3

Say that you want to do some fancy formatting of some tabular output from powershell, and the destination is to be html (either for a webserver, or to be sent in an email). Let's say for example that you want certain numeric values to have a different background color. Whatever. I can think of two solid programmatic ways to accomplish this: output XML and transform with XSLT, or output HTML and decorate with CSS.

XSLT is probably the harder of the two (I say that because I don't know it), but from what little I recall, it has the benefit of bring able to embed the selection criteria (xpath?) for aforementioned fancy formatting. CSS on the other hand needs a helping hand. If you wanted a certain cell to be treated specially, then you would need to distinguish it from its siblings with a class, id, or something along those lines. PowerShell doesn't really have a way to do that natively, so that would mean parsing the HTML as it leaves convertto-html and adding, for example, a "emphasis" class:

<td class="emphasis">32MB</td>

I don't like the idea of the required text parsing, especially given that I would rather be able to somehow emphasize what needs emphasizing in Powershell before it hits HTML.

Is XSLT the best way? Have suggestions for how to markup the HTML after it leaves convertto-html or ideas of a different way?

7
  • Your requests are irrelevant to the points of my questions which I think are clearly and intentionally very generally stated above. If you don't know the answer, that's cool, man, no worries. That said, 1: gps|export-clixml , 2: produce pretty HTML tables, 3: if ($_.ws -ge 500MB ) { make_it_red }. But those are merely hypothetical examples.
    – halr9000
    Dec 30, 2010 at 4:07
  • @halr9000: Your questions is prety much argumentative (asking for "the best way"...). Standard CSS can't check for text content until proposed expressions get implemented. So, this is a task for preprocessing (XSLT server or client side, any other server side language) or postprocessing (JavaScript). Wich is the best for your scenario? You need to specify a criterion. And then you need to test.
    – user357812
    Dec 30, 2010 at 14:07
  • @skaffman: Before tagging this question I did vote for closing it and then I also downvoted it. I believe that the users of SO can learn not only from good questions and answers but also from the bad ones. This can very well be supported by the power of SO tags. So, when we need to show a user what a good question is or what a bad question is, we can just say: Have a look at the examples in the good-questions and bad-questions tags. Dec 30, 2010 at 17:18
  • 1
    @Dimitre: I see what you're saying, but such meta-tags have been actively discouraged for months now. Tags should reflect the objective content of the question, not a subjective opinion of it.
    – skaffman
    Dec 30, 2010 at 17:21
  • 1
    I agree that there is some subjective leeway in this question, but when I don't know the best solution, why should I artificially limit the scope of people's answers? If my requirements were tighter, I would have said so. In this case, they are just as you see above, so I'm leaving it as is. Thanks for the feedback.
    – halr9000
    Jan 4, 2011 at 14:54

4 Answers 4

8

Hey, I have come up with another answer which I like better. This one doesn't rely on the browser supporting JavaScript ...

Add-Type -AssemblyName System.Xml.Linq

# Get the running processes to x(ht)ml
$xml = [System.Xml.Linq.XDocument]::Parse( "$(Get-Process | ConvertTo-Html)" )

# Find the index of the column you want to format:
$wsIndex = (($xml.Descendants("{http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml}th") | Where-Object { $_.Value -eq "WS" }).NodesBeforeSelf() | Measure-Object).Count

# Format the column based on whatever rules you have:
switch($xml.Descendants("{http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml}td") | Where { ($_.NodesBeforeSelf() | Measure).Count -eq $wsIndex } ) {
   {200MB -lt $_.Value } { $_.SetAttributeValue( "style", "background: red;"); continue } 
   {20MB  -lt $_.Value } { $_.SetAttributeValue( "style", "background: orange;"); continue } 
   {10MB  -lt $_.Value } { $_.SetAttributeValue( "style", "background: yellow;"); continue } 
}
# Save the html out to a file
$xml.Save("$pwd/procs2.html")

# Open the thing in your browser to see what we've wrought
ii .\procs2.html

Is there a special badge for stealing the "marked as answer" from yourself? ;-)

5
  • 2
    Add-Type -AssemblyName System.Xml.Linq is missing. Jan 6, 2011 at 2:31
  • 1
    Order of switch conditions should be reversed (or yellow color wins it all) Jan 6, 2011 at 2:47
  • Note: Requires .NET v3.5 or v4, download link: microsoft.com/downloads/en/…
    – halr9000
    Jan 6, 2011 at 13:02
  • I'd also start it with: [system.Environment]::CurrentDirectory = Split-Path $MyInvocation.MyCommand.Path
    – halr9000
    Jan 6, 2011 at 13:26
  • @halr9000 better to just put $pwd in the save line, I think (fixed)
    – Jaykul
    Jan 6, 2011 at 16:12
7

How about using JQuery, and inserting a header with the JQUery script and some styling, like:

Get-Process | ConvertTo-Html -Head @'

<script type="text/javascript" src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.4.4/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function() {

   $("table tr td:nth-child(" + ( $("table th:contains('WS')").index() + 1 ) + ")").each(function() {
      if($(this).html() > 209715200) { // 200MB
         $(this).css("background", "red" );
      } else if($(this).html() > 20971520) { // 20MB
         $(this).css("background", "orange" );
      } else if($(this).html() > 10485760) { // 10MB
         $(this).css("background", "yellow" );
      }
   });

})
</script>

'@ | Out-File procs.html; ii .\procs.html
3
  • 2
    +1 for helping JQuery to evolve from Silver Bullet to Silver Nuke. May however not be the best solution when used for HTML E-Mail as indicated in the post.
    – Filburt
    Jan 4, 2011 at 9:05
  • Yeah, it would definitely be better to do (roughly) the same thing via xslt before outputting to disc... hmm
    – Jaykul
    Jan 4, 2011 at 14:13
  • I removed mention of HTML email--that really does turn into another question.
    – halr9000
    Jan 4, 2011 at 14:57
6

A much faster way:

Ok, I keep promising myself that I won't spend time on solved problems anymore, but ... that switch statement in my second answer was taking over 10 seconds to run on my system, -- because it's doing the "where" stuff in PowerShell instead of in LINQ.

Since PowerShell doesn't support LINQ, I solved it by writing a static helper method in an Add-Type call (and sped up that switch statement by about 1000x):

Add-Type -Language CSharpVersion3 -ReferencedAssemblies System.Xml, System.Xml.Linq -UsingNamespace System.Linq -Name XUtilities -Namespace Huddled -MemberDefinition @"    
    public static System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<System.Xml.Linq.XElement> GetElementByIndex( System.Xml.Linq.XContainer doc, System.Xml.Linq.XName element, int index) {
        return from e in doc.Descendants(element) where e.NodesBeforeSelf().Count() == index select e;
    }
    public static System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<System.Xml.Linq.XElement> GetElementByValue( System.Xml.Linq.XContainer doc, System.Xml.Linq.XName element, string value) {
        return from e in doc.Descendants(element) where e.Value == value select e;
    }
"@

# Get the running processes to x(ht)ml
$xml = [System.Xml.Linq.XDocument]::Parse( "$(Get-Process | ConvertTo-Html)" )

# Find the index of the column you want to format:
$wsIndex = [Huddled.XUtilities]::GetElementByValue( $xml, "{http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml}th", "WS" ) | %{ ($_.NodesBeforeSelf() | Measure).Count }


switch([Huddled.XUtilities]::GetElementByIndex( $xml, "{http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml}td", $wsIndex )) {
   {200MB -lt $_.Value } { $_.SetAttributeValue( "style", "background: red;"); continue } 
   {20MB  -lt $_.Value } { $_.SetAttributeValue( "style", "background: orange;"); continue } 
   {10MB  -lt $_.Value } { $_.SetAttributeValue( "style", "background: yellow;"); continue } 
}

# Save the html out to a file
$xml.Save("$pwd/procs2.html")

# Open the thing in your browser to see what we've wrought
ii .\procs2.html

PowerShell 3:

I redid this in PowerShell 3 after someone linked to this post, and you no longer need the compiled types to get it fast:

Add-Type -AssemblyName System.Xml.Linq

$Process = $(Get-Process | Select Handles, NPM, PM, WS, VM, CPU, Id, ProcessName)

$xml = [System.Xml.Linq.XDocument]::Parse( "$($Process | ConvertTo-Html)" )
if($Namespace = $xml.Root.Attribute("xmlns").Value) {
    $Namespace = "{{{0}}}" -f $Namespace
}

# Find the index of the column you want to format:
$wsIndex = [Array]::IndexOf( $xml.Descendants("${Namespace}th").Value, "WS")

foreach($row in $xml.Descendants("${Namespace}tr")){
    switch(@($row.Descendants("${Namespace}td"))[$wsIndex]) {
       {200MB -lt $_.Value } { $_.SetAttributeValue( "style", "background: red;"); continue } 
       {20MB  -lt $_.Value } { $_.SetAttributeValue( "style", "background: orange;"); continue } 
       {10MB  -lt $_.Value } { $_.SetAttributeValue( "style", "background: yellow;"); continue } 
    }
}
# Save the html out to a file
$xml.Save("$pwd/procs1.html")

# Open the thing in your browser to see what we've wrought
ii .\procs2.html
1
  • 1
    Yeah, feel free to tag me OCD
    – Jaykul
    Jan 6, 2011 at 16:53
2

As a result of some github discussions, I've updated this for PowerShell 4/5/6 using the .where() method thus eliminating the dependency on the pipeline. The slow part is generating the HTML whereas the actual XML manipulation only takes ~200 ms.

Add-Type -AssemblyName System.Xml.Linq

# Get the running processes to x(ht)ml. This is *SLOW*.
$xml = [System.Xml.Linq.XDocument]::Parse([string] (Get-Process | ConvertTo-Html))

# Find the index of the column you want to format:
$wsIndex = $xml.Descendants("{http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml}th").
    Where{$_.Value -eq "WS" }.
        NodesBeforeSelf().
            Count

# Format the column based on whatever rules you have:
switch($xml.Descendants("{http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml}td").Where{@($_.NodesBeforeSelf()).Count -eq $wsIndex} ) {
   {200MB -lt $_.Value } { $_.SetAttributeValue( "style", "background: red;"); continue } 
   {20MB  -lt $_.Value } { $_.SetAttributeValue( "style", "background: orange;"); continue } 
   {10MB  -lt $_.Value } { $_.SetAttributeValue( "style", "background: yellow;"); continue }
}

# Save the html out to a file
$xml.Save("$pwd/procs2.html")

# Open the thing in your browser to see what we've wrought
ii .\procs2.html

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