&used),0)
        used      |= span[board[pos],pos]
        empty     += 1 if board[pos] else -1
        if empty == len(empties):
            solution = [board[r:r+size] for r in range(0,size*size,size)]
            yield solution
            empty -= 1

Starting with a solution variable with all numbers present and board variable containing the puzzle with 3/4 of numbers cleared, you can add numbers back to the board until there is only one way to solve it:

solution=[[9, 5, 3, 1, 6, 7, 4, 2, 8],
          [4, 2, 8, 3, 5, 9, 7, 6, 1],
          [7, 6, 1, 8, 2, 4, 9, 5, 3],
          [5, 8, 4, 9, 3, 6, 2, 1, 7],
          [6, 3, 9, 7, 1, 2, 5, 8, 4],
          [2, 1, 7, 4, 8, 5, 6, 3, 9],
          [3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 1, 8, 7, 2],
          [8, 7, 2, 5, 4, 3, 1, 9, 6],
          [1, 9, 6, 2, 7, 8, 3, 4, 5]]    
board=[ [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 8],
        [0, 2, 0, 0, 5, 0, 7, 6, 0],
        [0, 6, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 3],
        [5, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 2, 0, 7],
        [0, 3, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0],
        [2, 0, 0, 4, 0, 0, 0, 3, 0],
        [0, 0, 0, 6, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
        [8, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
        [1, 0, 0, 2, 7, 0, 0, 4, 0]]
    
import random
from itertools import islice
while True:
    solved  = [*islice(shortSudokuSolve(board),2)]
    if len(solved)==1:break
    diffPos = [(r,c) for r in range(9) for c in range(9)
               if solved[0][r][c] != solved[1][r][c] ] 
    r,c = random.choice(diffPos)
    board[r][c] = solution[r][c]

output:

╔═══╤═══╤═══╦═══╤═══╤═══╦═══╤═══╤═══╗
║   │   │   ║   │   │ 7 ║   │   │ 8 ║
╟───┼───┼───╫───┼───┼───╫───┼───┼───╢
║   │ 2 │   ║   │ 5 │   ║ 7 │ 6 │   ║
╟───┼───┼───╫───┼───┼───╫───┼───┼───╢
║   │ 6 │   ║ 8 │   │ 4 ║   │   │ 3 ║
╠═══╪═══╪═══╬═══╪═══╪═══╬═══╪═══╪═══╣
║ 5 │   │   ║   │   │   ║ 2 │   │ 7 ║
╟───┼───┼───╫───┼───┼───╫───┼───┼───╢
║   │ 3 │   ║   │ 1 │   ║   │   │   ║
╟───┼───┼───╫───┼───┼───╫───┼───┼───╢
║ 2 │   │   ║ 4 │   │   ║   │ 3 │   ║
╠═══╪═══╪═══╬═══╪═══╪═══╬═══╪═══╪═══╣
║   │ 4 │   ║ 6 │   │   ║   │   │   ║
╟───┼───┼───╫───┼───┼───╫───┼───┼───╢
║ 8 │   │   ║   │   │   ║ 1 │   │ 6 ║
╟───┼───┼───╫───┼───┼───╫───┼───┼───╢
║ 1 │   │   ║ 2 │ 7 │   ║   │ 4 │   ║
╚═══╧═══╧═══╩═══╧═══╧═══╩═══╧═══╧═══╝

Note that this will work in a reasonable time for 9x9 sudoku boards but you will need a much better/faster solver function for larger boards

12
  • 2
    The objective is to place numbers 1 through 9 with a rotation on each line that will ensure no repetitions within columns and blocks. This produces a valid solution starting with 1,2,3... on the first line. Everything else is just randomization of that baseline solution by shuffling rows, columns and numbers. To see the base pattern produced by the formula, you can change the shuffle() function to return the original range as is. – Alain T. Dec 11 '19 at 14:34
  • 2
    For a 9x9, you could build an offset array for rows: offsets = [0,3,6,1,4,7,2,5,8] and then use it with a simpler formula (offsets[r]+c)%9 in the comprehension. BTW this technique gives very fast results but it can only generate a subset (roughly 3x10^12) of the 6x10^21 possible solution board. Valid variations of the offsets table will produce additional board patterns. – Alain T. Dec 12 '19 at 19:16
  • 1
    @WhyWhat, calm down. The baseline valid solution is a simple sudoku board that is valid ( lines, columns and blocks have all 9 numbers). It can be generated by placing the numbers sequentially on the first line and then shifting them by one on the next line and by two on the 3rd line. Then similar shifting on subsequent lines taking into account the block constraints. This is what the pattern(r,c) function does (see all comments above) – Alain T. Apr 24 '20 at 20:04
  • 1
    rBase represents block numbers (0..base) and row/column numbers within a block. You can shuffle rows and columns within a block and you can shuffle blocks within the board without breaking integrity. This is why the row numbers and column numbers are formed by combining a block number with a row/col number within that group. (e.g. g*base + r) – Alain T. Jan 26 at 22:53
  • 1
    Not really. for r in shuffle(rBase) in the comprehension only shuffles the 3 rows of the current group g between themselves. Shuffling across the whole (9 row) range would break integrity between blocks. In other words, we can swap rows 0 and 2 but not rows 1 and 3 because that would move numbers across horizontal blocks 0 and 1 possibly creating duplicates within these blocks. – Alain T. Jan 27 at 15:39
1

This should work.

def sudoku(size):
    import time
    start_time=time.time()

    import sys
    import random as rn
    mydict = {}
    n = 0
    print '--started calculating--'
    while len(mydict) < 9:
        n += 1
        x = range(1, size+1)
        testlist = rn.sample(x, len(x))

        isgood = True
        for dictid,savedlist in mydict.items():
            if isgood == False:
                break
            for v in savedlist:
                if testlist[savedlist.index(v)] == v:
                    isgood = False
                    break

        if isgood == True:
            isgoodafterduplicatecheck = True
            mod = len(mydict) % 3
            dsavedlists = {}
            dtestlists = {}
            dcombindedlists = {}
            for a in range(1,mod + 1):
                savedlist = mydict[len(mydict) - a]               
                for v1 in savedlist:
                    modsavedlists = (savedlist.index(v1) / 3) % 3
                    dsavedlists[len(dsavedlists)] = [modsavedlists,v1]
                for t1 in testlist:
                    modtestlists = (testlist.index(t1) / 3) % 3
                    dtestlists[len(dtestlists)] = [modtestlists,t1]
                for k,v2 in dsavedlists.items():
                    dcombindedlists[len(dcombindedlists)] = v2
                    dcombindedlists[len(dcombindedlists)] = dtestlists[k]
            vsave = 0
            lst1 = []
            for k, vx in dcombindedlists.items():
                vnew = vx[0]
                if not vnew == vsave:
                    lst1 = []
                    lst1.append(vx[1])
                else:
                    if vx[1] in lst1:
                        isgoodafterduplicatecheck = False
                        break
                    else:
                        lst1.append(vx[1])
                vsave = vnew

            if isgoodafterduplicatecheck == True:

                mydict[len(mydict)] = testlist
                print 'success found', len(mydict), 'row'   

    print '--finished calculating--'
    total_time = time.time()-start_time
    return mydict, n, total_time

return_dict, total_tries, amt_of_time = sudoku(9)
print ''
print '--printing output--'
for n,v in return_dict.items():
    print n,v
print 'process took',total_tries,'tries in', round(amt_of_time,2), 'secs'
print '-------------------'
1
  • Hey Justin, your code is hard to understand. An explantion would be great. I have recognized that you didn't apply 3×3 subgrids check, therfore the result is wrong. Make sure to know what a sudoku is generated of at Sudoku - Wikipedia. – Youssof H. Feb 25 at 8:17
1

If your goal is to create 9 x 9 Sudoku, then why not a simpler program? Works on any of n^2 x n^2 (boards) in poly-time. To create a puzzle, you may have to remove elements manually. Guaranteeing one solution requires some backtracking. Poly-time is what you want for larger n^2 x n^2 Sudoku Latin-Squares.

#Provide a list of non-repeating n-elements to output a valid sudoku grid.
#this code runs on python3
print('enter with [1,2,3...] brackets')
tup = input()[1:-1].split(',')
    #Input required to map out valid n x m or n^2 x n^2 Sudoku Grid
x = input('Enter mapping valid Sudoku eg. 3 for 9 x 9:')
e = input('Enter 9 for 9 x 9 ...12 for 12 x 12:')
f = input('Enter 3 if its a 9 x 9 ... n^2 x n^2:')
x = int(x)
e = int(e)
f = int(f)
    #Manipulation of Elements to prepare valid grid
squares = []
for i in range(len(tup)):
      squares.append(tup[i:] + tup[:i])

        #Everything below here is just printing
for s in range(x):
          for d in range(0,e,f):
            for si in range(s,e,f):
              for li in range(d,d+f):
                print(squares[si][li], end = '')
            print('')

#Remember that if you want
#to create a single board of n^2 x n^2
#you need to edit the below
#for a valid grid
#for example
#a 9 x 9 
#would be a 3 x 3
#and so on.

No repeating elements! For grids larger than 9 x 9 please use additonal brackets for readablity. eg. [[01],[02],[03],....] Also, please remember that you need to know multiplication to output a properly mapped n^2 x n^2. For example, a 25 x 25 should be a 5 x 5 for the inputs as follows

For x, x = 5

For e, e = 25

for f, f = 5

Also, I had a buddy who helped me convert my algorithm into this python code for my amateur Sudoku project. Thanks to that Reddit user.

By the way, it's actually O(m^2) time. Proof

Thank you Reddit buddy for the help.

5
  • I don't see why you need to input x, e, f separately-- e and f should be calculated from x, and you can even calculate x from the length of the array. – lirtosiast Jul 28 '19 at 3:36
  • @lirtosiast I know its strange, but this best I got. I just started learning python. If there was a hint you can give me then I could take into consideration improving the code. By the way I just edited the answer. The code is working. Reducing inputs would be helpful. – Travis Wells Jul 28 '19 at 3:38
  • Sure, some tips on improving this answer in no particular order: (0) Specify what this does, i.e. creates an n^2 by n^2 Sudoku grid when provided a permutation of n elements; (1) the comment about constant time is a bit strange, as it's impossible to output n^4 of anything in constant time; (2) Indentation is weird. Use 4 spaces per indent level and don't randomly use extra indentation with comments; (3) just input n and remove x, f, and e, replacing x and f with n and e with n**2, (5) you never mentioned what m is, and the proof that it's O(n^4) is trivial anyway. – lirtosiast Jul 28 '19 at 4:35
  • @lirtosiast Right now, its not possible in my skillset. I'm self-taught. So I'm not able to follow the formal method. Thank you, this will help clarify it. – Travis Wells Jul 28 '19 at 5:27
  • @lirtosiast m is defined in the proof by the way. – Travis Wells Jul 28 '19 at 5:35
-2

First, randomly create a completed sudoku solution. This part require to have a sudoku solver.

From the sudoku solution, constantly remove numbers at random locations. For each removal, check if the sudoku is still valid. That is, the sudoku has a unique solution. This part needs to find out if there is more than one solution. It is another version of sudoku solver.

If not, we put back the number and try another location. The process keeps going until all locations have tried.

import random
import numpy as np

def PossibleValueAtPosition(pz:[], row:int, col:int):
    r=row//3*3
    c=col//3*3
    return {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9}.difference(set(pz[r:r+3,c:c+3].flat)).difference(set(pz[row,:])).difference(set(pz[:,col]))

def Solution_Count(pz:[], n:int, Nof_solution:int):
    if Nof_solution>1:
        return Nof_solution
    if n>=81:
        Nof_solution+=1
        return Nof_solution
    (row,col) = divmod(n,9)
    if pz[row][col]>0:
        Nof_solution = Solution_Count(pz, n+1, Nof_solution)
    else:
        l = PossibleValueAtPosition(pz, row,col)
        for v in l:
            pz[row][col] = v
            Nof_solution = Solution_Count(pz, n+1, Nof_solution)
            pz[row][col] = 0
    return Nof_solution 

def SudokuSolver(pz:[], n:int):
    if n==81:
        return True
    (row,col) = divmod(n,9)
    if pz[row][col]>0:
        if SudokuSolver(pz, n+1):
            return True
    else:
        l = list(PossibleValueAtPosition(pz, row,col))
        random.shuffle(l)
        for v in l:
            pz[row][col] = v
            if SudokuSolver(pz, n+1):
                return True
            pz[row][col] = 0
    return False

def DigHoles(pz:[], randomlist:[], n:int, nof_holes:int):
    if n>=81 or nof_holes>=64:
        return
    (row,col) = divmod(randomlist[n],9)
    if pz[row][col]>0:
        pz_check=pz.copy()
        pz_check[row][col]=0
        Nof_solution = Solution_Count(pz_check, 0, 0)
        if Nof_solution==1:
            pz[row][col]=0
            nof_holes+=1
            print(pz)
            print("{} zeros".format(nof_holes))
            print()
    DigHoles(pz, randomlist, n+1, nof_holes)

def main():
    puzzle = np.zeros((9,9), dtype=int)
    SudokuSolver(puzzle, 0)
    print(puzzle, "--------- Answer\n")
    randomlist = list(range(81))
    random.shuffle(randomlist)
    DigHoles(puzzle, randomlist, 0, 0)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()
1
  • While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. - From Review – Hemant Singh Rathore Apr 1 at 13:41

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.