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In Windows command line I am trying to fix broken lines that happen in certain field separated by "|". In some business systems free text fields allow users to input return and these sometimes break the record line when the transaction is extracted.

I have GAWK(GNU Awk 3.1.0) and SED(GNU sed version 4.2.1) from UnxUtils and GnuWin. My data is as follows:

smith|Login|command line is my friend|2
oliver|Login|I have no idea 
why I am here|10
dennis|Payroll|are we there yet?|100
smith|Time|going to have some fun|200
smith|Logout|here I come|10

The second line is broken due to reason explained in the first paragraph. Return at the end of broken line 2 is a regular Windows return and looks like x0D x0A in a hex editor.

While removing using sed or gawk instead of /n or /r type notations I would like to be able use a hex value(more than one is the case) to add more flexibility. The code should be able to replace it with something only if it appears in the third column. Only sed or (x)awk should be used. For gawk "sed style" on the fly replacing( as with -i parameter) method if possible would be helpful.

Tried the following but does not capture anything:

gawk -F "|" "$3 ~ /\x0D\x0A/" data.txt

Also tried replacing with

gawk -F "|" "{gsub(/\x0d\x0a/, \x20, $3); print }" OFS="|" data.txt

or

sed "s/\x0dx0a/\x20/g" data.txt

(was able to capture x20(space) with sed but no luck with returns)

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It's not entirely clear what you're trying to do (why would you want to replace line endings with a blank char???) but this might get you on the right path:

awk -v RS='\r\n' -v ORS=' ' '1' file

and if you want inplace editing just add -i inplace up front.

This is all gawk-only for inplace editing and multi-char RS. You may also need to add -v BINMODE=3 (also gawk-only) depending on the platform you're running on to stop the underlying C primitives from stripping the \rs before gawk sees them.

Hang on, I see you're on gawk 3.1.0 - that is 5+ years out of date, upgrade your gawk version to get access to the latest bug fixes and features (including -i inplace).

Hang on 2 - are you actually trying to replace the newlines within records with a blank char? That's even simpler:

awk 'BEGIN{RS=ORS="\r\n"} {gsub(/\n/," ")} 1' file

For example (added a \s* before \n as your input has trailing white space that I assume you also want removed):

$ cat -v file
smith|Login|command line is my friend|2^M
oliver|Login|I have no idea
why I am here|10^M
dennis|Payroll|are we there yet?|100^M
smith|Time|going to have some fun|200^M
smith|Logout|here I come|10^M

$ awk 'BEGIN{RS=ORS="\r\n"} {gsub(/\s*\n/," ")} 1' file | cat -v
smith|Login|command line is my friend|2^M
oliver|Login|I have no idea why I am here|10^M
dennis|Payroll|are we there yet?|100^M
smith|Time|going to have some fun|200^M
smith|Logout|here I come|10^M

or to use UNIX line endings in the output instead of DOS just don't set ORS:

$ awk 'BEGIN{RS="\r\n"} {gsub(/\s*\n/," ")} 1' file | cat -v
smith|Login|command line is my friend|2
oliver|Login|I have no idea why I am here|10
dennis|Payroll|are we there yet?|100
smith|Time|going to have some fun|200
smith|Logout|here I come|10
  • thanks for the explanation - I am not trying to get rid of all returns but the only one that broke the second line after the word "idea" in the 3rd field. As mentioned I am using windows pre-compiled opensource software that is only available. Added the realworld case for this question. As said I DONT WANT to use /n/r I only want to hexadecimal notations of non printable characters. – tengee Aug 7 '17 at 20:01
  • OK then don't use \r\n, use whatever characters work for you. So you have newlines in other fields too but you want to keep those as newlines? If so then include that in your example, if not then don't worry about it. Install a new version of said pre-compiled opensource software or better yet get cygwin and run the very latest gawk from that. – Ed Morton Aug 7 '17 at 20:22
  • No as said twice I only have broken lines in THAT field. I DONT want to remove any other returns after the numeric last field. Even before my first edit or additions I have written that in the question. – tengee Aug 7 '17 at 20:54
  • THINK about it what you're telling us - If you only have newlines in that field then why are you worrying about newlines in other fields? No-ones suggesting you remove the return at the end of the line - it's already consumed by the read and not in the buffer that you're operating on within awk. You seem to be missing my point and getting angry at me for trying to help you though so I'll stop now. Good luck. – Ed Morton Aug 7 '17 at 20:59

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