6

The nested builder patterns that I've come across online usually have something like this:

class Person{

    private int id;
    private String name;
    private int age;
    ... so on

    private Person(Builder builder){
        this.id = builder.id;
        this.name = builder.name;
        this.age = builder.age;
    }

    public static class Builder{

        private int id;
        private String name;
        private int age;
        ... so on

        public Builder id(int id){
            this.id = id;
            return this;
        }
        public Builder name(String name){
             this.name = name;
             return this;
        }
        .... so on

        public Person build(){
            return new Person(this);
        }

    }

}

My question is, is it necessary to duplicate fields in Person and Builder? It seems like a lot of redundant code. And my second question is, would the following code be a viable replacement, why or why not?

class Person{

    private int id;
    private String name;
    private int age;
    ... so on

    private Person(){}

    public static class Builder{

        private Person person = new Person();

        public Builder id(int id){
            this.person.id = id;
            return this;
        }
        public Builder name(String name){
             this.person.name = name;
             return this;
        }
        .... so on

        public Person build(){
            return person;
        }
        // UPDATED -- another build method
        public Person build(){
            Person built = this.person;
            this.person = new Person();
            return built;
        }

    }

}

Note: I understand this topic may be opinionated and there may not be a "right" answer, but I just want to hear different ideas and opinions. I'm not looking for the ultimate truth.

14
  • 2
    In the second instance you have completely defeated the point of the builder. A builder builds complete, valid and immutable instances - yours now does none of those things. What's even worse is that the builder can mutate the built object after build is called. I don't see any problem with the "duplicated fields" - but your proposed alternative is just awful. Aug 6 '17 at 21:16
  • i see what you mean thanks for the feedback Aug 6 '17 at 21:18
  • 1
    what first comment said is not right IMHO. A builder can do whatever it needs to do before the build method is called. And your code does not prove to be wrong or right (it depends on the code you don't show). a builder can mutate an object as it wants to while is on the process of being built. The only MUST is that noone outside the builder must be able to modify it, and also that once build method is called noone at all (not even the builder) can modify it. The members of Person you show are private and immutable so everything is fine. The key here is if you have a public setter or not.
    – albert_nil
    Aug 6 '17 at 21:27
  • @BoristheSpider why do you say the object can be modified sfter build is called? the code shown does not prove that. before doing so contundent comments (and with subjective adjectives like "awful") i would just read carefuly the design.
    – albert_nil
    Aug 6 '17 at 21:45
  • 1
    @albert_nil If you used that implementation to build a Person like so: Builder b = new Person.Builder(); Person p = b.name("foo").build();, a call to e.g. b.name("bar"); would change the name of p. That's really undesirable.
    – oowekyala
    Aug 6 '17 at 21:53
3

Your code would be fine as long as:

  1. you keep your Person member variables private (you are doing so)
  2. you don't provide methods that allow modification of those member variables (the code you show does not do, but you have omitted parts of it)
  3. those member variables are immutable or you ensure getters provide copies of them. usually better that the members are already immutable (hint: even java collections). otherwise you will be creating instances on each getX call.
  4. once Builder.build is called, noone must be able to modify Person instance state, not even Builder itself. this is not happening in the code you posted
  5. builder does not expose "temporal instance" being built (if any at all). No instance must be exposed aside the return of build method.

there are opinions about which is the preferred way or not, matter of taste most of the time. But in terms of being right or not, that approach would be fine with some modifications. At the end, what happens before the build is called is purely internal to the Builder. It's an implementation matter. The important thing is that the previous rules are met.

To fix rule 4: your Builder.build method should return a deep clone of the temp instance being used (there are ways to achcieve that without needing to specify each field). Or, you should have a flag in builder that forbids calling any other method on Builder instance, once build has been called.

Side note: i usually prefer that Builder class also uses private constructor. I would have this on Person class:

public static Builder builder() {
    return new Builder();
}

This can give you more flexibility on the way to initialize the Builder, or even you can have several builder methods doing not exactly the same stuff in terms of "preconfiguring" the builder (and since they are methods, you have more flexibility on naming than on constructors :) )

8
  • As described above; code is not fine. In fact, specifically, it violates your point 4. Aug 6 '17 at 21:53
  • 1
    you are right, i didn't noticed build was returning person instance as is. It should return a clone/copy or at least have a flag in builder to forbid calling any other builder instance method after build is called. Will update answer
    – albert_nil
    Aug 6 '17 at 22:07
  • 1
    @user265732 regarding your concern about instance created before build method, i would say this can make a difference depending on your specific Builder needs. If your build method will do some validations that would prevent object to be created always, then this could be an important difference. But if it's not the case (Builder just used as a way to reach immutability while still being able to fill instance on several steps), then it should not be a difference at all: you will probably call the build method if you start filling a builder. But it's true that it might be important.
    – albert_nil
    Aug 6 '17 at 22:17
  • 1
    @albert_nil you mention that if the builder is meant to achieve immutability it does not matter whether the instance is created in the build method or before. But calling the constructor in the build method enables you to make the fields of Person final, which I'd argue is safer and makes less boilerplate than providing private setters for those fields
    – oowekyala
    Aug 6 '17 at 23:19
  • 1
    @Oowekyala i didn't say to provide private setters, i said to not provide public setters. You can remove setters at all. i agree that generally speaking is prefersble final members (along with more safety measures). It's one of the downs. Not saying this approach is better than others, just that is valid. It has its pros and cons IMHO
    – albert_nil
    Aug 7 '17 at 5:49

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