31

I have this HTML code:

<div class="header">
<div class="desc">Description</div>
<div class="logo"><img src=""/></div>
<div class="navbar"></div></div>

.header has a height of 150px. .navbar has a height of 20px. When the user scrolls, I want .navbar to stick at the top. So I went to the CSS and set position:sticky and top:0. But this didn't work. I initially thought that firefox is not supporting position:sticky, but that's not the case because I was able to see a working demo of it. I googled about it but found nothing helpful. Anyone knows why this is not working?

6
  • 7
    Since you don't show your css... Sticky only works if the containing div (header) does not have overflow hidden or auto. Might be something to check. Aug 6 '17 at 9:18
  • 28
    For anyone else looking into this, position: sticky also often doesn't work if the immediate parent is display: flex Jan 17 '18 at 20:02
  • 4
    Not really true. Look at the example in this blog: alligator.io/css/position-sticky The container is a flex element, yet working fine.
    – Roy
    Jul 16 '20 at 19:11
  • 6
    I agree with @user56reinstatemonica8. Just wanna add something, it also doesn't work if not only the immediate parent but also any parent or grandfather up to the top element has property like overflow: hidden or overflow: auto. I came to this conclusion after a lot of head bashing. Jan 9 at 8:20
  • 2
    The "grandfather" mentioning really helps! Thank you @DebuShinobi Feb 26 at 8:06
73

For anyone else that comes across this, position sticky was not working for me due to the body element having overflow-x: hidden; set.

8
  • 12
    You just saved me a lot of time. Was doing some restyling and couldn't figure out for the life of me why position sticky stopped working. Turns out a 3rd party was adding overflow styles on html and body. Ugh! Jan 15 '18 at 6:44
  • 1
    Here's a bug report about this bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=1329203 Sep 11 '18 at 13:37
  • 1
    which basically means e.g. overflow:initial !important on some problematic parent could work or one could test it with it Mar 27 '19 at 12:40
  • 4
    Just want to clarify that is not just with overflow-x, it's with ANY overflow property, like overflow-x, overflow-y or overflow shorthand. Apr 15 '19 at 13:21
  • 2
    What if I need overflow-x: hidden on body for something else?
    – Cook88
    Jul 29 '20 at 21:22
33

It works fine if you move the navbar outside the header. See below. For the reason, according to MDN:

The element is positioned according to the normal flow of the document, and then offset relative to its flow root and containing block based on the values of top, right, bottom, and left.

For the containing block:

The containing block is the ancestor to which the element is relatively positioned

So, when I do not misunderstand, the navbar is positioned at offset 0 within the header as soon as it is scrolled outside the viewport (which, clearly, means, you can't see it anymore).

.navbar {
  background: hotpink;
  width: 100%;
  height: 50px;
  position: -webkit-sticky;
  position: sticky;
  top: 0;
}

.header {
  height: 150px;
  background: grey;
}

body {
  height: 800px;
  position: relative;
}
<div class="header">
<div class="desc">Description</div>
<div class="logo"><img src=""/></div>
</div>

<div class="navbar"></div>

1
  • 3
    With the navbar as element of the header like in the question, it is sticky, too. But only until its container ends. Initially it is visible right below "Description" and it will move through the grey header as you scroll down. At the end of the grey area, it will stop as the container (=header) ends. In this answer, the navbar container is body, so this is why it will initially start after the grey header and scroll all the way down. Oct 4 '17 at 12:15
27

The 2 most common culprits why position: sticky; might not work are:

  1. You haven't defined top: 0;, bottom: 0;, left: 0 or something similar
  2. One of the parents of your sticky element has overflow (x or y) set to hidden, scroll or auto.

For me it was the first one.

1
  • 4
    For me overflow-x: hidden on the body was the reason - thanks for your hint!
    – dude
    Nov 6 '20 at 16:57
9

To expand from the answers above and some information to make it work with flexbox parent and overflow other than visible (the examples below assume you use vertical - sticky with either top or bottom set to a certain value and position set to sticky):

  1. The most frequent case is you have an ancestor element (not just immediate parent) with overflow property set to something other than visible and as a result there is no space is left to stick around. To quickly find out if this is the case, you can run this script in the browser console (please make sure you change the .your-sticky-element class to your element's selector):

     var stickyElement = document.querySelector('.your-sticky-element');
     var parent = stickyElement.parentElement;
     while (parent) {
         var hasOverflow = getComputedStyle(parent).overflow;
         if(hasOverflow != 'visible') {
             console.log(hasOverflow, parent);
         }
         parent = parent.parentElement;
     } 
    

    SOLUTION:

    a) If you found there is overflow set, and you can remove it, this should solve it

    b) If you have to keep your overflow setting, you have to make the parent element's height higher than the sticky element's height. If the parent element has no height or the sticky element fills up all the height, it means there is simply no place to stick within when the page is scrolled. It doesn't need to an explicit height (vertical), but you can inspect to see if your sticky element has extra space left after itself.

  2. Parent is not higher than the sticky element to leave extra space. This particular case can be caused by different circumstances but the solution to this is the same above, please see 1.b

  3. If your sticky element's parent is a flexbox (align-items has default value of normal) and if the sticky element itself doesn't have a proper align-self set, there will be no space left for the sticky element to hold when scrolling (for example, if it is align-self: stretch or auto [default value]). This is because the child element is stretched to fill up the height of the parent.

    SOLUTION:

    In this case, align-self: flex-start set for the sticky element can fix the problem because in the element will stand at the start, leaving extra space after itself.

Guide: There are much more complex circumstances both in the case of flexboxes and without it, but the general rule of thumb is your sticky element needs space within the parent to be sticky when scrolled.

1
  • I don't know what kind of wizardry this is, but it worked!! Apr 23 at 23:27
3

Somehow your code only works when the .navbar element is not inside another container like the header. I moved it out and then it works fine. I created a codepen snippet for that, check it out

<header>
    <div class="logo">Logo</div>
    <div class="description"><div>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipisicing elit. Quo, veritatis.</div></div>
</header>
<div class="navbar">
    <ul>
        <li><a href="#">navitem1</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">navitem2</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">navitem3</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">navitem4</a></li>
    </ul>
</div>

Right now position:sticky is supported quite good as you can see on canIuse. Of course IE currently has no support but the new Edge version will bring full support for this! I found some interesting articles about this topic:

But there are good news on the horizon. I think better browser support will follow the next time.

0
1

Your HTML code as it is

<div class="header">
<div class="desc">Description</div>
<div class="logo"><img src=""/></div>
<div class="navbar"></div></div>

and write CSS class for navigation bar

.header {
height: 150px;
background-color: #d1d1d1;
}

.navbar {
  background: #999;
  border-bottom: 1px solid #333;
  border-top: 1px solid #333;
  color: #FFF;
  margin: 0;
  padding: 2px 0 0 12px;
  position: -webkit-sticky;
  position: sticky;
  top: -1px;
}

Hope this will help

2
  • I already tried this, without any succes. I tried to add position:sticky and top:0 to the .header element and it works, but that's not what I want.
    – Wolfuryo
    Aug 6 '17 at 9:15
  • I tried moving out the navbar from the header container, it is working
    – M Thomas
    Aug 6 '17 at 9:29
1

Adding more content after nav inside header provides sticky behavior, but only for a moment - if the user scrolls down too much, nav will disappear with header, since it can't jump out below header's bottom border.

Thus, the only solution with pure CSS is to put nav inside element that is partially visible even after the user scrolls to the bottom of the page (directly inside body or inside some sort of container that spans to the bottom of the page or at least to the footer).

If this solution is not possible, the other way is to use JavaScript. Before transitioning to CSS, I used the following code (found similar jQuery solution somewhere long time ago, don't remember where, so the credit goes to the anonymous author; Vanilla JS can be easily obtained from this):

$(document).ready(function () {
    var sticky_navigation_offset_top = $('nav').offset().top;
    var sticky_navigation = function () {
        var scroll_top = $(window).scrollTop();
        if (scroll_top > sticky_navigation_offset_top) {
            $('nav').css({
                'position': 'fixed',
                'top': 0,
                'left': 0,
                'right': 0,
                'margin-left': 'auto',
                'margin-right': 'auto'
            });
        } else {
            $('nav').css({
                'position': 'relative'
            });
        }
    };
    sticky_navigation();
    $(window).scroll(function () {
        sticky_navigation();
    });
});
0

Met some not evident behaviour of horizontal sticky: if width is 100%, then sticky does not work. Width should be less, then container size.

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