1

I wish to run the following sql statement within sqldf():

select columnA, "new_column_value" as columnB, "column.C" from mytable
where columnA in ('123','456')

but when I run within sqldf :

sqldf('select columnA, "new_column_value" as columnB, "column.C" from mytable
    where columnA in ('123','456')')

I get the obvious error that the single quotes have escaped the sql code at in('123','456'), and if I wrap the sql code with double quotes, the sql is escaped where I create a new column "new_column_value" or when I select via literal string from the unhelpfully named "column.C".

So I am in a bit of a catch 22. It's almost as if I want to wrap by sql code in something other than quotes within the sqldf() call.

Can I escape both single and double quotes where I please?

  • Can you try to use ` ? – Orhan Yazar Aug 9 '17 at 14:28
  • 1
    Posting the entire statement in double quotes and using single quotes inside without escaping should work. sqldf("SELECT columnA, 'new_column_value' as columnB, 'column.C' FROM mytable WHERE columnA in ('123','456')") – Sagar Aug 9 '17 at 14:39
  • Thanks Sagar was literally about to update I tried this with success – brucezepplin Aug 9 '17 at 14:40
  • Glad you tried and that worked. – Sagar Aug 9 '17 at 14:41
  • I would suggest you just learn how to use R syntax. Data manipulation in R is both straight forward and very efficient. – David Arenburg Aug 9 '17 at 14:44
1

In R strings double quotes are escaped by a backslash:

test <- "String escaping is \"easy\"!"

This should work for you too. (Wrap the whole command in double quotes and escape the inner ones by a backslash)

This can also be seen if you look at intToUtf8(34) where 34 is the ASCII code for a double quote.

| improve this answer | |
  • hi @AEF - I have tried this, and it seems using \"CODEHERE\" within sqldf completely ignores the doublequotes, rather than allowing it's behaviour - which in this case is to tell sql that I am selecting from a column using a literal string. – brucezepplin Aug 9 '17 at 14:27
  • That is very strange, because the escaping should happen before the strings are send to the SQL engine. Also, I just found [this][stackoverflow.com/questions/18686083/… question where the exact same thing works. – AEF Aug 9 '17 at 14:31
0

Assuming the default sqlite backend, either of these work:

> sqldf("select \"Time\" from BOD")
  Time
1    1
2    2
3    3
4    4
5    5
6    7

> sqldf("select [Time] from BOD")
  Time
1    1
2    2
3    3
4    4
5    5
6    7

The Update in the question claims that this works but it gives the constant string Time and not the variable of that name.

> sqldf("select 'Time' from BOD")
  'Time'
1   Time
2   Time
3   Time
4   Time
5   Time
6   Time
| improve this answer | |
  • this is true, so now I have to figure out why my code works when it shouldn't :/ I'll figure out and update – brucezepplin Aug 9 '17 at 14:51
  • I happen to be using count('Time'). but when using select 'Time' as you point out I output the word Time for however many rows in the table. you are right - I'll remove my update – brucezepplin Aug 9 '17 at 14:55

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.