3

If I have a dataframe that looks like

    value   otherstuff
0     4         x
0     5         x
0     2         x
1     2         x
2     3         x
2     7         x

what is a succinct way to get a new dataframe that looks like

    value   otherstuff
0     5         x
1     2         x
2     7         x

where rows with the same index have been dropped so only the row with the maximum 'value' remains? As far as I am aware there is no option in df.drop_duplicates to keep the max, only the first or last occurrence.

5

You can use max with level=0:

df.max(level=0)

Output:

   value otherstuff
0      5          x
1      2          x
2      7          x

OR, to address other columns mentioned in comments:

df.groupby(level=0,group_keys=False)\
  .apply(lambda x: x.loc[x['value']==x['value'].max()])

Output:

   value otherstuff
0      5          x
1      2          x
2      7          x
5
  • This works for his example but not in general. Presumably he wants the max only with respect to the value column.
    – miradulo
    Aug 6 '17 at 1:00
  • This is accomplishing the desired filter, but is actually dropping the other columns in the dataframe. Aug 6 '17 at 1:12
  • After the edit, this works beautifully, though it is slower than Mitch's solution. This method retains duplicates (which I didn't realize I had, so great) Aug 6 '17 at 2:00
  • super late, but how would you save the values left out to a new dataframe?
    – Murcielago
    Jan 10 '20 at 15:45
  • @LeLionJaune I am sorry, but I don't understand your desired result. Can you reexplain? Jan 10 '20 at 17:08
4

You can use groupby.transform to calculate the maximum value per group and then compare the value column with the maximum, if true, keep the rows:

df[df.groupby(level=0).value.transform('max').eq(df.value)]

#    value  otherstuff
#0       5           x
#1       2           x
#2       7           x
2
  • 1
    This is the best I think. I believe you can just have value.max() as opposed to transform though :)
    – miradulo
    Aug 6 '17 at 2:09
  • @Mitch Hmm. That does seem to work. But the performance is affected on large data set (probably due to the join process incurred by the unequal length).
    – Psidom
    Aug 6 '17 at 2:42
2

You could sort by value to ensure you will take the maximum, then group by the index and take the first member for each group.

(df.sort_values(by='value', ascending=False)
   .groupby(level=0)
   .head(1)
   .sort_index())

Which yields

   value otherstuff
0      5          x
1      2          x
2      7          x
4
  • This is fantastic and fast, though it drops duplicates. Aug 6 '17 at 2:00
  • @JakeMorris ahh I didn't see you wanted to keep duplicates. Maybe I'll think some more about this.
    – miradulo
    Aug 6 '17 at 2:02
  • I didn't realize I had any, actually. When the dataframe I got trying your method was 2 rows smaller than the dataframe I got trying Scott Boston's, I did a delta and realized there are duplicates. My real 'value' column is so precise I didn't even think I'd have the same value again. Aug 6 '17 at 2:06
  • In that case Psidom's answer is probably best.
    – miradulo
    Aug 6 '17 at 2:08
0

Without groupby you can suing sort_values and drop_duplicates

df2['INDEX'] = df2.index
df2.sort_values(['INDEX', 'value'],ascending=[True,False]).
    drop_duplicates(['INDEX'],keep='first')

Out[47]: 
   value otherstuff  INDEX
0      5          x      0
1      2          x      1
2      7          x      2

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