62

When you have string in C, you can add direct hex code inside.

char str[] = "abcde"; // 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 0x00
char str2[] = "abc\x12\x34"; // 'a', 'b', 'c', 0x12, 0x34, 0x00

Both examples have 6 bytes in memory. Now the problem exists if you want to add value [a-fA-F0-9] after hex entry.

//I want: 'a', 'b', 'c', 0x12, 'e', 0x00
//Error, hex is too big because last e is treated as part of hex thus becoming 0x12e
char problem[] = "abc\x12e";

Possible solution is to replace after definition.

//This will work, bad idea
char solution[6] = "abcde";
solution[3] = 0x12;

This can work, but it will fail, if you put it as const.

//This will not work
const char solution[6] = "abcde";
solution[3] = 0x12; //Compilation error!

How to properly insert e after \x12 without triggering error?


Why I'm asking? When you want to build UTF-8 string as constant, you have to use hex values of character if it is larger than ASCII table can hold.

1
  • 2
    Duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/35180528/…. I'll close that one as I think the answers posted here are more complete, with the standard quoted inside the answer rather than in comments.
    – Lundin
    Aug 10, 2017 at 12:41

3 Answers 3

73

Use 3 octal digits:

char problem[] = "abc\022e";

or split your string:

char problem[] = "abc\x12" "e";

Why these work:

  • Unlike hex escapes, standard defines 3 digits as maximum amount for octal escape.

    6.4.4.4 Character constants

    ...

    octal-escape-sequence:
        \ octal-digit
        \ octal-digit octal-digit
        \ octal-digit octal-digit octal-digit
    

    ...

    hexadecimal-escape-sequence:
        \x hexadecimal-digit
        hexadecimal-escape-sequence hexadecimal-digit
    
  • String literal concatenation is defined as a later translation phase than literal escape character conversion.

    5.1.1.2 Translation phases

    ...

    1. Each source character set member and escape sequence in character constants and string literals is converted to the corresponding member of the execution character set; if there is no corresponding member, it is converted to an implementation- defined member other than the null (wide) character. 8)

    2. Adjacent string literal tokens are concatenated.

2
  • 10
    A third alternative is to do everything explicitly: char solution[] = {'a', 'b', 'c', 0x12, 'e', '\0'};
    – Lundin
    Aug 10, 2017 at 12:38
  • 7
    Or even offset the escapes "string" altogether. "abc" "\x12" "e"; for clarity. Aug 10, 2017 at 12:38
27

Since string literals are concatenated early on in the compilation process, but after the escaped-character conversion, you can just use:

char problem[] = "abc\x12" "e";

though you may prefer full separation for readability:

char problem[] = "abc" "\x12" "e";

For the language lawyers amongst us, this is covered in C11 5.1.1.2 Translation phases (my emphasis):

  1. Each source character set member and escape sequence in character constants and string literals is converted to the corresponding member of the execution character set; if there is no corresponding member, it is converted to an implementation-defined member other than the null (wide) character.

  2. Adjacent string literal tokens are concatenated.

7

Why I'm asking? When you want to build UTF-8 string as constant, you have to use hex values of character is larger than ASCII table can hold.

Well, no. You don't have to. As of C11, you can prefix your string constant with u8, which tells the compiler that the character literal is in UTF-8.

char solution[] = u8"no need to use hex-codes á駵";

(Same thing is supported by C++11 as well, by the way)

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  • 3
    People might be fishing for the non-printable characters 0 to 31 of the classic 7 bit ASCII table.
    – Lundin
    Aug 10, 2017 at 13:22
  • 1
    @Lundin Shouldn't they rather omit character 0...?
    – CiaPan
    Aug 10, 2017 at 21:05
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    @Damon C and C++ are different languages. The C standard isn't the same (I searched it for your text and it did not come up). You can use universal character constants, e.g. u8"\u12345678", because backslash, u, 1 etc. are in the source character set; however the denoted unicode character might not be in the source character set. The source code is only allowed to contain characters from the source character set, which could be 7-bit ASCII for example (this is unrelated to the execution character set).
    – M.M
    Aug 15, 2017 at 9:24
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    @Damon this is a C question, and the C Standard exists, there is literally no reason to involve C++
    – M.M
    Aug 15, 2017 at 10:21
  • 1
    I already did and explained in my previous comment. universal-character-name is allowed because all of the characters comprising such a thing are in the basic source character set, but unicode characters may not be. It's implementation-defined what is in the extended source character set and that could be empty.
    – M.M
    Aug 15, 2017 at 12:32

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