7

Suppose I have the variable x that was generated using the following approach:

x <- rgamma(100,2,11) + rnorm(100,0,.01) #gamma distr + some gaussian noise

    head(x,20)
 [1] 0.35135058 0.12784251 0.23770365 0.13095612 0.18796901 0.18251968
 [7] 0.20506117 0.25298286 0.11888596 0.07953969 0.09763770 0.28698417
[13] 0.07647302 0.17489578 0.02594517 0.14016041 0.04102864 0.13677059
[19] 0.18963015 0.23626828

How could I fit a gamma distribution to it?

5
  • 2
    See function MASS::fitdistr. Aug 6, 2017 at 20:22
  • 3
    Sorry, I've just seen your data more closely, and its graph. Why would you want to fit a gamma to it? all.equal(seq(0, 1, by = 0.01), x) returns TRUE. Aug 6, 2017 at 20:36
  • @RuiBarradas -- thanks -- let me update the question -- I generated the data by adding a small amount of gaussian noise to gamma deviates -- let me post that in the notes Aug 6, 2017 at 21:07
  • @RuiBarradas -- updated teh question thanks. Aug 6, 2017 at 21:20
  • there is an example of doing MLE for a Gaussian-contaminated Gamma sample of this sort in my book (page 433), although I doubt it'll work well for this data set -- the standard dev of the Gaussian component is prob. too small to distinguish it.
    – Ben Bolker
    Aug 7, 2017 at 18:23

3 Answers 3

12

A good alternative is the fitdistrplus package by ML Delignette-Muller et al. For instance, generating data using your approach:

set.seed(2017)
x <- rgamma(100,2,11) + rnorm(100,0,.01)
library(fitdistrplus)
fit.gamma <- fitdist(x, distr = "gamma", method = "mle")
summary(fit.gamma)

Fitting of the distribution ' gamma ' by maximum likelihood 
Parameters : 
       estimate Std. Error
shape  2.185415  0.2885935
rate  12.850432  1.9066390
Loglikelihood:  91.41958   AIC:  -178.8392   BIC:  -173.6288 
Correlation matrix:
          shape      rate
shape 1.0000000 0.8900242
rate  0.8900242 1.0000000


plot(fit.gamma)

enter image description here

2
  • 1
    There might be a problem with this solution. There are negative values of x. sum(x < 0)returns 5. MASS::fitdistr when applied to this vector gives an error: Error in fitdistr(x, "gamma") : gamma values must be >= 0. So maybe package fitdistrplus is doing all the checks it should. Aug 6, 2017 at 21:37
  • @RuiBarradas, thanks. good point. Edited above. The function does not accept negative values. Aug 6, 2017 at 22:13
4

You could try to quickly fit Gamma distribution. Being two-parameters distribution one could recover them by finding sample mean and variance. Here you could have some samples to be negative as soon as mean is positive.

set.seed(31234)
x <- rgamma(100, 2.0, 11.0) + rnorm(100, 0, .01) #gamma distr + some gaussian noise
#print(x)

m <- mean(x)
v <- var(x)

print(m)
print(v)

scale <- v/m
shape <- m*m/v

print(shape)
print(1.0/scale)

For me it prints

> print(shape)
[1] 2.066785
> print(1.0/scale)
[1] 11.57765
> 
1
  • 3
    true (this approach is called the "method of moments") but I would want to be very careful papering over cracks (presence of negative values in what is purportedly a Gamma-distributed sample) in this way ...
    – Ben Bolker
    Aug 7, 2017 at 18:13
1

You could also try to quickly and efficiently fit Gamma distribution with the Le Cam one-step estimation procedure using the onestep command in the OneStep package.

library(OneStep)
x <- rgamma(100,2,11) + rnorm(100,0,.01)
onestep(x,"gamma")

Parameters:
       estimate
shape  2.155451
rate  11.679060

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.