15

I'm using Excel 2010. I have an Excel macro-enabled template that has a data connection to a text file that is set to automatically refresh when a new document is created using this template.

The following macro is within the "ThisWorkbook" object to remove the data connection before saving the new document:

Private Sub Workbook_BeforeSave(ByVal SaveAsUI As Boolean, Cancel As Boolean)

    Do While ActiveWorkbook.Connections.Count > 0
        ActiveWorkbook.Connections.Item(ActiveWorkbook.Connections.Count).Delete
    Loop

End Sub

When a user clicks the save icon / hits ctrl+S, inputs a filename and then clicks save to save as a macro-free Excel workbook (as is the default and required filetype) they are prompted with a message stating:

The following features cannot be saved in macro-free workbooks:

• VB project

To save a file with these features, click No, and then choose a macro-enabled file type in the File Type list.

To continue saving as a macro-free workbook, click Yes.

Is it possible to prevent this message from appearing and have Excel assume that the user wants to continue with a macro-free workbook?

I've searched all over and understand that I may be able to add code to the workbook object that removes itself so that Excel has no VB project to cause this message but this would require each user to change Trust Center Settings (Trust access to the VBA project object model) which I want to avoid.

I've also seen suggestions of using:

Application.DisplayAlerts = False

but can't get this to work. Every example of it's use seems to be within a sub that is also handling the saving of the document whereas in my situation the BeforeSave sub ends before the document is saved in the default, non-vba way which is perhaps why it does not work?

Does this property reset to a default True after the sub has ended / before the save actually occurs?

Apologies for any nonsense I may have dispensed, my experience with VBA is very limited.

4
  • I'm not sure I understand why the user is able to edit the template itself? A macro-enabled template, when clicked by an "end user" should open itself as a separate, plain workbook with no macros in it. The only time the macros in the template are available are when it is being created. If it is to be changed often I don't think it makes sense that it is a template Jun 12, 2018 at 18:09
  • @Marcucciboy2 I don't know if this depends on some settings, but on my PC, when I double-click on a macro-enabled template workbook, the new file that is created still contains the vba code from the template. Jun 13, 2018 at 22:21
  • @DecimalTurn i wonder if i had it in a module instead of ThisWorkbook when I tried it Jun 14, 2018 at 4:43
  • You may just create new workbook, copy worksheets, save it and close. Jun 15, 2018 at 23:25

4 Answers 4

3
+25

I cannot test on Excel 2010, but at least for 2016, it's working fine:

Sub SaveAsRegularWorkbook()

    Dim wb As Workbook
    Dim Path As String

    Set wb = ThisWorkbook
    Path = "T:\he\Path\you\prefer\"
    Application.DisplayAlerts = False
    Application.EnableEvents = False
    wb.SaveAs Filename:=Path & "Test.xlsx", FileFormat:=51
    Application.DisplayAlerts = True
    Application.EnableEvents = True

End Sub

Give it a try.

4
  • If we only take into account the title and the first 5 words of the question, this answer is perfect. However, it does not take into account the context provided in the question. Jun 16, 2018 at 0:20
  • DecimalTurn, could you please explain what exactly you think is not being taken into account? I'm missing it... Thx!
    – EarlyBird2
    Jun 18, 2018 at 3:57
  • The question is about making things easier for end users to save the new file. So, I think an answer should make use of an event macro (eg. Workbook_BeforeSave) as mentioned in the question. This way, users don't have to run the macros by themselves which would go against the initial objective. Jun 18, 2018 at 5:14
  • You may argue on that as the question was how to prevent the error message from showing, but I think I got your point now, taking this one step further.
    – EarlyBird2
    Jun 18, 2018 at 5:25
2

Different approach... when the template is loaded, require the user to save as (I have a workbook/template with a similar situation...). This should open them up to the user's Documents folder, though you can adjust to save to whatever location.

Inside of the ThisWorkbook module, put:

Option Explicit

Private Sub Workbook_Open()
    Dim loc As Variant
    Application.DisplayAlerts = False
    loc = Application.GetSaveAsFilename(FileFilter:="Excel Files (*.xlsx), *.xlsx", Title:="Save As...", InitialFileName:="%USERPROFILE%\Documents\NAME_OF_FILE")
    If loc <> False Then
        ActiveWorkbook.SaveAs Filename:=loc, FileFormat:=51
        Exit Sub
    End If
    Application.DisplayAlerts = True
End Sub

Edit1: Adding the if statement using a base-template name, so subsequent saves do not prompt the save-as:

Option Explicit

Private Sub Workbook_Open()
    If ActiveWorkbook.Name = "_NAME_OF_FILE.xlsb" Then
        Dim loc As Variant
        Application.DisplayAlerts = False 
        loc = Application.GetSaveAsFilename(FileFilter:="Excel Files (*.xlsx), *.xlsx", Title:="Save As...", InitialFileName:="%USERPROFILE%\Documents\_NAME_OF_FILE")
        If loc <> False Then
            ActiveWorkbook.SaveAs Filename:=loc, FileFormat:=51
            Exit Sub
        End If
        Application.DisplayAlerts = True
    End If
End Sub
3
  • Maybe you should add an If statement to prevent the code from running when the original template needs to be opened for editing. Jun 13, 2018 at 22:29
  • @DecimalTurn It's a thought, though I tend to specifically make any opening of the template a save-as. I do have a caveat in my similar file where the template is saved with a different name, and as such would have: If ActiveWorkbook.Name = "_TEMPLATENAME.xlsb" Then which for each subsequent open after the rename does not trigger the save. I took that out as it didn't fit the main bill of the question, but I understand where you're coming from.
    – Cyril
    Jun 14, 2018 at 13:30
  • I see what you mean. I assumed from the question that Excel macro-enabled template meant a *.xltm file that end-users would double-click on to create a new Excel file based that template. But your suggestion of using a simple macro-enabled workbook and forcing the end-user to save the file with a new name on opening certainly works. Jun 14, 2018 at 17:41
1

For this answer, I'm assuming that by Excel macro-enabled template, you mean a xltm file. I also guess that what you mean by "new document" is the document that is generated when a user double-clicks on the xtlm file (hence this new file has no location on since it hasn't been saved yet).

To solve your issue, you could use a custom SaveAs window (Application.GetSaveAsFilename) to have more control on how the user saves the file when the Workbook_BeforeSave event macro gets called.

Here is how to implement it:

1 - Copy this code into a new module.

Option Explicit  

Sub SaveAsCustomWindow()  

    Const C_PROC_NAME As String = "SaveAsCustomWindow"
    Dim strFullFileName As String, strPreferedFolder As String, strDefaultName As String
    Dim UserInput1 As Variant, UserInput2 As Variant
    Dim isValidName As Boolean, isFileClosed As Boolean, isWorkbookClosed As Boolean
    Dim strFilename As String, strFilePath As String


    'To avoid Warning when overwriting
    Application.DisplayAlerts = False
    'Disable events (mostly for the BeforeSave event) to avoid creating infinite loop
    Application.EnableEvents = False
    On Error GoTo ErrHandler

    'Customizable section
    strDefaultName = ThisWorkbook.Name
    strPreferedFolder = Environ("USERPROFILE")

    Do While isWorkbookClosed = False
        Do While isFileClosed = False
            Do While isValidName = False
                UserInput1 = Application.GetSaveAsFilename(InitialFileName:=strPreferedFolder & "\" & strDefaultName, FileFilter:="Excel Workbook (*.xlsx),*.xlsx")

                If UserInput1 = False Then
                    GoTo ClosingStatements 'This is important to take care of the case when the user presses cancel
                Else
                    strFullFileName = UserInput1
                End If

                strFilename = Right(strFullFileName, Len(strFullFileName) - InStrRev(strFullFileName, "\"))
                strDefaultName = strFilename

                strFilePath = Left(strFullFileName, InStrRev(strFullFileName, "\") - 1)
                strPreferedFolder = strFilePath

                'If the file exist, ask for overwrite permission
                If Dir(strFullFileName) <> "" Then
                    UserInput2 = MsgBox(strFilename & " already exists." & vbNewLine & "Do you want to overwrite?", vbYesNoCancel Or vbExclamation)
                    If UserInput2 = vbNo Then
                        isValidName = False
                    ElseIf UserInput2 = vbYes Then
                        isValidName = True
                    ElseIf UserInput2 = vbCancel Then
                        GoTo ClosingStatements
                    Else
                        GoTo ClosingStatements
                    End If
                Else
                    isValidName = True
                End If
            Loop

            'Check if file is actually open
            If isFileOpen(strFullFileName) Then
                MsgBox "The workbook you want to overwrite is currently open. Choose a different name, or close the  workbook before saving.", vbExclamation
                isValidName = False
                isFileClosed = False
            Else
                isFileClosed = True
            End If
        Loop

        'Check if an opened workbook has the same name
        If isWorkbookOpen(strFilename) Then
            MsgBox "You cannot save this workbook with the same name as another open workbook or add-in. Choose a different name, or close the other workbook or add-in before saving.", vbExclamation
            isValidName = False
            isFileClosed = False
            isWorkbookClosed = False
        Else
            isWorkbookClosed = True
        End If
    Loop

    ThisWorkbook.SaveAs Filename:=strFullFileName, FileFormat:=xlOpenXMLWorkbook

ClosingStatements:
    Application.EnableEvents = True
    Application.DisplayAlerts = True
    Exit Sub
ErrHandler:
    Call MsgBox("Run-time error '" & Err.Number & "': " & Err.Description & vbNewLine & _
         "While running: " & C_PROC_NAME & IIf(Erl <> 0, vbNewLine & "Error Line: " & Erl, "")
    GoTo ClosingStatements

End Sub

Function isFileOpen(ByVal Filename As String) As Boolean

    Dim ff As Long, ErrNo As Long

    On Error Resume Next
    ff = FreeFile()
    Open Filename For Input Lock Read As #ff
    Close ff
    ErrNo = Err
    On Error GoTo 0

    Select Case ErrNo
        Case 0:    isFileOpen = False
        Case 70:   isFileOpen = True
    End Select

End Function

Function isWorkbookOpen(ByVal Filename As String) As Boolean

    Dim wb As Workbook, ErrNo As Long

    On Error Resume Next
    Set wb = Workbooks(Filename)
    ErrNo = Err
    On Error GoTo 0

    Select Case ErrNo
        Case 0:         isWorkbookOpen = True
        Case Else:      isWorkbookOpen = False
    End Select

End Function

Explanation of part 1: This whole thing might seem a bit overkill, but all the error handling is important here to take into account potential errors and make sure that the setting for Application.EnableEvents is turned back to TRUE even if an error occurs. Otherwise, all event macros will be disabled in your Excel application.

2 - Call the SaveAsCustomWindow procedure inside the Workbook_BeforeSave event procedure like this:

Private Sub Workbook_BeforeSave(ByVal SaveAsUI As Boolean, Cancel As Boolean)

    'Your code

    If ThisWorkbook.Path = "" Then
        SaveAsCustomWindow
        Cancel = True
    End If

End Sub

Note that we need to set the variable Cancel = True in order to prevent the default SaveAs window to show up. Also, the if statement is there to make sure that the custom SaveAs window will only be used if the file has never been saved.

2
  • isn't isWorkbookOpen the same as isFileOpen ? Jun 12, 2018 at 17:50
  • 1
    Not exactly. isWorkbookOpen will return True only when the workbook is open in the current Excel application. And isFileOpen will return True if the file is open in another Excel application on the same computer or by someone else (if the file is on a shared drive). Jun 13, 2018 at 14:40
0

To answer your questions:

Is it possible to prevent this message from appearing?

Yes, using the Application.DisplayAlerts property

Is it possible to have Excel assume that the user wants to continue with a macro-free workbook?

No, you have to write the procedure to save the workbook and bypass the SaveAs excel event and save the workbook using the user input (Path & Filename) with the required format.

The following procedure uses a FileDialog to capture the Path and Filename from the user then saves the file without displaying the warning message. I have added some explanatory comments nevertheless, let me know of any questions you might have.

Copy these procedures in the ThisWorkbook module:

Private Sub Workbook_BeforeSave(ByVal SaveAsUI As Boolean, Cancel As Boolean)
    Cancel = True       'Prevents repetitive Save
    Call Workbook_BeforeSave_ApplySettings_And_Save
    End Sub


Private Sub Workbook_BeforeSave_ApplySettings_And_Save()
Dim fd As FileDialog, sFilename As String

    Rem Sets FileDialog to capture user input
    Set fd = Application.FileDialog(msoFileDialogSaveAs)
    With fd
        .InitialView = msoFileDialogViewDetails
        .Title = vbNullString               'Resets default value in case it was changed
        .ButtonName = vbNullString          'Resets default value in case it was changed
        .AllowMultiSelect = False
        If .Show = 0 Then Exit Sub          'User pressed the Cancel Button
        sFilename = .SelectedItems(1)
    End With

    With ThisWorkbook

        Do While .Connections.Count > 0
            .Connections.Item(.Connections.Count).Delete
        Loop

        Application.EnableEvents = False                                'Prevents repetition of the Workbook_BeforeSave event
        Application.DisplayAlerts = False                               'Prevents Display of the warning message
        On Error Resume Next                                            'Prevents Events and Display staying disable in case of error
        .SaveAs Filename:=sFilename, FileFormat:=xlOpenXMLWorkbook      'Saves Template as standard excel using user input
        If Err.Number <> 0 Then
            MsgBox "Run-time error " & Err.Number & String(2, vbLf) _
                & Err.Description & String(2, vbLf) _
                & vbTab & "Process will be cancelled.", _
                vbOKOnly, "Microsoft Visual Basic"
        End If
        On Error GoTo 0
        Application.DisplayAlerts = True
        Application.EnableEvents = True

    End With

    End Sub

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