1

I'm trying to make a program that counts the number of vowels in a sentence, but for some reason my for-loop keeps iterating by 2 (figured this out by printing out the value of i during each iteration). What's wrong with it?

 //input
    Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
    String sentence;
    //prompt
    System.out.print("Type a sentence. \nThe number of vowels will be counted.");
    sentence = input.nextLine();
    //vowel check
    int charcount = 0;
    String temp;
    for(int i = 0; i < sentence.length(); i++)
    {
      temp = sentence.substring(i, i++);
      if (temp.equalsIgnoreCase("a") == true) 
        charcount ++;
      else if (temp.equalsIgnoreCase("e") == true) 
        charcount ++;
      else if (temp.equalsIgnoreCase("i") == true) 
        charcount ++;
      else if (temp.equalsIgnoreCase("o") == true) 
        charcount ++;
      else if (temp.equalsIgnoreCase("u") == true) 
        charcount ++;

      }

     System.out.print("There are " + charcount + " vowels in your sentence.");
}
}
  • 1
    i, i++??? That's going to have an effect – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Aug 7 '17 at 23:40
  • 1
    I won't add an answer because there are two that are already correct. What you have to understand is that i++ is actually telling the program to read that variable, then increment it by one. So, change the line temp = sentence.substring(i, i++) to temp = sentence.substring(i, i+1). That should do it. – mtbjay Aug 7 '17 at 23:42
  • suppose you should change the line temp = sentence.substring(i, i+1); to this. – Rajith Pemabandu Aug 7 '17 at 23:43
  • You probably should just replace substring() with charAt(i) it returns the character (as a char) and is clearer as to the intent. – twain249 Aug 7 '17 at 23:44
  • for (char temp: sentence.toCharArray()) if ("AEIOUaeiou".indexOf(temp) != -1) charcount++; is another way of doing this. – Ken Y-N Aug 7 '17 at 23:46
5

Change this line to:

temp = sentence.substring(i, i+1);

If you do i++ it will increment the value of i.

i++ is equivalent to i = i + 1;

  • 1
    I do see what you are getting at, but i++ is not equivalent to i = i + 1. The following is valid sentence.substring(i, i = i+1) and is equivalent to ++i – flakes Aug 8 '17 at 0:11
5

There are two times when you're incrementing i , once in your for loop definition, and once in your sentence.substring

Any time you put i++ the variable i will be increased by 1, regardless of it being in the for loop's definition or in another part of the loop.

for(int i = 0; i < sentence.length(); i++)
{
      temp = sentence.substring(i, i+1);
      if (temp.equalsIgnoreCase("a") == true) 
        charcount ++;
      else if (temp.equalsIgnoreCase("e") == true) 
        charcount ++;
      else if (temp.equalsIgnoreCase("i") == true) 
        charcount ++;
      else if (temp.equalsIgnoreCase("o") == true) 
        charcount ++;
      else if (temp.equalsIgnoreCase("u") == true) 
        charcount ++;

}

Should work.

Also, and someone who is more familiar with java than I am can correct me on this if I'm mistaken, but temp.equalsIgnoreCase() returns a boolean, so you don't need to do == True, you can just write else if (temp.equalsIgnoreCase("u"))

Addition: As per Scary Wombat's comment, you could simplify this even more so, as so:

for(int i = 0; i < sentence.length(); i++)
{
      temp = sentence.substring(i, i+1);
      if (temp.equalsIgnoreCase("a") || temp.equalsIgnoreCase("e") ||
          temp.equalsIgnoreCase("i") || temp.equalsIgnoreCase("o") ||
          temp.equalsIgnoreCase("u")) 
             charcount ++;
}
  • yes == true is not necessary, but can be kept if it makes it easier to read for you. – Scary Wombat Aug 7 '17 at 23:59
  • 1
    Also suggest that you change the multiple else ifs to if (temp.equalsIgnoreCase("a") || temp.equalsIgnoreCase("e") || ... – Scary Wombat Aug 8 '17 at 0:01
  • @ScaryWombat Noted and added to the post :) Thanks – Davy M Aug 8 '17 at 0:14
1

You have two instances of i++. Each is equivalent to i=i+1. You probably want your second one to be (i+1) rather than i++.

1

I suggest you don't use the substring method as it creates a new string from the original string.

From the documentation:

String  substring(int beginIndex)
Returns a new string that is a substring of this string.

Instead, use the charAt method which returns the character value at the specified index.

You can also cleanup the implementation by using a string with the vowels and invoking the indexOf method on it to test if the character in question is a vowel or not. Below is an example:

String vowels = "aeiou";

sentence = sentence.toLowerCase();
for (int i = 0; i < sentence.length(); i++) {
    char letter = sentence.charAt(i);

    if (vowels.indexOf(letter) > -1) {
        charCount++;
    }
}
  • Could you explain how the indexOf() method works in this situation? – lefty Aug 9 '17 at 2:34
  • @LFTY The method returns the index within the string for the first occurrence of the specified substring. In the above example, if you're searching for the letter o, it will return an index value representing the position of the first occurrence for that particular letter. An index of -1 means there was no match. – mscheker Aug 9 '17 at 2:46

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