1

querySelector returns null when searched for the id "#b>a", but getElementById returns the correct element. What's going on?

var x = document.querySelector('#b>a');
console.log(x);
var y = document.getElementById("b>a");
console.log(y);
Name <input type="text" id="b>a">

1
  • Why do you need such name of an id because it is highly predicted to run in trouble?
    – Reporter
    Aug 9 '17 at 13:23
5

The > character has meaning in CSS selector syntax. You'd have to use "#b\>a".

The > is the "immediate child" combinator, so plain "#b>a" selects an <a> element that's a child of your element with id "b".

7
  • 1
    ... at which point you might as well just use document.getElementById(), unless your use case requires a selector.
    – BoltClock
    Aug 9 '17 at 13:23
  • It's called a combinator ;)
    – BoltClock
    Aug 9 '17 at 13:24
  • @BoltClock agreed, though using selectors isn't weird or bad or anything, especially in the context of some sort of tooling/framework situation. edit yes dang it I was trying to remember the term; in my defense I was typing while on the phone ;)
    – Pointy
    Aug 9 '17 at 13:24
  • Indeed, there are numerous situations that require a selector.
    – BoltClock
    Aug 9 '17 at 13:25
  • 1
    CSS.escape() could be useful, since there are other characters as well that need to be escaped within CSS selectors. Mind the browser compabitiliy.
    – vsa
    Aug 9 '17 at 14:14
2

You need to escape the > character. See snippet below

var x = document.querySelector('#b\\>a');
console.log(x);
var y = document.getElementById("b>a");
console.log(y);
Name <input type="text" id="b>a">

1

Query by selector will look for types before characters, so it will look for an rather than the text a.

To get this to work you would need to escape the selector using

var x = document.querySelector('#b\\>a');

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