10

I know this is a duplicate Q but I can't seem to find the post again

Using the following data

df <- data.frame(A=c(1,1,2,2),B=c(NA,2,NA,4),C=c(3,NA,NA,5),D=c(NA,2,3,NA),E=c(5,NA,NA,4))

  A  B  C  D  E
  1 NA  3 NA  5
  1  2 NA  2 NA
  2 NA NA  3 NA
  2  4  5 NA  4

Grouping by A, I'd like the following output using a tidyverse solution

  A  B  C  D  E
  1  2  3  2  5
  2  4  5  3  4

I have many groups in A. I think I saw an answer using coalesce but am unsure how to get it work. I'd like a solution that works with characters as well. Thanks!

8

I haven't figured out how to put the coalesce_by_column function inside the dplyr pipeline, but this works:

coalesce_by_column <- function(df) {
  return(coalesce(df[1], df[2]))
}

df %>%
  group_by(A) %>%
  summarise_all(coalesce_by_column)

##       A     B     C     D     E
##   <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl>
## 1     1     2     3     2     5
## 2     2     4     5     3     4

Edit: include @Jon Harmon's solution for more than 2 members of a group

# Supply lists by splicing them into dots:
coalesce_by_column <- function(df) {
  return(dplyr::coalesce(!!! as.list(df)))
}

df %>%
  group_by(A) %>%
  summarise_all(coalesce_by_column)

#> # A tibble: 2 x 5
#>       A     B     C     D     E
#>   <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl>
#> 1     1     2     3     2     5
#> 2     2     4     5     3     4
  • Please see my updated example and I have edited my post to indicate that I have many groups in A, which is why I wanted a dplyr chained solution – CPak Aug 4 '17 at 21:08
  • 3
    From the dplyr::coalesce help: # Supply lists by splicing them into dots: vecs <- list( c(1, 2, NA, NA, 5), c(NA, NA, 3, 4, 5) ) coalesce(!!! vecs) So, based on that, I got coalesce_by_column to work for more than 2 members of a group: coalesce_by_column <- function(df) { return(dplyr::coalesce(!!! as.list(df))) } Hope that helps! – Jon Harmon Feb 12 '18 at 15:11
5

Not tidyverse but here's one base R solution

df <- data.frame(A=c(1,1),B=c(NA,2),C=c(3,NA),D=c(NA,2),E=c(5,NA))
sapply(df, function(x) x[!is.na(x)][1])
#A B C D E 
#1 2 3 2 5 

With updated data

do.call(rbind, lapply(split(df, df$A), function(a) sapply(a, function(x) x[!is.na(x)][1])))
#  A B C D E
#1 1 2 3 2 5
#2 2 4 5 3 4
  • Thanks, this could work in a mutate statement. I'll wait for a few other answers nonetheless – CPak Aug 4 '17 at 21:01
3

Here is an even more general solution (using unique, na.omit to sort of create coalesce), which can handle more than two rows with overlapping information. Super simply and forward.

> df <- data.frame(A=c(1,1,2,2,2),B=c(NA,2,NA,4,4),C=c(3,NA,NA,5,NA),D=c(NA,2,3,NA,NA),E=c(5,NA,NA,4,4))

> df
  A  B  C  D  E
1 1 NA  3 NA  5
2 1  2 NA  2 NA
3 2 NA NA  3 NA
4 2  4  5 NA  4
5 2  4 NA NA  4

> df %>% group_by(A) %>% summarise_all(funs( na.omit(unique(.)) ))
# A tibble: 2 x 5
      A     B     C     D     E
  <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl>
1     1     2     3     2     5
2     2     4     5     3     4
1

We can use fill to fill all the missing values. And then filter just one row for each group.

library(dplyr)
library(tidyr)

df2 <- df %>%
  group_by(A) %>%
  fill(everything(), .direction = "down") %>%
  fill(everything(), .direction = "up") %>%
  slice(1)
1

A different tidyverse possibility could be:

df %>%
 gather(var, val, -A, na.rm = TRUE) %>%
 group_by(A, var) %>%
 distinct(val) %>%
 spread(var, val)

      A     B     C     D     E
  <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl>
1     1     2     3     2     5
2     2     4     5     3     4

Here it, first, performs a wide-to-long data-transformation, excluding the "A" column and removing the missing values. Second, it groups by "A" column and the variable names. Third, it removes the duplicate values. Finally, it returns the data to its original wide format.

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