15

How can I use argv values with int128_t support? I know about atoi() and family of functions exposed by <cstdlib> but somehow I cannot find one for int128_t fixed width integer. This might be because of the fact that this type isn't backed by either c or c++ standard, but is there any way for me to make this code work?

#include <iostream>

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    __int128_t value = atoint128_t(argv[1]);
}

Almost all answers posted are good enough for me but I'm selecting the one that is a drop by solution for my current code, so do look at other ones too.

  • what's the sizeof intmax_t? – Antti Haapala Aug 10 '17 at 8:35
  • 3
    What about implementing your own atoint128_t ? Once the 128 bit integer becomes part of the standard, you will switch your implementation to a wrapper calling standard function. – Marian Aug 10 '17 at 8:36
  • 1
    I doubt there is a function available. Try writing your own implementation. A quick google search revealed something: github.com/apache/orc/blob/master/c%2B%2B/src/Int128.cc#L355 - Otheriwse you can take a look at some of the Big Integer libraries available. Although I am not a fan of recommending libraries, you might want to take a look at one. – Freakyy Aug 10 '17 at 8:37
  • In C11 if something like int128_t exists then intmax_t should cover it... (but yeah, it doesn't, there is __int128_t... – Antti Haapala Aug 10 '17 at 8:39
  • 5
    atoi() is already bad by design since it doesn't use error handling. What you are looking for is rather strtolll, if there existed such a type as long long long. – Lundin Aug 10 '17 at 9:18
3

Here is a C++ implementation:

#include <string>
#include <stdexcept>

__int128_t atoint128_t(std::string const & in)
{
    __int128_t res = 0;
    size_t i = 0;
    bool sign = false;

    if (in[i] == '-')
    {
        ++i;
        sign = true;
    }

    if (in[i] == '+')
    {
        ++i;
    }

    for (; i < in.size(); ++i)
    {
        const char c = in[i];
        if (not std::isdigit(c)) 
            throw std::runtime_error(std::string("Non-numeric character: ") + c)
        res *= 10;
        res += c - '0';
    }

    if (sign)
    {
        res *= -1;
    }

    return res;
}

int main()
{
  __int128_t a = atoint128_t("170141183460469231731687303715884105727");
}

If you want to test it then there is a stream operator here.

Performance

I ran a few performance test. I generate 100,000 random numbers uniformly distributed in the entire support of __int128_t. Then I converted each of them 2000 times. All of these (200,000,000) conversions where completed within ~12 seconds. Using this code:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <random>
#include <vector>
#include <chrono>

int main()
{
    std::mt19937 gen(0);
    std::uniform_int_distribution<> num(0, 9);
    std::uniform_int_distribution<> len(1, 38);
    std::uniform_int_distribution<> sign(0, 1);

    std::vector<std::string> str;

    for (int i = 0; i < 100000; ++i)
    {
        std::string s;
        int l = len(gen);
        if (sign(gen))
            s += '-';
        for (int u = 0; u < l; ++u)
            s += std::to_string(num(gen));
        str.emplace_back(s);
    }

    namespace sc = std::chrono;
    auto start =  sc::duration_cast<sc::microseconds>(sc::high_resolution_clock::now().time_since_epoch()).count();
    __int128_t b = 0;
    for (int u = 0; u < 200; ++u)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < str.size(); ++i)
        {
            __int128_t a = atoint128_t(str[i]);
            b += a;
        }
    }
    auto time =  sc::duration_cast<sc::microseconds>(sc::high_resolution_clock::now().time_since_epoch()).count() - start;
    std::cout << time / 1000000. << 's' << std::endl;
}
  • 1
    @Jonas Paul R actually meant that you are missing all negative numbers here. eg -12 is still a valid __int128_t – Abhinav Gauniyal Aug 10 '17 at 9:21
  • 3
    @Jonas it's easy to factor out if you create a second vector containing the C strings. That said, the real performance could be quite fine if the target CPU supports multiplying at least 64bit numbers, while my approach suffers from the fact I can't use "hardware carries" in C, therefore wasting time on checking single bits. So for "only" 128 bit, there's a good chance your "naive" approach is faster. The larger the numbers get, though -- you know ;) – user2371524 Aug 10 '17 at 11:58
  • 2
    @Jonas I'll add that to my answer, so it doesn't look like trying to "discredit" the naive approach. – user2371524 Aug 10 '17 at 12:04
  • 1
    You should check for integer overflow. – nwellnhof Aug 10 '17 at 12:39
  • 2
    I am sad to see this code get more votes than carefully honed C versions. I guess a java or a javascript version would be even more rewarded. – chqrlie Aug 10 '17 at 18:20
3

Adding here a "not-so-naive" implementation in pure C, it's still kind of simple:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <inttypes.h>

__int128 atoi128(const char *s)
{
    while (*s == ' ' || *s == '\t' || *s == '\n' || *s == '+') ++s;
    int sign = 1;
    if (*s == '-')
    {
        ++s;
        sign = -1;
    }
    size_t digits = 0;
    while (s[digits] >= '0' && s[digits] <= '9') ++digits;
    char scratch[digits];
    for (size_t i = 0; i < digits; ++i) scratch[i] = s[i] - '0';
    size_t scanstart = 0;

    __int128 result = 0;
    __int128 mask = 1;
    while (scanstart < digits)
    {
        if (scratch[digits-1] & 1) result |= mask;
        mask <<= 1;
        for (size_t i = digits-1; i > scanstart; --i)
        {
            scratch[i] >>= 1;
            if (scratch[i-1] & 1) scratch[i] |= 8;
        }
        scratch[scanstart] >>= 1;
        while (scanstart < digits && !scratch[scanstart]) ++scanstart;
        for (size_t i = scanstart; i < digits; ++i)
        {
            if (scratch[i] > 7) scratch[i] -= 3;
        }
    }

    return result * sign;
}


int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    if (argc > 1)
    {
        __int128 x = atoi128(argv[1]);
        printf("%" PRIi64 "\n", (int64_t)x); // just for demo with smaller numbers
    }
}

It reads the number bit by bit, using a shifted BCD scratch space, see Double dabble for the algorithm (it's reversed here). This is a lot more efficient than doing many multiplications by 10 in general. *)

This relies on VLAs, without them, you can replace

char scratch[digits];

with

char *scratch = malloc(digits);
if (!scratch) return 0;

and add a

free(scratch);

at the end of the function.

Of course, the code above has the same limitations as the original atoi() (e.g. it will produce "random" garbage on overflow and has no way to check for that) .. if you need strtol()-style guarantees and error checking, extend it yourself (not a big problem, just work to do).


*) Of course, implementing double dabble in C always suffers from the fact you can't use "hardware carries", so there are extra bit masking and testing operations necessary. On the other hand, "naively" multiplying by 10 can be very efficient, as long as the platform provides multiplication instructions with a width "close" to your target type. Therefore, on your typical x86_64 platform (which has instructions for multiplying 64bit integers), this code is probably a lot slower than the naive decimal method. But it scales much better to really huge integers (which you would implement e.g. using arrays of uintmax_t).

  • alloca() is also an option if VLAs aren't available. If char scratch[digits]; is acceptable, char *scratch = alloca( digits ); is also acceptable. – Andrew Henle Aug 10 '17 at 11:25
  • 1
    @AndrewHenle alloca() isn't in any standard AFAIK. If it's available, VLAs are probably available as well, as long as it isn't a C89-only compiler. – user2371524 Aug 10 '17 at 11:28
  • Same corner issues min_value UB and + sign – chux - Reinstate Monica Aug 10 '17 at 17:22
  • @chux + is accounted for. Min value isn't, if its absolute is larger than max value. That's not trivial, btw. – user2371524 Aug 10 '17 at 17:31
  • @FelixPalmen I now see the '+' at the end of the while(), yet this code now passes "+++123", unlike aoti(). – chux - Reinstate Monica Aug 10 '17 at 17:34
3

Here's a simple way of implementing this:

__int128_t atoint128_t(const char *s)
{
    const char *p = s;
    __int128_t val = 0;

    if (*p == '-' || *p == '+') {
        p++;
    }
    while (*p >= '0' && *p <= '9') {
        val = (10 * val) + (*p - '0');
        p++;
    }
    if (*s == '-') val = val * -1;
    return val;
}

This code checks each character to see if it's a digit (with an optional leading + or -), and if so it multiplies the current result by 10 and adds the value associated with that digit. It then inverts the sign if need be.

Note that this implementation does not check for overflow, which is consistent with the behavior of atoi.

EDIT:

Revised implementation that covers int128_MIN case by either adding or subtracting the value of each digit based on the sign, and skipping leading whitespace.

int myatoi(const char *s)
{
    const char *p = s;
    int neg = 0, val = 0;

    while ((*p == '\n') || (*p == '\t') || (*p == ' ') ||
           (*p == '\f') || (*p == '\r') || (*p == '\v')) {
        p++;
    }
    if ((*p == '-') || (*p == '+')) {
        if (*p == '-') {
            neg = 1;
        }
        p++;
    }
    while (*p >= '0' && *p <= '9') {
        if (neg) {
            val = (10 * val) - (*p - '0');
        } else {
            val = (10 * val) + (*p - '0');
        }
        p++;
    }
    return val;
}
  • Corner case UB with int128_MIN. The usual UB is acceptable, but still UB. – chux - Reinstate Monica Aug 10 '17 at 17:25
  • 1
    @chux Good catch. Revised to handle int128_MIN. – dbush Aug 10 '17 at 17:36
  • @chqrlie Thanks. Added that as well. – dbush Aug 10 '17 at 18:11
  • @dbush: isspace((unsigned char)*p) would be more efficient than a pack if 6 tests. – chqrlie Aug 10 '17 at 18:15
3

is there any way for me to make this code work?

"What about implementing your own atoint128_t ?" @Marian


It is not to hard to roll your own atoint128_t().

Points to consider.

  1. There is 0 or 1 more representable negative value than positive values. Accumulating the value using negative numbers provides more range.

  2. Overflow is not defined for atoi(). Perhaps provide a capped value and set errno? Detecting potential OF prevents UB.

  3. __int128_t constants need careful code to form correctly.

  4. How to handle unusual input? atoi() is fairly loose and made sense years ago for speed/size, yet less UB is usually desired these days. Candidate cases: "", " ", "-", "z", "+123", "999..many...999", "the min int128", "locale_specific_space" + " 123" or even non-string NULL.

  5. Code to do atoi() and atoint128_t() need only vary on the type, range, and names. The algorithm is the same.

    #if 1
      #define int_t __int128_t
      #define int_MAX (((__int128_t)0x7FFFFFFFFFFFFFFF << 64) + 0xFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF)
      #define int_MIN (-1 - int_MAX)
      #define int_atoi atoint128_t
    #else
      #define int_t int
      #define int_MAX INT_MAX
      #define int_MIN INT_MIN
      #define int_atoi int_atoi
    #endif
    

Sample code: Tailor as needed. Relies on C99 or later negative/positive and % functionality.

int_t int_atoi(const char *s) {
  if (s == NULL) {  // could omit this test
    errno = EINVAL;
    return 0;
  }
  while (isspace((unsigned char ) *s)) {  // skip same leading white space like atoi()
    s++;
  }
  char sign = *s;  // remember if the sign was `-` for later
  if (sign == '-' || sign == '+') {
    s++;
  }

  int_t sum = 0;
  while (isdigit((unsigned char)*s)) {
    int digit = *s - '0';
    if ((sum > int_MIN/10) || (sum == int_MIN/10 && digit <= -(int_MIN%10))) {
      sum = sum * 10 - digit;  // accumulate on the - side
    } else {
      sum = int_MIN;
      errno = ERANGE;
      break; // overflow
    }
    s++;
  }

  if (sign != '-') {
    if (sum < -int_MAX) {
      sum = int_MAX;
      errno = ERANGE;
    } else {
      sum = -sum;  // Make positive
    }
  }

  return sum;
}

As @Lundin commented about the lack of overflow detection, etc. Modeling the string-->int128 after strtol() is a better idea.

For simplicity, consider __128_t strto__128_base10(const char *s, char *endptr);

This answer all ready handles overflow and flags errno like strtol(). Just need a few changes:

  bool digit_found = false;
  while (isdigit((unsigned char)*s)) { 
    digit_found = true;  

      // delete the `break` 
      // On overflow, continue looping to get to the end of the digits.
      // break;


  // after the `while()` loop:
  if (!digit_found) {  // optional test
    errno = EINVAL;
  }
  if (endptr) {
    *endptr = digit_found ? s : original_s;
  }

A full long int strtol(const char *nptr, char **endptr, int base); like functionality would also handle other bases with special code when base is 0 or 16. @chqrlie

2

The C Standard does not mandate support for 128-bit integers.

Yet they are commonly supported by modern compilers: both gcc and clang support the types __int128_t and __uint128_t, but surprisingly still keep intmax_t and uintmax_t limited to 64 bits.

Beyond the basic arithmetic operators, there is not much support for these large integers, especially in the C library: no scanf() or printf() conversion specifiers, etc.

Here is an implementation of strtoi128(), strtou128() and atoi128() that is consistent with the C Standard's atoi(), strtol() and strtoul() specifications.

#include <ctype.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

/* Change these typedefs for your local flavor of 128-bit integer types */
typedef __int128_t i128;
typedef __uint128_t u128;

static int strdigit__(char c) {
    /* This is ASCII / UTF-8 specific, would not work for EBCDIC */
    return (c >= '0' && c <= '9') ? c - '0'
        :  (c >= 'a' && c <= 'z') ? c - 'a' + 10
        :  (c >= 'A' && c <= 'Z') ? c - 'A' + 10
        :  255;
}

static u128 strtou128__(const char *p, char **endp, int base) {
    u128 v = 0;
    int digit;

    if (base == 0) {    /* handle octal and hexadecimal syntax */
        base = 10;
        if (*p == '0') {
            base = 8;
            if ((p[1] == 'x' || p[1] == 'X') && strdigit__(p[2]) < 16) {
                p += 2;
                base = 16;
            }
        }
    }
    if (base < 2 || base > 36) {
        errno = EINVAL;
    } else
    if ((digit = strdigit__(*p)) < base) {
        v = digit;
        /* convert to unsigned 128 bit with overflow control */
        while ((digit = strdigit__(*++p)) < base) {
            u128 v0 = v;
            v = v * base + digit;
            if (v < v0) {
                v = ~(u128)0;
                errno = ERANGE;
            }
        }
        if (endp) {
            *endp = (char *)p;
        }
    }
    return v;
}

u128 strtou128(const char *p, char **endp, int base) {
    if (endp) {
        *endp = (char *)p;
    }
    while (isspace((unsigned char)*p)) {
        p++;
    }
    if (*p == '-') {
        p++;
        return -strtou128__(p, endp, base);
    } else {
        if (*p == '+')
            p++;
        return strtou128__(p, endp, base);
    }
}

i128 strtoi128(const char *p, char **endp, int base) {
    u128 v;

    if (endp) {
        *endp = (char *)p;
    }
    while (isspace((unsigned char)*p)) {
        p++;
    }
    if (*p == '-') {
        p++;
        v = strtou128__(p, endp, base);
        if (v >= (u128)1 << 127) {
            if (v > (u128)1 << 127)
                errno = ERANGE;
            return -(i128)(((u128)1 << 127) - 1) - 1;
        }
        return -(i128)v;
    } else {
        if (*p == '+')
            p++;
        v = strtou128__(p, endp, base);
        if (v >= (u128)1 << 127) {
            errno = ERANGE;
            return (i128)(((u128)1 << 127) - 1);
        }
        return (i128)v;
    }
}

i128 atoi128(const char *p) {
    return strtoi128(p, (char**)NULL, 10);
}

char *utoa128(char *dest, u128 v, int base) {
    char buf[129];
    char *p = buf + 128;
    const char *digits = "0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";

    *p = '\0';
    if (base >= 2 && base <= 36) {
        while (v > (unsigned)base - 1) {
            *--p = digits[v % base];
            v /= base;
        }
        *--p = digits[v];
    }
    return strcpy(dest, p);
}

char *itoa128(char *buf, i128 v, int base) {
    char *p = buf;
    u128 uv = (u128)v;
    if (v < 0) {
        *p++ = '-';
        uv = -uv;
    }
    if (base == 10)
        utoa128(p, uv, 10);
    else
    if (base == 16)
        utoa128(p, uv, 16);
    else
        utoa128(p, uv, base);
    return buf;
}

static char *perrno(char *buf, int err) {
    switch (err) {
    case EINVAL:
        return strcpy(buf, "EINVAL");
    case ERANGE:
        return strcpy(buf, "ERANGE");
    default:
        sprintf(buf, "%d", err);
        return buf;
    }
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    char buf[130];
    char xbuf[130];
    char ebuf[20];
    char *p1, *p2;
    i128 v, v1;
    u128 v2;
    int i;

    for (i = 1; i < argc; i++) {
        printf("%s:\n", argv[i]);
        errno = 0;
        v = atoi128(argv[i]);
        perrno(ebuf, errno);
        printf("  atoi128():   %s  0x%s  errno=%s\n",
               itoa128(buf, v, 10), utoa128(xbuf, v, 16), ebuf);
        errno = 0;
        v1 = strtoi128(argv[i], &p1, 0);
        perrno(ebuf, errno);
        printf("  strtoi128(): %s  0x%s  endptr:\"%s\"  errno=%s\n",
               itoa128(buf, v1, 10), utoa128(xbuf, v1, 16), p1, ebuf);
        errno = 0;
        v2 = strtou128(argv[i], &p2, 0);
        perrno(ebuf, errno);
        printf("  strtou128(): %s  0x%s  endptr:\"%s\"  errno=%s\n",
               utoa128(buf, v2, 10), utoa128(xbuf, v2, 16), p2, ebuf);
    }
    return 0;
}

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