can somebody suggest an alternative to Runtime.getRuntime().exec function of java. I am passing a unix command as an argument to this function but it causes a memory issue. Runtime.getRuntime().exec forks a new process with exactly the same amount of memory as being occupied by java process, causing the memory requirement to double which is exactly what I don't want.

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    When a process forks like this, it doesn't double the memory, instead it marks the memory as copy-on-write. The child process doesn't use additional memory except for what it uses. – Peter Lawrey Dec 30 '10 at 11:41
  • "causing the memory requirement to double": What evidence do you have that the memory requirement is doubled? Do you have some measurements, or is it just your assumption that this is so? I am skeptical. – Raedwald Dec 30 '10 at 12:06
  • Hi Raedwald, I was wrong in sayign that the mem requirement doubles. However, after I conducted a few tests, I observed that I can run my simplest java program with a -Xms3850m on my unix box. However, when I put a line "Runtime.getRuntime.exec("test.sh")" in my java program, -Xms must not be greater than 2500m and that means Runtime.getRuntime.exec is consuming 1350 mb. As test.sh is a very simple script, it doesn't take more than a few mb when I run it independently on unix box. Can you please suggest how do I guide my java program to use less memory instead of using 1350 mb? Thanks – Meraj alam Jan 3 '11 at 2:31
  • Meraj Alam, Did you find the answer for your question, is there way we could guide Java to dont allocate the same memory while run Runtime.Exec() command ?. – user1143854 Jan 11 '12 at 18:23

This is optional and depends on the operating system. On Linux, the memory is "lazyly" allocated, until really needed. The keywords you look for are "memory overcommit", which is a situation that can arise here.

Read "How does fork handle memory", or this to learn more. You probably have disabled the overcommit behaviour, so your forked process always allocates all memory immediately.

  • Hi. I was wrong in sayign that the mem requirement doubles, however it really increases significantly(1300mb in my case). After I conducted a few tests, I observed that I can run my simplest java program with -Xms3850m on my unix box. However, when I put a line "Runtime.getRuntime.exec("test.sh")" in my java program, -Xms must not be greater than 2500m and that means Runtime.getRuntime.exec is consuming 1350 mb. – Meraj alam Jan 3 '11 at 6:22
  • As test.sh is a very simple script, it doesn't take more than a few mb when I run it independently on unix box. Can you please suggest how do I guide my java program to use less memory instead of using 1350 mb? Thanks – Meraj alam Jan 3 '11 at 6:23
  • Hi Daniel, the link for overcommit makes perfect sense. However, I am unable to use it. Kindly guide me how to set it. – Meraj alam Jan 3 '11 at 6:39
  • I don't know your OS, the version etc., but if its linux it should something you can control by using sysctl, and its companion config file. – Daniel Jan 3 '11 at 14:40
  • My Os is Solaris 5.10. – Meraj alam Jan 4 '11 at 2:06

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