16

I have a rmd document where I have the following

```{r code_block, echo=FALSE}
A = matrix(c(1,3,0,1),2,2)
B = matrix(c(5,3,1,4),2,2)
```

$$
\begin{bmatrix} 
1  & 0 \\ 
3 & 1 \\ 
\end{bmatrix}
*
\begin{bmatrix} 
5 & 1 \\ 
3 & 4 \\ 
\end{bmatrix}
$$

Now I would like to instead of hard coding the LaTeX part manually, I could use the matrix from the variables A and B instead. How could this be done?

Thanks.

4 Answers 4

12

Straightforwardly, you can write latex line. writeLines() or cat() would be helpful.

You can use apply(A, 1) with two step paste().

  1. paste(collpase = "&"): collapse each row
  2. paste(, "\\\\"): collapse every column with \\

Then we can get the latex formula of matrix.

write_matex <- function(x) {
  begin <- "$$\\begin{bmatrix}"
  end <- "\\end{bmatrix}$$"
  X <-
    apply(x, 1, function(x) {
      paste(
        paste(x, collapse = "&"),
        "\\\\"
      )
    })
  writeLines(c(begin, X, end))
}

If you conduct this function, write_matex(A) gives

$$\begin{bmatrix}
1&0 \\
3&1 \\
\end{bmatrix}$$

When you use chunk option {r, results = 'asis'}, you might see the matrix in both pdf and html.

enter image description here


Latex block

Based on this function, you might freely use matrix in latex block. For this, $$ should be removed in the function. Instead of writeLines(), paste(collapse = "") can be used.

write_matex2 <- function(x) {
  begin <- "\\begin{bmatrix}"
  end <- "\\end{bmatrix}"
  X <-
    apply(x, 1, function(x) {
      paste(
        paste(x, collapse = "&"),
        "\\\\"
      )
    })
  paste(c(begin, X, end), collapse = "")
}

In the text part, you can implement this function as

$$
`r write_matex2(A)` \times `r write_matex2(B)`
$$

In r markdown, this r with back quotation can attach your r function and variable. So you can get

enter image description here

As you can see, this is reproducible.

(C <- matrix(1:10, nrow = 2))
#>      [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
#> [1,]    1    3    5    7    9
#> [2,]    2    4    6    8   10

Similarly,

$$`r write_matex2(C)` + `r write_matex2(C)`$$

enter image description here

10
+50

This is a perfect use case for knitr::knit_print().
You will find details about the knitr::knit_print() method in its dedicated vignette:

vignette('knit_print', package = 'knitr')

The goal is to provide a knit_print method for objects of class matrix. As other answers suggested, it could be useful to define operators.

You will find below an Rmd file that provides a solution to your problem. It also contains a proposal for operators.

The main feature of this answer is that you only have to write

`r A`

to output the matrix A in LaTeX inline mode (no $ to type) and write

```{r echo=FALSE}
A
```

to write in LaTeX display mode.

I also propose you to define a %times% operator. Therefore, you only have to write:

`r A %times% B`

This answer is quite generic and you should be able to extend it to other objects.

---
title: "R Markdown: Display a Matrix for R Variable"
author: "Romain Lesur"
output: 
  html_document:
    keep_md: true
---

```{r setup, include=FALSE}
# Define a generic method that transforms an object x in a LaTeX string
as_latex = function(x, ...) {
  UseMethod('as_latex', x)
}

# Define a class latex for LaTeX expressions
as_latex.character = function(x) {
  structure(
    paste(x, collapse = ' '), 
    class = c('latex', 'character')
  )
}

# A character string of class latex is rendered in display mode
# Define a knit_print() method for the latex class
knit_print.latex = function(x, ...) {
  knitr::asis_output(
    paste0('$$', x, '$$')
  )
} 

# Now, define a method as_latex for matrix
as_latex.matrix = function(x, ...) {
  as_latex(c(
    '\\begin{bmatrix}',
    paste(
      t(x),
      rep(c(rep('&', nrow(x) - 1), '\\\\'), ncol(x)),
      collapse = ''
    ),
    '\\end{bmatrix}'
  ))
}

# Indicate to knitr that matrix are rendered as latex
knit_print.matrix = function(x, ...) {
  knitr::knit_print(as_latex(x))
}

# Build a knitr inline hook to display inline latex in inline mode
default_inline_hook = knitr::knit_hooks$get('inline')
knitr::knit_hooks$set(inline = function(x) {
  x = paste(gsub('\\$\\$', '$', x))
  default_inline_hook(x)
})
```


```{r}
A = matrix(c(1,3,0,1),2,2)
B = matrix(c(5,3,1,4),2,2)
```


Now, matrix are rendered as LaTeX:

Matrix A in inline mode: `r A`

Matrix A in display mode:

```{r echo=FALSE}
A
```


### Operators

As other answers suggested, it could be useful to define operators.  
With the previous class, it is relatively straightforward:

```{r operators, include=FALSE}
`%times%` = function(x, y) {
  as_latex(sapply(list(x, '\\times', y), as_latex))  
}

`%add%` = function(x, y) {
  as_latex(sapply(list(x, '+', y), as_latex))  
}
```

Example in inline mode: `r A %add% A %times% B`

Display mode:
```{r echo=FALSE}
A %times% B
```
6
  • I really like this answer, but in a PDF rendering it threw an error about the $ placement. I was able to get it to work with a compromise: the end user needs to put in the $. To me this is ok, because it gives them the choice of $inline$ vs. $$display$$ rendering (the latter being centered on its own line). To make it work I made the knit_print.latex() function body simply be knitr::asis_output(x) and to use it add the $ in the markdown like Matrix A: $`r A`$ for inline and $$`r A %add% A %times% B`$$ for display mode. Jan 12, 2019 at 4:01
  • 1
    By the way, the implementation of as_latex.matrix is brilliant. Three of us gave three variations on that construction here but I find this one to be the most elegant. Jan 12, 2019 at 4:44
  • @BrianStamper Glad you like this. For pdf_document support, I've slightly edited the knit_print.matrix method: now it works well for html and pdf document.
    – RLesur
    Jan 12, 2019 at 13:29
  • @BrianStamper Second update: I added a knitr hook to handle inline and display mode
    – RLesur
    Jan 12, 2019 at 18:47
  • 1
    Not only a solution but this is a model to learn from - I can see implementing other LaTeX object renderings in this manner now. Bounty awarded, many thanks. Jan 13, 2019 at 18:15
5

I figured out a function that plugs the numbers from the matrix into the correct LaTeX code. In the code block where you use it you need results='asis' to get the LaTeX to render, and you can wrap the function in writeLines along with the other parts you need.

I'm still open to more elegant solutions.

```{r}
A <- matrix(c(1, 3, 0, 1), 2, 2)
B <- matrix(c(5, 3, 1, 4), 2, 2)

# Utility function to print matrices in proper LaTeX format
print_mat <- function(mat) {
  n <- nrow(mat)
  c('\\begin{bmatrix}',
    paste0(sapply(seq_len(n - 1),
                  function(i) paste0(mat[i, ], collapse = ' & ')),
           ' \\\\'),
    paste0(mat[n, ], collapse = ' & '),
    '\\end{bmatrix}')
} 

```

```{r, results = 'asis'}
writeLines(c('$$',
             print_mat(A),
             '\\times',
             print_mat(B),
             '$$'))
```

Picture of resulting output

1

hello you can use library(printr) in a markdown block

knitr::kable(A ,  caption = "matrix A")

from https://yihui.name/printr/

like this

```{r code_block, echo=FALSE}
A = matrix(c(1,3,0,1),2,2)
B = matrix(c(5,3,1,4),2,2)
knitr::kable(A ,  caption = "matrix A")
```
3
  • It only seems to print correctly if it is outside of the latex block ($$ $$) Aug 10, 2017 at 2:16
  • It only works with: Some text r kable(A) * r kable(B) $$some latex code without matrix$$. If I do: $$some latex code r kable(A)$$, then the out put is "$$ Matrix A $$" there are extra $$ signs and the latex code before matrix A has disappeared. Aug 10, 2017 at 2:23
  • 1
    While this answer outputs a nicely formatted table, it doesn't actually print the matrix in proper mathematical notation with the square brackets on left and right. I'm hoping someone can come up with the correct solution. Jan 7, 2019 at 22:32

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