How would I create a function that drops NA values in a column if I don't want to specify the column until the function is called?

minimal_case <- function(column_name = "a") {
  enquo_name <- enquo(column_name)

  example <- tibble(a = c(NA, 1))

  print(filter(example, !is.na(a)))

  print(filter(example, !is.na(rlang::UQ(enquo_name))))

}

The output of the first print statement is:

# A tibble: 1 x 1
      a
  <dbl>
1     1

The output of the second print statement is:

# A tibble: 2 x 1
      a
  <dbl>
1    NA
2     1

How do I get the second print statement to match the first?

  • function(df, x) df[!is.na(df[[x]]), ] – Hong Ooi Aug 11 '17 at 1:56
  • 2
    If you're providing a string as the column name, you're using standard evaluation and can skip the whole tidyeval business. – Hong Ooi Aug 11 '17 at 1:57
up vote 2 down vote accepted

It seems the column_name parameter is a string. In that case, you can use rlang::sym:

minimal_case <- function(column_name = "a") {
    example <- tibble(a = c(NA, 1))

    print(filter(example, !is.na(a)))

    print(filter(example, !is.na(!!rlang::sym(column_name))))

}
  • Very helpful to refer to rlang; I had seen the quosure stuff for dplyr but rlang::sym looks like a straightforward way to transition functions that use the old style e.g. mutate_ calls to quosures. – mikeck Aug 11 '17 at 5:23
  • dplyr will soon export sym() as well. The functionalities of sym() and quosures are complementary. – lionel Aug 11 '17 at 7:13

There is a good write-up on how to do things like this in dplyr here: http://dplyr.tidyverse.org/articles/programming.html

The punchline for this case is that you don't have to quote a in the parameters. You can also use !! instead of UQ

minimal_case <- function(column_name = a) {
    enquo_name <- enquo(column_name)

    example <- tibble(a = c(NA, 1))

    print(filter(example, !is.na(a)))

    print(filter(example, !is.na(!!enquo_name)))

}
  • I wouldn't call that variable column_name because "column names" makes me think of strings, e.g. the output of colnames(). Also in your version it's not necessarily a column symbol, it could be an expression too. – lionel Aug 11 '17 at 7:16

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