3

Let's say I have a simple function that checks a condition and returns true if the condition is true and false if the condition is false.

Is it better to use this type of code:

bool myfunction( /*parameters*/ ) {
    if ( /*conditional statement*/ ) {
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

Or this type:

bool myfunction( /*parameters*/ ) {
    if ( /*conditional statement*/ ) {
        return true;
    }
    else return false;
}

Or does it just really not make a difference? Also, what considerations should I bear in mind when deciding whether to "if...else if" vs. "if...else" vs. "switch"?

  • 7
    Why not simply return conditional_expression;? – Some programmer dude Aug 5 '17 at 6:07
  • As a modeling tool perspective if you reverse engineer ..the second will give you both the paths – Hariom Singh Aug 5 '17 at 6:10
  • @Someprogrammerdude Because that would make too much sense. :P – Adam Gluntz Aug 5 '17 at 6:13
  • 1
    I think it is best to just return the conditional expression (in a simple function with one condition), since it already equals true or false. In a more complex function checking multiple conditions which all have to pass, it is best to have several if ( /*not conditional statement*/ ) { return false; } and at the end return true;. Otherwise, you would be left with a lot of else if statements, which is really not that clear to read. – MarthyM Aug 5 '17 at 6:34
8

You can also write this without any conditional at all:

bool myfunction( /*parameters*/ ) {
    return /*conditional statement*/;
 }

This way you avoid the conditional entirely.

Of course, if you are dealing with a different function where you need the conditional, it shouldn't make a difference. Modern compilers work well either way.

As far as using switch vs if-else, switch adds efficiency when you have many cases by allowing you to jump to a single one, making execution faster by not running all cases. At a low (hardware/compiler level), switch statements allow you to make a single check/jump, where if you had many if statements, you would need to make many checks/jumps.

1

It is the same. Remember whenever you say

return boolean;

the function ends and return to its calling line. Therefore putting it inside else or just simply putting it is same.

say we want to check the prime

bool isPrime (int n){
     for (int i = 2; i <= sqrt(n); i++){
         if (n % i == 0)
             return false;
     }
     return true;
}

if you see the function closely you will know if the number is divided properly with any value in range of sqrt(n) it will return false as the number is not a prime.. if it cannot be divided then the loop will end without any interference and said the number to be a prime. hence forth the function works properly.

  • please be specific – Tanuj Yadav Aug 5 '17 at 6:24
  • I meant it is better to put condition to return the value that you are looking for. For example you know your case is true for certain condition and false for every other. Then in the function put only the condition that full fills the true in such way you will be at ease of writing tons of codes. And clean code. – Shafi Aug 5 '17 at 23:03
  • You want to compute sqrt outside of the loop and not assume that it will be optimized by the compiler. – Phil1970 Jun 8 '18 at 0:08
  • I know that. Thanks for pointing out though. I just wanted to make him understand. – Shafi Jun 11 '18 at 4:52
1

Since neither of two given answers are hitting the nail, i will give you another one.

From the code (or compiler's) view, assuming recent compiler both versions are identical. Compiler will optimise if version to return version just fine. Difference is in debugging - the debugger you're using might not allow you to set breakpoint on return value (for example if you want to set breakpoint on only returning true values). While if version give you two return statements on different lines and any sane debugger will set breakpoint on line just fine.

  • But I would do that only when useful for debugging… I would not do it just in case I might need it someday while debugging. And for debugging you could also use a variable for the return value and a conditional breakpoint. – Phil1970 Jun 8 '18 at 0:13
  • That's correct. Setting conditional breakpoint is much more harder (or rather annoying) in - for example - gdb. Thus minor workflow optimization. – Radosław Cybulski Nov 14 '18 at 17:15
0

Both functions are identical, regardless of any optimizations applied by the compiler, because the "else" in the second function hasn't any effect. If you leave the function as soon as the condition is met, you'll never enter the other branch in this case, so the "else" is implicit in the first version. Hence I'd prefer the first version, because the "else" in the other one is misleading.

However, I agree with others here that this kind of function (both variants) doesn't make sense anyway, because you can simply use the plain boolean condition instead of this function, which is just a needless wrapper.

0

In terms of compilation the specific form you choose for if-else syntax won't make a big difference. The optimization path will usually erase any differences. Your decision should be made based on visual form instead.

As others have pointed out already, if you have a simple condition like this it's best to just return the calculation directly and avoid the if statement.

Returning directly only works if you have a boolean calculation. You might instead need to return a different type:

int foo(/*args*/) {
  if(/*condition*/) {
     return bar();
  }
  return 0;
}

Alternately you could use the ternary operator ?:, but if the expressions, it may not be as clear.

By using short returns (evaluation doesn't reach the end of the function) you can also sequence several conditions and evaluations.

int foo(/*args*/) {
  if(/*condition1*/) {
     return 0;
  }

  if(/*condition2*/) {
     return 3;
  }

  int common = bar(/*args*/);
  if(/*condition3*/) {
     return 1-common;
  }

  return common;
}

Pick the form based on what makes the most logical sense, just ignore how this might compile. Then consider massaging the form to have the least visual complexity (avoids too much indentation or deep branching).

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