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I'm working on a machine learning problem in which there are many missing values in the features. There are 100's of features and I would like to remove those features that have too many missing values (it can be features with more than 80% missing values). How can I do that in Python?

My data is a Pandas dataframe.

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9 Answers 9

29

Demo:

Setup:

In [105]: df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.choice([2,np.nan], (20, 5), p=[0.2, 0.8]), columns=list('abcde'))

In [106]: df
Out[106]:
      a    b    c    d    e
0   NaN  2.0  NaN  NaN  NaN
1   NaN  NaN  2.0  NaN  2.0
2   NaN  2.0  NaN  NaN  NaN
3   NaN  NaN  NaN  NaN  2.0
4   NaN  2.0  2.0  NaN  NaN
5   NaN  NaN  NaN  NaN  NaN
6   NaN  2.0  NaN  NaN  NaN
7   2.0  2.0  NaN  NaN  NaN
8   2.0  2.0  NaN  NaN  NaN
9   NaN  NaN  NaN  NaN  NaN
10  NaN  2.0  2.0  NaN  2.0
11  NaN  NaN  NaN  2.0  NaN
12  2.0  NaN  NaN  2.0  NaN
13  NaN  NaN  NaN  2.0  NaN
14  NaN  NaN  NaN  2.0  2.0
15  NaN  NaN  NaN  NaN  NaN
16  NaN  2.0  NaN  NaN  NaN
17  2.0  NaN  NaN  NaN  2.0
18  NaN  NaN  NaN  2.0  NaN
19  NaN  2.0  NaN  2.0  NaN

In [107]: df.isnull().mean()
Out[107]:
a    0.80
b    0.55
c    0.85
d    0.70
e    0.75
dtype: float64

Solution:

In [108]: df.columns[df.isnull().mean() < 0.8]
Out[108]: Index(['b', 'd', 'e'], dtype='object')

In [109]: df[df.columns[df.isnull().mean() < 0.8]]
Out[109]:
      b    d    e
0   2.0  NaN  NaN
1   NaN  NaN  2.0
2   2.0  NaN  NaN
3   NaN  NaN  2.0
4   2.0  NaN  NaN
5   NaN  NaN  NaN
6   2.0  NaN  NaN
7   2.0  NaN  NaN
8   2.0  NaN  NaN
9   NaN  NaN  NaN
10  2.0  NaN  2.0
11  NaN  2.0  NaN
12  NaN  2.0  NaN
13  NaN  2.0  NaN
14  NaN  2.0  2.0
15  NaN  NaN  NaN
16  2.0  NaN  NaN
17  NaN  NaN  2.0
18  NaN  2.0  NaN
19  2.0  2.0  NaN
1
  • 1
    Great solution as always, +1. However, for visibility I'd say it is better to have more columns rather than rows. I added a row filter as an answer too. (or maybe just me - sitting on laptop atm)
    – Anton vBR
    Commented Aug 4, 2017 at 21:00
20

You can use Pandas' dropna().

limitPer = len(yourdf) * .80
yourdf = yourdf.dropna(thresh=limitPer, axis=1)
1
5

Following MaxU's example, this is the option for filtering rows:

    df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.choice([2,np.nan], (5,10), p=[0.2, 0.8]), columns=list('abcdefghij'))
        a    b    c    d    e    f    g    h    i    j
    0   NaN  NaN  NaN  NaN  NaN  2.0  NaN  NaN  NaN  2.0
    1   NaN  2.0  NaN  2.0  NaN  NaN  2.0  NaN  NaN  2.0
    2   NaN  NaN  2.0  NaN  2.0  NaN  2.0  2.0  NaN  NaN
    3   NaN  NaN  NaN  NaN  NaN  2.0  NaN  NaN  NaN  2.0
    4   2.0  2.0  2.0  NaN  NaN  NaN  NaN  NaN  NaN  NaN

Rows

    df.loc[df.isnull().mean(axis=1).lt(0.8)]
        a    b    c    d    e    f    g    h    i    j
    1   NaN  2.0  NaN  2.0  NaN  NaN  2.0  NaN  NaN  2.0
    2   NaN  NaN  2.0  NaN  2.0  NaN  2.0  2.0  NaN  NaN
    4   2.0  2.0  2.0  NaN  NaN  NaN  NaN  NaN  NaN  NaN
4

To generalize within Pandas you can do the following to calculate the percent of values in a column with missing values. From those columns you can filter out the features with more than 80% NULL values and then drop those columns from the DataFrame.

pct_null = df.isnull().sum() / len(df)
missing_features = pct_null[pct_null > 0.80].index
df.drop(missing_features, axis=1, inplace=True)
4

Here is a simple function which you can use directly by passing a dataframe and a threshold

def rmissingvaluecol(dff, threshold):
    l = []
    l = list(dff.drop(dff.loc[:,list((100*(dff.isnull().sum()/len(dff.index)) >= threshold))].columns, 1).columns.values)
    print("# Columns having more than %s percent missing values: "%threshold, (dff.shape[1] - len(l)))
    print("Columns:\n", list(set(list((dff.columns.values))) - set(l)))
    return l


rmissingvaluecol(df,80) # Here threshold is 80% which means we are going to drop columns having more than 80% of missing values

# Output
'''
# Columns having more than 60 percent missing values: 2
Columns:
 ['id', 'location']
'''

Now create a new dataframe excluding these columns:

l = rmissingvaluecol(df, 49)
df1 = df[l]

Bonus step

You can find the percentage of missing values for each column (optional)

def missing(dff):
    print (round((dff.isnull().sum() * 100/ len(dff)),2).sort_values(ascending=False))

missing(df)

# Output
'''
id          83.33
location    83.33
owner       16.67
pets        16.67
dtype: float64
'''
3
  • Is there anyway to store all these in a dataframe?
    – Tinkinc
    Commented Mar 21, 2022 at 18:38
  • It is there already.... l = rmissingvaluecol(df, 49) df1 = df[l]
    – Suhas_Pote
    Commented Mar 22, 2022 at 14:06
  • Thanks. that saves the columns that are left. Can I store the columns being removed too?
    – Tinkinc
    Commented Mar 22, 2022 at 14:41
2

The fastest way to find the sum of NaN or the percentage by columns is:

  • for the sum: df.isna().sum()
  • for the percentage: df.isna().mean()
1
def show_null_columns(data, agg, threshold):
    if agg == 'sum':
       null_cols = data.isnull().sum()
    elif agg == 'mean':
       null_cols = data.isnull().mean()
    columns = data.columns
    null_dic = {}
    for col,x in zip(columns, null_cols):
        if x>= threshold:
            null_dic[col] = x
    return null_dic

null_dic = show_null_columns(train, 'mean', 0.8)
train2 = train.drop(null_dic.keys(), axis=1)
0
0

Use:

df = df[df.isnull().sum(axis=1) <= 5]

Here we remove the missing values from the rows having greater than five missing values.

0

One thing about dropna() according to the documentation: the thresh argument specifies the number of non-NaNs to keep.

6
  • Welcome to StackOverflow. This seems more like a comment than an answer. Please consider commenting on the answer you like the best.
    – rajah9
    Commented Feb 15, 2021 at 14:59
  • I did try that, but I don't seem to have enough "reputation" yet. However, I think the point I mentioned can change the output of dropna().
    – ricecooker
    Commented Feb 15, 2021 at 15:03
  • Hang in there. It won't be long before you can make comments.
    – rajah9
    Commented Feb 15, 2021 at 15:11
  • Thanks for the words of encouragement!
    – ricecooker
    Commented Feb 15, 2021 at 15:12

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