4

For example:

Big create()
{
    Big x;
    return std::move(x);
//  return static_cast<typename std::remove_reference<T>::type&&>(t) // why not elide here?
}

Assuming that applying std::move() to return a local variable inhibits move-semantics because compilers can't make any assumptions about the inner-workings of functions in general, what about cases when those assumptions are not necessary, for example when:

  1. std::move(x) is inlined (probably always)
  2. std::move(x) is written as: static_cast<typename std::remove_reference<T>::type&&>(t)

According to the current Standard, an implementation is allowed to apply NRVO...

— in a return statement in a function with a class return type, when the expression is the name of a non-volatile automatic object (other than a function parameter or a variable introduced by the exception-declaration of a handler (18.3)) with the same type (ignoring cv-qualification) as the function return type, the copy/move operation can be omitted by constructing the automatic object directly into the function call’s return object

Obviously, neither 1) nor 2) qualify. Apart from the fact that using std::move() to return a local variable is redundant, why is this restriction necessary?

  • 3
    Casts like std::move() are performed at compile time, so elision is moot; they are simply instructions to the compiler to change how sees a type. – user2100815 Aug 7 '17 at 18:50
  • 3
  • 1
    "Assuming std::move() on a local variable inhibits move semantics because etc. etc." - Doesn't sound right. – einpoklum - reinstate Monica Aug 7 '17 at 18:57
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    It seems that you misunderstand the question. The question is: why does the standard allow NRVO only in the case of "when the expression is the name of a non-volatile automatic object". – geza Aug 7 '17 at 19:12
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    @SergeyA: I think the OP asks the rationale behind this restriction, why it is there. And to be honest, I don't understand it either. If the compiler is able to prove that an expression refers to a local variable, it could apply elision. I don't understand why it is allowed only when it is strictly a name. I've asked a related question: stackoverflow.com/questions/45561234/… – geza Aug 8 '17 at 6:59
2

You should be clear on exactly what "allow elision" means. First of all, the compiler can do anything it wants, under the "as-if" rule. That is, the compiler can spit out any assembly it wants, as long as that assembly behaves correctly. That means that the compiler can elide any constructor it wants, but it does have to prove that the program will behave the same whether or not the constructor is called.

So why the special rules for elision? Well, these are cases where the compiler can elide constructor calls (and therefore, destructor calls too) without proving that the behavior is the same. This is very useful, because there are lots of types where the constructor is very non-trivial (like say, string), and the compilers in practice are generally not capable of proving that they are safe to elide (in a reasonable time frame) (in the past, there was even lack of clarity on whether optimizing out a heap allocation was legal to begin with, since it is basically mutation of a global variable).

So, we want to have elision for performance reasons. However, it is basically designating a special case in the standard, in terms of behavior. The bigger the special case, the more complexity we are introducing to the standard. So the goal should be to make the permitted situation for elision to be broad enough to cover the useful cases we care about, but no broader.

You are approaching this as: why not make the special case as big as practical? In reality, it is the opposite. To extend the allowable situations for elision, it needs to be shown to be very worthwhile.

2

After re-reading the question, I understand it differently. I read the question as 'Why std::move() inhibits (N)RVO'

Quote from standard provided in the question has wrong highlight. It should be

in a return statement in a function with a class return type, when the expression is the name of a non-volatile automatic object (other than a function parameter or a variable introduced by the exception-declaration of a handler (18.3)) with the same type (ignoring cv-qualification) as the function return type

What inhibits NRVO here is not that std::move() is called, but the fact that return value of std::move is not X, but X&&. It doesn't match the function signature!

  • Although this is good advice, I don't think it actually answers the question. – Nir Friedman Aug 7 '17 at 19:47
  • @NirFriedman, well I believe it does, by mooting (is it a word?) the whole question. – SergeyA Aug 7 '17 at 20:25
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    I mean, because the answer to a question is not necessary to write the best C++, does not mean the question is invalid. "Don't do X" is not an answer to "Why doesn't X work this way", especially when it's extremely clear that the author is already aware. As it stands, most of the information in this answer is already in the question. – Nir Friedman Aug 7 '17 at 21:00
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    Actually, the expression does have the same type, but a different value category. The only true problem is that it's not a name. – aschepler Aug 7 '17 at 23:29
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    @NirFriedman, OP keeps silent, so I do not think it is worth going any further here. Off the record, I think that standard (for obvious reasons) didn't want to allow conversion constructors to be elided, and didn't worth it's while to craft an exception for decays. – SergeyA Aug 8 '17 at 14:39

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