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I have been testing the stderr with the subprocess module. If I write a simple test with shell=True with the linux shell command ls intentionally bad typed:

p=subprocess.Popen(["lr"],stdout=subprocess.PIPE,stderr=subprocess.PIPE,shell=True)
out, err=p.communicate()
print ("standard error")
print(err)

it outputs the usual from the shell: lr: command not found.

But if shell=False, I don't quite understand why the program has an error executing

Traceback (most recent call last):
   File "importInteresantes.py", line 6, in <module>
      p=subprocess.Popen(["lr"],stdout=subprocess.PIPE,stderr=subprocess.PIPE,shell=False)
   File "/usr/lib/python2.7/subprocess.py", line 390, in __init__
errread, errwrite)
   File "/usr/lib/python2.7/subprocess.py", line 1024, in _execute_child
raise child_exception
OSError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory

I thought that it would give me the same output. Is the code wrong or is the point of view that I should obtain the same stderr?

NOTE: Just in case I also tried with python3

  • The mechanisms used to launch the command are very different in the two cases. Why is it exactly that you expect the error diagnostic to be identical? – NPE Aug 7 '17 at 18:47
  • "lr: command not found" was a shell error message. If you don't use a shell, then you don't have a shell to display shell error messages for you. – jasonharper Aug 7 '17 at 19:11
  • But what I expect is that the program at least runs and then some error pops up. Not that it can't run at all. So you can't know for the cases I type wrong command with python? I also heard that using shell=True can be risky – hodei_cloud Aug 7 '17 at 19:41
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With shell=True, Python launches a shell and tells the shell to run lr. The shell runs just fine, fails to find an lr program, and produces error output reporting this failure.

With shell=False, Python tries to run lr directly. Since there is no lr program to run, Python can't find an executable file corresponding to lr. Python can't launch the subprocess at all, and there are no stdout or stderr streams to read from. Python raises an exception reporting its failure to find the file.

This behavior is normal and expected.

  • Ok, in the end, I guess that the error inside the program always makes it unexecutable. Thanks for the answers – hodei_cloud Aug 7 '17 at 20:06

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