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For batch normalization during testing, how does one calculate the mean and variance of each activation input (in each layer and input dimension)? Does one record the means and variances from training, calculate the means and variances of the entire training set, or calculate the means and variances of the entire test set?

Many people say you have to precalculate the means and variances, but if you use the method of calculating the means and variances of the entire test set, wouldn't you need to calculate the means and variances of the entire test set while performing forward propagation (not "pre")?

Thank you so much for all your help!

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  • This question doesn't seem related to programming
    – Dat Nguyen
    Commented Aug 4, 2017 at 3:47

2 Answers 2

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When you are predicting on test, you always use train's statistics - be it simple transformation or batch normalization.

I'd recommend trying cs231n course to know more about this. Here is how I coded batch normalization while doing this code: github link.

If test statistics significantly differ from train, this means that test is different in general and the model won't work well. In this case you'll need to find different training data anyway. But to be more precise - when you train model on data, processed in a certain way, it won't work well on data, which is processed in a different way.

Let's imagine that there is only 1 test sample - i. e. you want to make a prediction for one client or whatever. You simply can't calculate test statistics in this case. Secondly, let's take batch normalization. Data is normalized and values now show by how many standard deviations original data differes from a certain average. So the model will use this information for training). If you normalize test data using test statistics, then values will show deviation from a different average.

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  • Cool, thank you so much for all your help! But I was just wondering, why does one always use the train's statistics? What if the training statistics are quite different from the test statistics, that is, that the means and variances on the test sets (xhat = (x - mean) / sqrt(var + eps)) are not close to zero mean and unit gaussian since training mean != test mean and training variance != test variance? Wouldn't that defeat the training purpose, which maintained zero mean and unit gaussian? Thank you very much for everything! Commented Aug 4, 2017 at 16:26
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    If test statistics significantly differ from train, this means that test is different in general and the model won't work well. In this case you'll need to find different training data anyway. But to be more precise - when you train model on data, processed in a certain way, it won't work well on data, which is processed in a different way. Commented Aug 4, 2017 at 18:35
  • I see, thank you for all your help, I really appreciate it! I am sorry for all the questions, but there will be some differences between the test statistics and train statistics, so by using the train statistics, we are processing the test data in a different way and making the train model work not as well on the test data? Thank you for everything! Commented Aug 4, 2017 at 21:18
  • Firstly, let's imagine that there is only 1 test sample - i. e. you want to make a prediction for one client or whatever. You simply can't calculate test statistics in this case. Secondly, let's take batch normalization. Data is normalized and values now show by how many standard deviations original data differes from a certain average. So the model will use this information for training). If you normalize test data using test statistics, then values will show deviation from a different average. Commented Aug 5, 2017 at 4:12
  • @user8384788 & AndreyLukyanenko Please edit the question & answer, comments are ephemeral.
    – philipxy
    Commented Aug 5, 2017 at 16:42
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A record of the empirical mean and variance is taken at training time, such as a running average, which is later used for the test set, instead of calculating the means and variances for each test batch.

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