32

In Swift 4, I'm getting this error when I try to take a Substring of a String using subscript syntax.

'subscript' is unavailable: cannot subscript String with a CountableClosedRange, see the documentation comment for discussion

For example:

let myString: String = "foobar"
let mySubstring: Substring = myString[1..<3]

Two questions:

  1. How can I resolve this error?
  2. Where is "the documentation comment for discussion" that was referred to in the error?
  • 19
    Why swift get a substring so complicated? – Kris Roofe Jan 17 '18 at 6:17
  • @KrisRoofe Somebody correct me if I'm wrong, but I think this is due to Extended Grapheme Clusters used to achieve native Unicode support. The swift Strings and Characters documentation states: >Every instance of Swift’s Character type represents a single extended grapheme cluster. An extended grapheme cluster is a sequence of one or more Unicode scalars that (when combined) produce a single human-readable character. docs.swift.org/swift-book/LanguageGuide/… – Barry Jones Mar 28 at 19:16
  • You should make simple things simple and complicated things possible. Many times Apple makes simple things complicated in order to make complicated things possible. – Bob Ueland Apr 14 at 2:53
55
  1. If you want to use subscripts on Strings like "palindrome"[1..<3] and "palindrome"[1...3], use these extensions.

Swift 4

extension String {
    subscript (bounds: CountableClosedRange<Int>) -> String {
        let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
        let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
        return String(self[start...end])
    }

    subscript (bounds: CountableRange<Int>) -> String {
        let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
        let end = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound)
        return String(self[start..<end])
    }
}

Swift 3

For Swift 3 replace with return self[start...end] and return self[start..<end].

  1. Apple didn't build this into the Swift language because the definition of a 'character' depends on how the String is encoded. A character can be 8 to 64 bits, and the default is usually UTF-16. You can specify other String encodings in String.Index.

This is the documentation that Xcode error refers to.

More on String encodings like UTF-8 and UTF-16

  • 1
    All good, except that you should have used just bounds.upperBound instead of bounds.upperBound - bounds.lowerBound as offsetBy parameter. – Zmicier Zaleznicenka Nov 8 '17 at 13:14
  • Offset should be bounds.upperBound - bounds.lowerBound. We expect "Palindrome"[3..<4] to give "i". But if we try let end = index(start, offsetBy: bounds.upperBound), we'll get "indr" instead. – p-sun Nov 9 '17 at 21:07
  • My point here is that you want startIndex and endIndex to be indices, i.e. positions of characters in a string, not distances between the characters. – Zmicier Zaleznicenka Nov 10 '17 at 12:17
  • 1
    Sorry, please discard the previous comment, I've accidentally pressed the button that should not have been pressed. Anyway, I see your point now. I was confused because you use self.startIndex parameter to initialize startIndex and startIndex parameter to initialize endIndex. If you use self.startIndex for both your bounds, you'll be able to just use bounds.upperBound for the end index offset. It would even be better to choose names different from String variables startIndex and endIndex for clarity. This will also allow you to drop all the self references. – Zmicier Zaleznicenka Nov 10 '17 at 12:24
  • Oh, I see! Nice catch, Zmicier! I edited the answer. – p-sun Nov 11 '17 at 16:01
19

Your question (and self-answer) has 2 problems:

Subscripting a string with Int has never been available in Swift's Standard Library. This code has been invalid for as long as Swift exists:

let mySubstring: Substring = myString[1..<3]

The new String.Index(encodedOffset: ) returns an index in UTF-16 (16-bit) encoding. Swift's string uses Extended Grapheme Cluster, which can take between 8 and 64 bits to store a character. Emojis make for very good demonstration:

let myString = "🇺🇸🇨🇦🇬🇧🇫🇷"
let lowerBound = String.Index(encodedOffset: 1)
let upperBound = String.Index(encodedOffset: 3)
let mySubstring = myString[lowerBound..<upperBound]

// Expected: Canadian and UK flags
// Actual  : gibberish
print(mySubstring)

In fact, getting the String.Index has not changed at all in Swift 4, for better or worse:

let myString = "🇺🇸🇨🇦🇬🇧🇫🇷"
let lowerBound = myString.index(myString.startIndex, offsetBy: 1)
let upperBound = myString.index(myString.startIndex, offsetBy: 3)
let mySubstring = myString[lowerBound..<upperBound]

print(mySubstring)
10
  1. How can I resolve this error?

This error means you can't use an Int in the subscript format – you have to use a String.Index, which you can initialize with an encodedOffset Int.

let myString: String = "foobar"
let lowerBound = String.Index.init(encodedOffset: 1)
let upperBound = String.Index.init(encodedOffset: 3)
let mySubstring: Substring = myString[lowerBound..<upperBound]
  1. Where is "the documentation comment for discussion" that was referred to in the error?

It's on GitHub in the Swift Standard Library repository in a file called UnavailableStringAPIs.swift.gyb in the bottom of a locked filing cabinet stuck in a disused lavatory with a sign on the door saying 'Beware of the Leopard'. link

  • 2
    Don't use encodedOffset here; it doesn't necessarily correspond to characters, it (currently) corresponds to UTF-16 code units (which just happens to be characters for ASCII strings). For example, with let myString = "𐐷hello", mySubstring is just 𐐷 (because that's encoded with 2 UTF-16 code units). With let myString = "🇧🇪hello", the subscripting raises a runtime error, as 🇧🇪 is encoded with 4 UTF-16 code units. Instead of using encodedOffset:, use myString.index(myString.startIndex, offsetBy: 2); which talks in terms of characters. – Hamish Aug 4 '17 at 10:57
  • (also note that String's ranged subscript returns Substring, not String in Swift 4) – Hamish Aug 4 '17 at 11:00
  • 1
    @Hamish What if I want my lowerBound to be something higher than myString.startIndex? I've updated the example to not start at 0. I suppose I could initialize a Range using init(uncheckedBounds: (lower:upper:)) and take its lower and upper bounds. I've updated the example regarding Substring. – Barry Jones Aug 4 '17 at 14:38
  • 1
    To get an index at offset 1, you can say let lowerBound = myString.index(myString.startIndex, offsetBy: 1) or let lowerBound = myString.index(after: myString.startIndex). – Hamish Aug 4 '17 at 14:50
2

Based on p-sun's answer

Swift 4

extension StringProtocol {
    subscript(bounds: CountableClosedRange<Int>) -> SubSequence {
        let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
        let end = index(start, offsetBy: bounds.count)
        return self[start..<end]
    }

    subscript(bounds: CountableRange<Int>) -> SubSequence {
        let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: bounds.lowerBound)
        let end = index(start, offsetBy: bounds.count)
        return self[start..<end]
    }
}

Notable changes:

  • Now an extension of StringProtocol. This allows adopters such as Substring to also gain these subscripts.
  • End indices are offset from the start index of the bounds rather than the start of the string. This prevents traversing from the start of the String twice. The index method is O(n) where n is the offset from i.
  • Definitely an improvement on the accepted answer IMHO. You could also use max(0, bounds.lowerBound) as the offsetBy parameter when calculating the start index to ensure that you don't accidentally try to access a negative index. – Chris Frederick Apr 26 at 2:11
  • I personally would prefer that to fail, as that is a developer error. Out of bound errors are expected with invalid indexes. If they are fixed silently I wouldn't catch the mistake. – Justin Oroz Apr 26 at 20:41
1

Building on both p-sun's and Justin Oroz's answers, here are two extensions that protect against invalid indexes beyond the start and end of a string (these extensions also avoid rescanning the string from the beginning just to find the index at the end of the range):

extension String {

    subscript(bounds: CountableClosedRange<Int>) -> String {
        let lowerBound = max(0, bounds.lowerBound)
        guard lowerBound < self.count else { return "" }

        let upperBound = min(bounds.upperBound, self.count-1)
        guard upperBound >= 0 else { return "" }

        let i = index(startIndex, offsetBy: lowerBound)
        let j = index(i, offsetBy: upperBound-lowerBound)

        return String(self[i...j])
    }

    subscript(bounds: CountableRange<Int>) -> String {
        let lowerBound = max(0, bounds.lowerBound)
        guard lowerBound < self.count else { return "" }

        let upperBound = min(bounds.upperBound, self.count)
        guard upperBound >= 0 else { return "" }

        let i = index(startIndex, offsetBy: lowerBound)
        let j = index(i, offsetBy: upperBound-lowerBound)

        return String(self[i..<j])
    }
}
0
extension String {

    subscript(bounds: CountableClosedRange<Int>) -> String {
        let lowerBound = max(0, bounds.lowerBound)
        guard lowerBound < self.count else { return "" }

        let upperBound = min(bounds.upperBound, self.count-1)
        guard upperBound >= 0 else { return "" }

        let i = index(startIndex, offsetBy: lowerBound)
        let j = index(i, offsetBy: upperBound-lowerBound)

        return String(self[i...j])
    }

    subscript(bounds: CountableRange<Int>) -> String {
        let lowerBound = max(0, bounds.lowerBound)
        guard lowerBound < self.count else { return "" }

        ***let upperBound = min(bounds.upperBound, self.count-1)***
        guard upperBound >= 0 else { return "" }

        let i = index(startIndex, offsetBy: lowerBound)
        let j = index(i, offsetBy: upperBound-lowerBound)

        return String(self[i..<j])
    }
}
0

You getting this error because result of subscript with range is Substring? not Substring.

You must use following code:

let myString: String = "foobar"
let mySubstring: Substring? = myString[1..<3]

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