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I have the Sign Bit, Exponent and Mantissa (as shown in the code below). I'm trying to take this value and turn it into the float. The goal of this is to get 59.98 (it'll read as 59.9799995)

uint32_t FullBinaryValue = (Converted[0] << 24) | (Converted[1] << 16) |
                            (Converted[2] << 8) | (Converted[3]);

unsigned int sign_bit = (FullBinaryValue & 0x80000000);
unsigned int exponent = (FullBinaryValue & 0x7F800000) >> 23;
unsigned int mantissa = (FullBinaryValue & 0x7FFFFF);

What I originally tried doing is just placing them bit by bit, where they should be as so:

float number = (sign_bit << 32) | (exponent << 24) | (mantissa);

But this gives me 2.22192742e+009.

I was then going to use the formula: 1.mantissa + 2^(exponent-127) but you can't put a decimal place in a binary number.

Then I tried grabbing each individual value for (exponent, characteristic, post mantissa) and I got

Characteristic: 0x3B (Decimal: 59)
Mantissa: 0x6FEB85 (Decimal: 7334789)
Exponent: 0x5 (Decimal: 5) This is after subtracting it from 127

I was then going to take these numbers and just retrofit it into a printf. But I don't know how to convert the Mantissa hexadecimal into how it's supposed to be (powered to a negative exponent).

Any ideas on how to convert these three variables (sign bit, exponent, and mantissa) into a floating number?

EDIT FOR PAUL R Here is the code in Minimal, Complete and Verifable format. I added the uint8_t Converted[4] there just because it is the value I end up with and it makes it runnable.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    uint8_t Converted[4];
    Converted[0] = 0x42;
    Converted[1] = 0x6f;
    Converted[2] = 0xEB;
    Converted[3] = 0x85;

    uint32_t FullBinaryValue = (Converted[0] << 24) | (Converted[1] << 16) |
                                (Converted[2] << 8) | (Converted[3]);

    unsigned int sign_bit = (FullBinaryValue & 0x80000000);
    unsigned int exponent = (FullBinaryValue & 0x7F800000) >> 23;
    unsigned int mantissa = (FullBinaryValue & 0x7FFFFF);

    float number = (sign_bit) | (exponent << 23) | (mantissa);

    return 0;
}
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  • 1
    Your shifts are off by one - try: uint32_t number = (sign_bit << 31) | (exponent << 23) | (mantissa); and then use a union or whatever to convert this to a float.
    – Paul R
    Aug 4 '17 at 17:49
  • 1
    If you are going to assume that double is implemented according to IEEE 754, it may be a good idea to verify your supposition with std::numeric_limits<double>::is_iec559. Aug 4 '17 at 17:51
  • @PaulR thanks for the quick reply. When I do that, I get 1.11463104e+009 when it should be 59.9799995
    – Rayaarito
    Aug 4 '17 at 17:51
  • I just realised your sign bit was not right-justified, like the exponent, so it would just be: uint32_t number = (sign_bit) | (exponent << 23) | (mantissa);. If that still doesn't work then post a minimal reproducible example with the latest version of your code.
    – Paul R
    Aug 4 '17 at 17:53
  • FrançoisAndrieux figured it out. Thank you for your effort @PaulR. I appreciate it
    – Rayaarito
    Aug 4 '17 at 18:08
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The problem is that the expression float number = (sign_bit << 32) | (exponent << 24) | (mantissa); first computes an unsigned int and then casts that value to float. Casting between fundamental types will preserve the value rather than the memory representation. What you are trying to do is reinterpret the memory representation as a different type. You can use reinterpret_cast.

Try this instead :

uint32_t FullBinaryValue = (Converted[0] << 24) | (Converted[1] << 16) |
                           (Converted[2] << 8) | (Converted[3]);


float number = reinterpret_cast<float&>(FullBinaryValue);
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    @Dave reinterpret_cast is used to interpret memory as a specific type, regardless of what the type system may have to say about it. As such, it can only meaningfully produce pointers and references. It doesn't cast values, it produces memory locations as if it was the given type. reinterpret_cast<float&> will take a reference to whatever you pass to it and pretend it's a reference to a float (thus the &). You could also to reinterpret_cast<float*>(&FullBinaryValue);. But you cannot use it to directly convert between value types, like reinterpret_cast<float>(FullBinaryValue);. Aug 4 '17 at 18:13
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    @pm100 It's important for this question to distinguish between (float)FullBinaryValue and *((float*)&FullBinaryValue). This solution is closer to the latter. Aug 4 '17 at 18:15
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    Does this break strict aliasing?
    – Passer By
    Aug 4 '17 at 18:19
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    @Dave See my earlier reply to pm100. It's equivalent to casting the pointer to (float*) and reading that pointer's value. Aug 4 '17 at 18:21
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    @PasserBy This answer unfortunately breaks type aliasing rules. However, implementations are allowed to relax strict aliasing rules. Additionally, floating point types memory layout is implementation defined, so it's impossible to do this in a fully portable way. You can check with your implementation rather or not this conversion is possible. A less elegant but perhaps more portable alternative may be to memcpy from a uint32_t* to a float* provided the sizes are the same. I believe it would then be implementation defined (depending on that implementation's float layout). Aug 4 '17 at 18:29

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