8

The whole point of adding static types to JavaScript is to provide some guarantees about type safety. I noticed that array indexing seems to break type safety without using any dirty tricks like as any or the not null assertion operator.

let a: Array<number> = [1,2,3,4];
let b: number = a[4]; //undefined

This code does not cause any TypeScript errors, even though it is plain to see that it will violate type safety. It seems to me that the type of an Array<T> acted upon by the index operator [] should be type T | undefined, however the TypeScript compiler treats it as if it was type T.

Upon further investigation, I discovered that this behavior applies to use of the index operator on objects as well. It would seem that the index operator is not type safe in any case.

class Example {
  property: string;
}

let c: Example = { property: "example string" }
let d: string = c["Not a property name"]; //undefined

Use of the index operator on an object with arbitrary key returns type any, which can be assigned to any type without causing type errors. However, this can be resolved by using the --noImplicitAny compiler option.

My question is why does something as basic as indexing on an array break type safety? Is this a design constraint, an oversight, or a deliberate part of TypeScript?

3
  • 2
    That's an open issue. Please follow the discussion on github and let them know if you have any further ideas on this.
    – dotcs
    Aug 8 '17 at 18:35
  • It is an intentional work around because Javascript objects are not actually typed classes in the way Typescript likes to treat them. I have had to use this method several time when I receive back an object that I know may have had additional properties added by another function. Aug 8 '17 at 20:37
  • I wrote a workaround: github.com/danielnixon/total-functions Sep 30 '19 at 1:51
3

Use of the index operator on an object with arbitrary key returns type any, which can be assigned to any type without causing type errors. However, this can be resolved by using the --noImplicitAny compiler option.

Yes. Use the noImplicitAny, if you care for strict safety. Also strict:true (which strictNullChecks as well as others).

My question is why does something as basic as indexing on an array break type safety? Is this a design constraint, an oversight, or a deliberate part of TypeScript?

There are levels of safety. strict is the strongest. You choose how strict you want to be with your code.

More

From https://basarat.gitbooks.io/typescript/content/docs/options/intro.html

That said, traditionally programming languages have a hard boundary between what is and isn't allowed by the type system. TypeScript is different in that it gives you control on where you put the slider.

1
  • 2
    Thanks for your response. My question was specifically about indexing on type Array<T>, which returns type T. Aug 9 '17 at 14:36
3

To answer the why part of your question, it is because the developers of TypeScript thought that it would be too uncomfortable if you always had to check for undefined results when indexing an Array.

For example, the following code would not type-check:

var arr: number[]
var s = 0
for (var i in arr) {
  s += arr[i]
}

Furthermore, because JavaScript Arrays can be sparse, even if the index is known to not be out of bounds (as in, >= 0 and < arr.length), you can still get undefined, so there seems to be no way to fully infer actual unsafe indexing.

For more on this, see the issues TypeScript#13778 and TypeScript#11122.

1
  • That is a reasonable motive, so that developers can continue to use idiomatic JavaScript array indexing. Typescript has the idea of a "sliding scale" of type checking, so it would be nice to see a more strict array index as an option that could be turned on. However, as issue #11122 points out, few languages offer full type safety with array indexing. Mar 3 '20 at 17:19

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