28

I need to make SQL queries to database in the loop:

for rows.Next() {

   fields, err := db.Query(.....)
   if err != nil {
      // ...
   }
   defer fields.Close()

   // do something with `fields`

}

What will be better: leave all as is or move defer after loop:

for rows.Next() {

   fields, err := db.Query(.....)
   if err != nil {
      // ...
   }

   // do something with `fields`
}

defer fields.Close()

Or something else ?

46

The whole point of defer is that it does not execute until the function returns, so the appropriate place to put it would be immediately after the resource you want to close is opened. However, since you're creating the resource inside the loop, you should not use defer at all - otherwise, you're not going to close any of the resources created inside the loop until the function exits, so they'll pile up until then. Instead, you should close them at the end of each loop iteration, without defer:

for rows.Next() {

   fields, err := db.Query(.....)
   if err != nil {
      // ...
   }

   // do something with `fields`

   fields.Close()
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Adding to this, in this case the defer won't even work as the OP expects, as it will only close the last fields from the loop (it needs a closure to work correctly). Wrapping the loop inner body in an anonymous func with a defer might be a good solution, btw. – Martin Tournoij Aug 10 '17 at 15:25
  • True - but even with the closure to work correctly, it will still not work well. – Adrian Aug 10 '17 at 15:27
  • 1
    It's the other way. If you use closure for defer only the last one will be called. For defer fields.Close() each call will correctly point to different pointer, of course, it's still wrong as all will be called once the func finishes. – Kamil Dziedzic Aug 8 '18 at 9:16
  • Does it mean that if you allocate multiple resources within each iteration of a loop, and error happens, and you panic inside the if clause without closing each opened resource first, resources allocated during last iteration won't be properly closed? I.e. in for loops one can not rely on automatic resource clean up and has to manually clean all resources allocated within this loop iteration in case of error? – Ben Usman Sep 7 '18 at 15:08
  • If you don't defer closure and you recover the panic without closing the resources in the recovery, yes, you may leak resources, regardless of everything else. Panics should be rare and generally should be fatal. If you're going to recover panics, you should be keenly aware of the repercussions. – Adrian Sep 7 '18 at 16:27
65

Execution of a deferred function is not only delayed, deferred to the moment the surrounding function returns, it is also executed even if the enclosing function terminates abruptly, e.g. panics. Spec: Defer statements:

A "defer" statement invokes a function whose execution is deferred to the moment the surrounding function returns, either because the surrounding function executed a return statement, reached the end of its function body, or because the corresponding goroutine is panicking.

Whenever you create a value or a resource that provides means to properly close it / dispose of it, you should always use a defer statement to make sure it is released even if your other code panics to prevent leaking memory or other system resources.

It's true that if you're allocating resources in a loop you should not simply use defer, as then releasing resources will not happen as early as it could and should (at the end of each iteration), only after the for statement (only after all iterations).

What you should do is that if you have a snippet that allocates such resources, wrap it in a function –either an anonymous or a named function–, and in that function you may use defer, and resources will be freed as soon as they are no longer needed, and what's important is that even if there is a bug in your code which may panic.

Example:

for rows.Next() {
    func() {
        fields, err := db.Query(...)
        if err != nil {
            // Handle error and return
            return
        }
        defer fields.Close()

        // do something with `fields`
    }()
}

Or if put in a named function:

func foo(rs *db.Rows) {
    fields, err := db.Query(...)
    if err != nil {
        // Handle error and return
        return
    }
    defer fields.Close()

    // do something with `fields`
}

And calling it:

for rows.Next() {
    foo(rs)
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 14
    This answer is clearly better than the accepted one as it takes panics into account AND provides a good sample solution. – Karma Fusebox Sep 8 '18 at 15:05

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.