239

I have the following simple code written in Swift 3:

let str = "Hello, playground"
let index = str.index(of: ",")!
let newStr = str.substring(to: index)

From Xcode 9 beta 5, I get the following warning:

'substring(to:)' is deprecated: Please use String slicing subscript with a 'partial range from' operator.

How can this slicing subscript with partial range from be used in Swift 4?

17 Answers 17

304

You should leave one side empty, hence the name "partial range".

let newStr = str[..<index]

The same stands for partial range from operators, just leave the other side empty:

let newStr = str[index...]

Keep in mind that these range operators return a Substring. If you want to convert it to a string, use String's initialization function:

let newStr = String(str[..<index])

You can read more about the new substrings here.

  • 5
    str[..<index] returns a Substring. If you want newStr to be a Stringyou have to write: let newStr = "\(str[..<index])" – Lindemann Aug 21 '17 at 17:43
  • 11
    Using string interpolation with a lone Substring is probably slightly confusing, since what you are really trying to accomplish is String initialization: let newStr = String(str[..<index]). – Gary Aug 31 '17 at 19:06
  • 4
    Updating code where my 'index' value was simply an integer yields an error message, Cannot subscript a value of type 'String' with an index of type 'PartialRangeUpTo<Int>' . What types of values have to be used there? – ConfusionTowers Sep 22 '17 at 20:50
  • 18
    @ConfusionTowers, Swift string indices are not integers, and that hasn't changed with version 4. You'll probably need str[..<str.index(str.startIndex, offsetBy: 8)] or something like that. Keep in mind that str.index is a linear-time operation in function of offsetBy. – zneak Sep 22 '17 at 21:09
  • 5
    @zneak You probably want str.prefix(8) – Tim Vermeulen Sep 24 '17 at 17:31
200

Convert Substring (Swift 3) to String Slicing (Swift 4)

Examples In Swift 3, 4:

let newStr = str.substring(to: index) // Swift 3
let newStr = String(str[..<index]) // Swift 4

let newStr = str.substring(from: index) // Swift 3
let newStr = String(str[index...]) // Swift 4 

let range = firstIndex..<secondIndex // If you have a range
let newStr = = str.substring(with: range) // Swift 3
let newStr = String(str[range])  // Swift 4
  • 4
    Perfecto, and thanks for giving the 3 and 4 examples side by side, makes updating my project way easier! – Ethan Parker Nov 10 '17 at 22:38
  • thank you so much – Chung Nguyen May 23 '18 at 9:25
46

Swift 4

Usage

let text = "Hello world"
text[...3] // "Hell"
text[6..<text.count] // world
text[NSRange(location: 6, length: 3)] // wor

Code

import Foundation

extension String {
    subscript(value: NSRange) -> Substring {
        return self[value.lowerBound..<value.upperBound]
    }
}

extension String {
    subscript(value: CountableClosedRange<Int>) -> Substring {
        get {
            return self[index(at: value.lowerBound)...index(at: value.upperBound)]
        }
    }

    subscript(value: CountableRange<Int>) -> Substring {
        get {
            return self[index(at: value.lowerBound)..<index(at: value.upperBound)]
        }
    }

    subscript(value: PartialRangeUpTo<Int>) -> Substring {
        get {
            return self[..<index(at: value.upperBound)]
        }
    }

    subscript(value: PartialRangeThrough<Int>) -> Substring {
        get {
            return self[...index(at: value.upperBound)]
        }
    }

    subscript(value: PartialRangeFrom<Int>) -> Substring {
        get {
            return self[index(at: value.lowerBound)...]
        }
    }

    func index(at offset: Int) -> String.Index {
        return index(startIndex, offsetBy: offset)
    }
}
  • 5
    this functionality should be default swift behavior. – Laimis Jan 6 '18 at 15:58
  • Definitely PR this into Swift lib :D – OhadM Jan 30 at 12:57
21

The conversion of your code to Swift 4 can also be done this way:

let str = "Hello, playground"
let index = str.index(of: ",")!
let substr = str.prefix(upTo: index)

You can use the code below to have a new string:

let newString = String(str.prefix(upTo: index))
17

Shorter in Swift 4:

var string = "123456"
string = String(string.prefix(3)) //"123"
string = String(string.suffix(3)) //"456"
12

substring(from: index) Converted to [index...]

Check the sample

let text = "1234567890"
let index = text.index(text.startIndex, offsetBy: 3)

text.substring(from: index) // "4567890"   [Swift 3]
String(text[index...])      // "4567890"   [Swift 4]
  • 1
    characters are deprecated in Swift 4, I think you have to change the example to get the index for Swift 4 – AbuTaareq Mar 3 '18 at 18:41
7

Some useful extensions:

extension String {
    func substring(from: Int, to: Int) -> String {
        let start = index(startIndex, offsetBy: from)
        let end = index(start, offsetBy: to - from)
        return String(self[start ..< end])
    }

    func substring(range: NSRange) -> String {
        return substring(from: range.lowerBound, to: range.upperBound)
    }
}
  • Interesting, I was thinking the same. Is String(line["http://".endIndex...]) clearer than the deprecated substring? line.substring(from: "http://".endIndex) maybe until they get the stated goal of amazing string handling, they should not deprecate substring. – possen Oct 22 '17 at 5:55
6

Example of uppercasedFirstCharacter convenience property in Swift3 and Swift4.

Property uppercasedFirstCharacterNew demonstrates how to use String slicing subscript in Swift4.

extension String {

   public var uppercasedFirstCharacterOld: String {
      if characters.count > 0 {
         let splitIndex = index(after: startIndex)
         let firstCharacter = substring(to: splitIndex).uppercased()
         let sentence = substring(from: splitIndex)
         return firstCharacter + sentence
      } else {
         return self
      }
   }

   public var uppercasedFirstCharacterNew: String {
      if characters.count > 0 {
         let splitIndex = index(after: startIndex)
         let firstCharacter = self[..<splitIndex].uppercased()
         let sentence = self[splitIndex...]
         return firstCharacter + sentence
      } else {
         return self
      }
   }
}

let lorem = "lorem".uppercasedFirstCharacterOld
print(lorem) // Prints "Lorem"

let ipsum = "ipsum".uppercasedFirstCharacterNew
print(ipsum) // Prints "Ipsum"
  • 1
    If you mean substring(with: range) -> self[range] – Arsen Vartbaronov Sep 18 '17 at 13:34
5

You can create your custom subString method using extension to class String as below:

extension String {
    func subString(startIndex: Int, endIndex: Int) -> String {
        let end = (endIndex - self.count) + 1
        let indexStartOfText = self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: startIndex)
        let indexEndOfText = self.index(self.endIndex, offsetBy: end)
        let substring = self[indexStartOfText..<indexEndOfText]
        return String(substring)
    }
}
4

Creating SubString (prefix and suffix) from String using Swift 4:

let str : String = "ilike"
for i in 0...str.count {
    let index = str.index(str.startIndex, offsetBy: i) // String.Index
    let prefix = str[..<index] // String.SubSequence
    let suffix = str[index...] // String.SubSequence
    print("prefix \(prefix), suffix : \(suffix)")
}

Output

prefix , suffix : ilike
prefix i, suffix : like
prefix il, suffix : ike
prefix ili, suffix : ke
prefix ilik, suffix : e
prefix ilike, suffix : 

If you want to generate a substring between 2 indices , use :

let substring1 = string[startIndex...endIndex] // including endIndex
let subString2 = string[startIndex..<endIndex] // excluding endIndex
  • let prefix = str[...<index>] instead of str[..<index>] single dot is missing. – AbuTaareq Mar 3 '18 at 18:45
  • @AbuTaareq, which one you are talking about? let prefix = str[..<index], it is perfect. (prefix string). Try in play ground to get more context. – Ashis Laha Mar 4 '18 at 3:57
4

I have written a string extension for replacement of 'String: subString:'

extension String {

    func sliceByCharacter(from: Character, to: Character) -> String? {
        let fromIndex = self.index(self.index(of: from)!, offsetBy: 1)
        let toIndex = self.index(self.index(of: to)!, offsetBy: -1)
        return String(self[fromIndex...toIndex])
    }

    func sliceByString(from:String, to:String) -> String? {
        //From - startIndex
        var range = self.range(of: from)
        let subString = String(self[range!.upperBound...])

        //To - endIndex
        range = subString.range(of: to)
        return String(subString[..<range!.lowerBound])
    }

}

Usage : "Date(1511508780012+0530)".sliceByString(from: "(", to: "+")

Example Result : "1511508780012"

PS: Optionals are forced to unwrap. Please add Type safety check wherever necessary.

  • Caution : optionals are forced to unwrap. please add Type safety check if necessary. – byJeevan Mar 24 '18 at 13:26
3

with this method you can get specific range of string.you need to pass start index and after that total number of characters you want.

extension String{
    func substring(fromIndex : Int,count : Int) -> String{
        let startIndex = self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: fromIndex)
        let endIndex = self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: fromIndex + count)
        let range = startIndex..<endIndex
        return String(self[range])
    }
}
2

When programming I often have strings with just plain A-Za-z and 0-9. No need for difficult Index actions. This extension is based on the plain old left / mid / right functions.

extension String {

    // LEFT
    // Returns the specified number of chars from the left of the string
    // let str = "Hello"
    // print(str.left(3))         // Hel
    func left(_ to: Int) -> String {
        return "\(self[..<self.index(startIndex, offsetBy: to)])"
    }

    // RIGHT
    // Returns the specified number of chars from the right of the string
    // let str = "Hello"
    // print(str.left(3))         // llo
    func right(_ from: Int) -> String {
        return "\(self[self.index(startIndex, offsetBy: self.length-from)...])"
    }

    // MID
    // Returns the specified number of chars from the startpoint of the string
    // let str = "Hello"
    // print(str.left(2,amount: 2))         // ll
    func mid(_ from: Int, amount: Int) -> String {
        let x = "\(self[self.index(startIndex, offsetBy: from)...])"
        return x.left(amount)
    }
}
  • Great idea!! Sad though that there is a need to abstract Swift-features just because they're constantly changing how things work. Guess they want us all to focus on constructs instead of productivity. Anyway, I made some minor updates to your fine code: pastebin.com/ManWmNnW – Fredrik Johansson Nov 22 '17 at 11:17
2

This is my solution, no warning, no errors, but perfect

let redStr: String = String(trimmStr[String.Index.init(encodedOffset: 0)..<String.Index.init(encodedOffset: 2)])
let greenStr: String = String(trimmStr[String.Index.init(encodedOffset: 3)..<String.Index.init(encodedOffset: 4)])
let blueStr: String = String(trimmStr[String.Index.init(encodedOffset: 5)..<String.Index.init(encodedOffset: 6)])
2

Swift4:

extension String {
    func subString(from: Int, to: Int) -> String {
       let startIndex = self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: from)
       let endIndex = self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: to)
       return String(self[startIndex...endIndex])
    }
}

Usage:

var str = "Hello, playground"
print(str.subString(from:1,to:8))
0

Hope this will help little more :-

var string = "123456789"

If you want a substring after some particular index.

var indexStart  =  string.index(after: string.startIndex )// you can use any index in place of startIndex
var strIndexStart   = String (string[indexStart...])//23456789

If you want a substring after removing some string at the end.

var indexEnd  =  string.index(before: string.endIndex)
var strIndexEnd   = String (string[..<indexEnd])//12345678

you can also create indexes with the following code :-

var  indexWithOffset =  string.index(string.startIndex, offsetBy: 4)
0

Hope it would be helpful.

extension String {
    func getSubString(_ char: Character) -> String {
        var subString = ""
        for eachChar in self {
            if eachChar == char {
                return subString
            } else {
                subString += String(eachChar)
            }
        }
        return subString
    }
}


let str: String = "Hello, playground"
print(str.getSubString(","))

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