I have an issue with the space-evenly value for justify-content on Chrome mobile (it works fine on Desktop and on Firefox mobile).

I managed to produce a minimal example: Example

I have a flex container in a row direction and I want the elements to be spaced evenly, as intended when using space-evenly. It works on desktop, but on Chrome mobile (version 59 on Android), however, the elements are aligned on the left. Here is a comparison of the two: Comparison

center and space-around values work as intended, however, but I really want to use space-evenly or an equivalent (the flex-wrap: wrap behavior is also important to me).

Here is my HTML:

<div class="container">
  <div class="element"></div>
  <div class="element"></div>
  <div class="element"></div>
</div>

And here is my CSS:

.container {
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: row;
  justify-content: space-evenly;
  flex-wrap: wrap;
  background: lightgrey;
}

.element {
  margin: 8px;
  width: 42px;
  height: 42px;
  background: black;
}

Thanks in advance!

  • Try removing flex wrap. It should work – Anmol Sandal Aug 10 '17 at 11:56
  • @AnmolSandal I just tried that and the problem is still there :/ – Maverick Chardet Aug 10 '17 at 11:58
  • 2
    space-evenly, unlike other layout options, has limited support across browsers. It is only recently introduced and has not made its way to mobile Chrome yet (or in fact, most mobile browsers don't support it). It is actually first implemented in grid, and then ported over to flexbox. When a browser fails to recognize this value, it falls back to flex-start, which is what you see on mobile Chrome. – Terry Aug 10 '17 at 12:07
  • 1
    You should put the most supported value last, i.e. declare space-evenly first, and then put your fallbacks after it. Not recognized === fallback to default, i.e. flex-start. It does not mean ignoring the rule. – Terry Aug 10 '17 at 12:13
  • 3
    @Terry You always put the fallback first and then the newer properties/values,... so in this case it is wrong to put the space-evenly first, it should be last. – LGSon Aug 10 '17 at 17:29
up vote 4 down vote accepted

There is no solution yet for multi-line/wrapped space-evenly for browsers that doesn't support it.

When using flex-wrap: wrap you will need to i.e. set a fixed padding on the flex container, margin on the items or use a script.

If it is possible to wrap each row you can use the pseudo elements in combination with space-between to achieve the exact same result as space-evenly give.

In below sample the space-between will take the zero width pseudo elements into account when calculating the space between, hence producing the same result.

.container {
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: row;
  justify-content: space-between;
  /* flex-wrap: wrap; */
  /* align-items: flex-start;        if "img", this will prevent it from stretching  */
  background: lightgrey;
}

.element {
  margin: 8px;
  width: 42px;
  height: 42px;
  background: black;
}

.container::before,
.container::after {
  content: '';
}
<div class="container">
  <div class="element"></div>
  <div class="element"></div>
  <div class="element"></div>
</div>

  • Thanks for the clear answer! Do you know by any chance if there is a "proper" wait to detect, either with CSS media queries or with some JS, if the browser supports space-evenly correctly for flexboxes? – Maverick Chardet Aug 10 '17 at 20:14
  • @MaverickChardet The proper way is to use @support, though as already mentioned, for newly introduced properties/property values one always risk to get false positive's, so I recommend to wait until the majority of browsers support a given property/value. – LGSon Aug 10 '17 at 20:26
  • Just a straight up swap out of justify-content: space-evenly; for justify-content: space-between; worked for me! – doublejosh Sep 27 '17 at 23:21

Update This seems to be a work around only for a single row

You may fake space-evenly via margins and eventually a pseudo element.

.container {
  display:flex;
}
.element,.container:before  {
  border:solid;
  margin:0 auto 0 0;
  padding:1em;
}
.container:before {
  content:'';
  border:none;
  padding:0;
}
<div class="container">
  <div class="element">11</div>
  <div class="element">2 </div>
  <div class="element">3333</div>
  <div class="element">444</div>
</div>

or nth-child as suggested by @IlyaStreltsyn

Or even without a pseudo element: .element:first-child { margin: 0 auto; }

  • 1
    Or even without a pseudo element: .element:first-child { margin: 0 auto; }. – Ilya Streltsyn Aug 10 '17 at 12:58
  • That looks like a promising solution, but when I add flex-wrap: wrap; to the container and one element is sent to the next row, this element is not centered like it should be with space-evenly, is there a way to add this behavior? – Maverick Chardet Aug 10 '17 at 13:48
  • @MaverickChardet can you produce an example to check out if there is any media querie, min-width or numbers of children or any else situation that would allow some filtering via css selectors ? – G-Cyr Aug 10 '17 at 14:37
  • @GCyrillus I'm not sure that I understand what you're asking, but the real case scenario will be exactly like the example I gave in my first post, except that the elements will contain a <h3> title and a <ul> list. If it's impossible to simulate space-evenly with flex-wrap: wrap in the general case, is it easier to consider that there will always be 3 elements (which is my situation at the moment even though it might change later)? – Maverick Chardet Aug 10 '17 at 15:47
  • In theory, it could be solved by switching the container to display:grid (using @supports) and giving it grid-template-columns:repeat(auto-fit,42px). Unfortunately, the same Chrome versions that had bug with space-evenly in Flexbox had also a bug with auto-fit in Grid (they add unused grid columns in the right). So I don't see any easy solution here, unfortunately. – Ilya Streltsyn Aug 10 '17 at 15:50

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