3

I have this set of code that fades in and out. What I need is to repeat it over and over, endlessly as long as the page is open.

$(document).ready(function() {
    $('.one').fadeTo(500, 1);
    $('.one').fadeOut(500, 0, function(){
        $('.two').fadeTo(500, 1);
        $('.two').fadeOut(500, 0, function(){
            $('.three').fadeTo(500, 1);
            $('.three').fadeOut(500, 0, function(){
                $('.four').fadeTo(500, 1);
                $('.four').fadeOut(500, 0, function(){
                    $('.five').fadeTo(500, 1);
                    $('.five').fadeOut(500, 0, function(){
                        $('.six').fadeTo(500, 1);
                        $('.six').fadeOut(500,0);
                    }); 
                });
            });
        });
    });   
});

$(document).ready(main); 

I was thinkging of setInterval, which works, but the whole loop is 60 seconds long and setInterval doesn't start at 0 but at the time that is set.

In this case I would have to set the interval at 60000 and then wait one whole minute before the loop starts.

Is there a simpler way to start the function again? Or is there a way to start the setInterval at 0?

  • What are loop and main? – Bergi Aug 3 '17 at 15:29
  • I would go nuts if I see a code like this... – Icepickle Aug 3 '17 at 16:16
  • @Bergi sorry, I forgot to take the loop thing out. main is just the way I was taught. To run JS code on load I start with $(document).ready(function() { PUT THE CODE HERE and end with $(document).ready(main); – Ol_man_coder Aug 3 '17 at 16:19
1

This is a simple idea that takes an array of classnames. It would be easy (and maybe better) to grab the elements with a selector, but this should make it easy to use. Now you grab the first element off the array, use it to fade, and put it back on the end of the array. It should continue.

var fades = ['.one', '.two', '.three', '.four', '.five', '.six']

function fade_el() {
  //grad element from array
  let el_index = fades.shift()

  // call fades 
  $(el_index).fadeTo(500, 1)
  $(el_index).fadeOut(500, 0, function() {
    // put element back at end of array
    fades.push(el_index)

    // recurse 
    fade_el()
  })
}

$(document).ready(fade_el)
div {
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  background-color: grey;
  margin: 10px;
  display: inline-block;
  opacity: 0
  }
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div class="one"></div>
<div class="two"></div>
<div class="three"></div>
<div class="four"></div>
<div class="five"></div>
<div class="six"></div>

  • It works beautifully here. But not for me – Ol_man_coder Aug 3 '17 at 16:14
  • Should this code run once the page loads? – Ol_man_coder Aug 3 '17 at 16:16
  • @Ol_man_coder - I was running it from a script tag in the body. The edit might help if you are running it in the head. It should only need to run on page load. – Mark Meyer Aug 3 '17 at 16:26
  • thanks it works now. Now I'll take a look a the code and try to understand why it works. – Ol_man_coder Aug 3 '17 at 16:34
3

You can simply extract your anonymous function from the $document.ready(). Then, you will call it once inside your $document.ready() and then use .setInterval() to call it again and again every 60 seconds, which is what you want.

I provided a proof of concept that logs to the console every 5 seconds, as a starting point for you:

$(document).ready(function(loop) {
  loopFunction();
  window.setInterval(loopFunction, 5000);

});

var loopFunction = function(loop) {
  console.log('Runs every 5 seconds');
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

  • 1
    You could pass the enclosing function as a parameter to the last fadeOut to start it over again too, without using timeouts. – James Aug 3 '17 at 15:27
  • Don't do this. setInterval drifts, and it's possible that somewhen two elements will be animated at the same time – Bergi Aug 3 '17 at 15:31
  • @Bergi I know, if I set the setInterval at less than the total time of all the fades then the first fade starts over, and it's a mess. – Ol_man_coder Aug 3 '17 at 15:37
2

You can try using a recursive function to accomplish this.

function repeatFadeEffect(){
    $('.one').fadeTo(500, 1);
        $('.one').fadeOut(500, 0, function(){
            $('.two').fadeTo(500, 1);
            $('.two').fadeOut(500, 0, function(){
                $('.three').fadeTo(500, 1);
                $('.three').fadeOut(500, 0, function(){
                    $('.four').fadeTo(500, 1);
                    $('.four').fadeOut(500, 0, function(){
                        $('.five').fadeTo(500, 1);
                        $('.five').fadeOut(500, 0, function(){
                            $('.six').fadeTo(500, 1);
                            $('.six').fadeOut(500,0, function(){
                                // call your function again here or from where you want the process to restart
                                repeatFadeEffect();
                            });
                        }); 
                    });
                });
            });
        });   
    });
}


$(document).ready(function(){
    // call this function once to start the repeat effect.
    repeatFadeEffect();

    main();
}); 

Not clear whether you want to repeat the entire sequence, but using the recursive function call should give you the desired result.

  • Probably you want to pass the function as a callback to the last fadeOut call instead of calling it directly – Bergi Aug 3 '17 at 15:28
  • 1
    @strah No, asynchronous callbacks don't keep a stack. – Bergi Aug 3 '17 at 15:31
  • 1
    @Ol_man_coder You would put the $(document).ready call anywhere that the repeatFadeEffect function is in scope (probably the same document). Then call repeatFadeEffect from within its handler. – Matthew Lewis Aug 3 '17 at 15:59
  • 1
    @Ol_man_coder Updated the answer to reflect a more useable solution in your scenario (assumptions made). Let me know if that makes more sense. – Jako Basson Aug 3 '17 at 16:00
  • 1
    @Ol_man_coder as Matthew mentions, you should call the document.ready function to kick start the effect and the rest of your main function logic as per the updated answer. – Jako Basson Aug 3 '17 at 16:03
0

A recursive function is probably the best way to do this. Pull out the various classes into an array, and pass the fading function as a callback to fadeOut, with the next index as a parameter:

// Array of classes
var classes = ['one', 'two', 'three', 'four', 'five', 'six'];

// Fading function, takes the array index for the next class
function fadeFunc(classNum) {
  // Grab the element
  var elem = $('.' + classes[classNum]);
  // Fade in
  elem.fadeTo(500, 1, function () {
    // Fade out, passing fadeFunc the next index
    elem.fadeOut(500, 0, function () {
      fadeFunc((classNum + 1) % 6);
    });
  });
};
// Start with the first index
$(document).ready(function () {
  fadeFunc(0);
});

Here's a working example.

  • I have no idea what's going on here. – Ol_man_coder Aug 3 '17 at 16:00
  • I've changed my answer to use ES5 standards, as I'm guessing the ES6 syntax is unfamiliar. What part is causing you confusion? I'll try to explain in further depth. – Matthew Lewis Aug 3 '17 at 16:02

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