3

I'm struggling to format a file according to the desired output, using bash tools. Here's a sample:

address="192.168.1.1"
portid="443"
portid="2000"
address="192.168.1.2"
portid="443"
portid="2000"

In essence, what I am trying to achieve is to search for a pattern (in this case, the whole IP address line), and prepend it to each subsequent line until the next match (before the next IP address). The desired output is this:

address="192.168.1.1"portid="443"
address="192.168.1.1"portid="2000"
address="192.168.1.2"portid="443"
address="192.168.1.2"portid="2000"

How can I achieve this using grep, awk or sed?

10

Considering your actual file is same as shown sample Input_file:

awk '/address/{val=$0;next} {print val $0}'  Input_file
  • 1
    This is perfect. Clean and simple. :) – J. Free Aug 9 '17 at 15:37
  • Thank you :) Glad that it helped you. – RavinderSingh13 Aug 9 '17 at 18:07
2

Input

[akshay@localhost tmp]$ cat file
address="192.168.1.1"
portid="443"
portid="2000"
address="192.168.1.2"
portid="443"
portid="2000"

Output

[akshay@localhost tmp]$ awk '/portid/{print a $0; next}/address/{a=$0}' file
address="192.168.1.1"portid="443"
address="192.168.1.1"portid="2000"
address="192.168.1.2"portid="443"
address="192.168.1.2"portid="2000"
  • Thanks Akshay, this certainly looks spot on! Saved my day! :) – J. Free Aug 9 '17 at 9:37
  • 1
    You should accept an answer at some point... it is the polite thing to do. And I also think it should be an awk solution. Makes sense here. – stevesliva Aug 9 '17 at 14:09
  • Sorry Steve I am new here and didn't know I have to do so. Have just done that, thanks for this. :) – J. Free Aug 9 '17 at 15:37
2

1. sed

sed -n 's/address/&/;Ta;h;d;:a;G;s/\(.*\)\n\(.*\)/\2\1/;p' file

Admittedly, it's more obscure than awk or perl, which would make more sense here, and whose code is pretty much self-explanatory.

s/address/&/;           test (substitute with self) for address
Ta;                     if false, got to label a
h;                      (if true) put the line in the hold buffer
d;                      delete the line from the pattern space
:a;                     set the label a
G;                      append the hold buffer to the pattern space (current line)
s/\(.*\)\n\(.*\)/\2\1/  swap around the newline, so the hold buffer contents
                        are actually prepended to the current line
p                       print the pattern space

Update: potong's suggestion is both shorter and easier to follow:

sed '/^address/h;//d;G;s/\(.*\)\n\(.*\)/\2\1/' file

2. awk

awk '/address/{a=$0} /portid/{print a$0}' file

3. perl

perl -lane '$a=$_ if /address/;print $a.$_ if /portid/' file
  • 2
    Perhaps sed '/^address/h;//d;G;s/\(.*\)\n\(.*\)/\2\1/' file might be a little less busy. – potong Aug 9 '17 at 17:45
1

Sed answer. Have to use the hold space carefully.

sed -n -e '/addr/h;/portid/{x;G;s/\nportid/portid/;p;s/portid.*//;h;}'

Explanation:

  • sed -n - only print when explicitly told to print
  • /addr/h - save the addr lines in the hold space
  • /portid/{...} - on each line matching portid, do this:
    • x get the addr line from the hold space, put the portid line in the hold space instead
    • G append the portid line to the addr line
    • s/\nportid/portid/ - remove the line break at the start of portid line
    • p print the combined lines
    • s/portid.*// strip the portid stuff back off the combined line
    • h save the addr line in the hold space again
  • Of course if the input is really this simple, you can condense the places where I used addr or portid to just a and p but sed is arcane enough.

Output:

$ sed -n -e '/addr/h;/portid/{x;G;s/\nportid/portid/;p;s/portid.*//;h}' addr.txt 
address="192.168.1.1"portid="443"
address="192.168.1.1"portid="2000"
address="192.168.1.2"portid="443"
address="192.168.1.2"portid="2000"

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