51

I have seen a lot of Jersey tutorials that starts with something like

@ApplicationPath("services")
public class JerseyApplication extends ResourceConfig {
    public JerseyApplication() {
        packages("com.abc.jersey.services");
    }
}

without explaining what exactly the ResourceConfig class is. So where can I find its documentation, usage, etc.? Googling for "jersey resourceconfig" does not yield any official doc.

Some of my questions about this class and its usage are:

  • What things can I do inside the subclass of ResourceConfig?
  • Do I need to register the subclass of ResourceConfig somewhere so that it can be found or is it automatically detected by Jersey?
  • If the subclass is automatically detected what happens if I have multiple subclasses of ResourceConfig?
  • Is the purpose of ResourceConfig the same as the web.xml file? If so what happens if I have both in my project? Does one of them take precedence over the other?
137

Standard JAX-RS uses an Application as its configuration class. ResourceConfig extends Application.

There are three main different ways (in a servlet container) to configure Jersey (JAX-RS):

  1. With only web.xml
  2. With both web.xml and an Application/ResourceConfig class
  3. With only an Application/ResourceConfig class annotated with @ApplicationPath.

With only web.xml

It is possible to configure the application in a standard JAX-RS way, but the following is specific to Jersey

<web-app>
    <servlet>
        <servlet-name>jersey-servlet</servlet-name>
        <servlet-class>org.glassfish.jersey.servlet.ServletContainer</servlet-class>
        <init-param>
            <param-name>jersey.config.server.provider.packages</param-name>
            <param-value>com.mypackage.to.scan</param-value>
        </init-param>
    </servlet>
    ...
    <servlet-mapping>
        <servlet-name>jersey-servlet</servlet-name>
        <url-pattern>/api/*</url-pattern>
    </servlet-mapping>
    ...
</web-app>

Since Jersey runs in a servlet container, it is only right that the Jersey application runs as a servlet. The Jersey Servlet that handles incoming requests is the ServletContainer. So here we declare it as the <servlet-class>. We also configure an <init-param> telling Jersey which package(s) to scan for our @Path and @Provider classes so it can register them.

Under the hood, Jersey will actually create a ResourceConfig instance, as that's what it uses to configure the application. Then it will register all the classes that it discovers through the package scan.

With both web.xml and Application/ResourceConfig

If we want to programmatically configure our application with an Application or ResourceConfig subclass, we can do so with one change to the above web.xml. Instead of setting an init-param to scan for packages, we use an init-param to declare our Application/ResourceConfig subclass.

<servlet>
    <servlet-name>jersey-servlet</servlet-name>
    <servlet-class>org.glassfish.jersey.servlet.ServletContainer</servlet-class>
    <init-param>
        <param-name>javax.ws.rs.Application</param-name>
        <param-value>com.example.JerseyApplication</param-value>
    </init-param>
    <servlet-mapping>
        <servlet-name>jersey-servlet</servlet-name>
        <url-pattern>/api/*</url-pattern>
    </servlet-mapping>
</servlet>
package com.example;

public class JerseyApplication extends ResourceConfig {
    public JerseyApplication() {
        packages("com.abc.jersey.services");
    }
}

Here, we configure the init-param javax.ws.rs.Application with the fully qualified name of our ResourceConfig subclass. And instead of using the init-param that tells Jersey which package(s) to scan, we just use the convenience method packages() of the ResourceConfig.

We could also use the methods register() and property() to register resources and providers, and to configure Jersey properties. With the property() method, anything that can be configured as an init-param, can also be configured using the property() method. For instance instead of calling packages(), we could do

public JerseyApplication() {
    property("jersey.config.server.provider.packages",
             "com.mypackage.to.scan");
}

With only Application/ResourceConfig

Without a web.xml, Jersey needs a way for us to provide the servlet-mapping. We do this with the @ApplicationPath annotation.

// 'services', '/services', or '/services/*'
// is all the same. Jersey will change it to be '/services/*'
@ApplicationPath("services")
public class JerseyApplication extends ResourceConfig {
    public JerseyApplication() {
        packages("com.abc.jersey.services");
    }
}

Here with the @ApplicationPath, it's just like if we configured the servlet mapping in the web.xml

<servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>JerseyApplication</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>/services/*</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping>

When using only Java code for configuration, there needs to be some way for Jersey to discover our configuration class. This is done with the use of a ServletContanerInitializer. This is something that was introduced in the Servlet 3.0 Specification, so we cannot use "Java only" configuration in earlier servlet containers.

Basically what happens is that the implementor of the initializer can tell the servlet container what classes to look for, and the servlet container will pass those classes to the initializer onStartup() method. In Jersey's implementation of the initializer, Jersey configures it to look for Application classes and classes annotated with @ApplicationPath. See this post for further explanation. So when the servlet container starts the application, Jersey's initializer will get passed our Application/ResourceConfig class.

What things can I do inside the subclass of ResourceConfig

Just look at the javadoc. Its mostly just registration of classes. Not much else you need to do with it. The main methods you will be using are the register(), packages(), and property() methods. The register() method lets you manually register classes and instances of resources and providers manually. The packages() method, discussed earlier, lists the package(s) you want Jersey to scan for @Path and @Provider classes and register them for you. And the property() method allows you to set some configurable properties 1.

The ResourceConfig is just a convenience class. Remember, it extends Application, so we could even use the standard Application class

@ApplicationPath("/services")
public class JerseyApplication extends Application {
    @Override
    public Set<Class<?>> getClasses() {
        final Set<Class<?>> classes = new HashSet<>();
        classes.add(MyResource.class);
        return classes;
    }
    @Override
    public Set<Object> getSingletons() {
        final Set<Object> singletons = new HashSet<>();
        singletons.add(new MyProvider());
        return singletons;
    }

    @Override
    public Map<String, Object> getProperties() {
        final Map<String, Object> properties = new HashMap<>();
        properties.put("jersey.config.server.provider.packages",
                       "com.mypackage.to.scan");
        return properties;
    }
}

With a ResourceConfig, we would just do

public class JerseyApplication extends ResourceConfig {
    public JerseyApplication() {
        register(MyResource.class);
        register(new MyProvider());
        packages("com.mypackages.to.scan");
    }
}

Aside from being more convenient, there are also a few thing under the hood that help Jersey configure the application.

An SE Environment

All the examples above assume you are running in an installed server environment, e.g. Tomcat. But you can also run the app in an SE environment, where you run an embedded server and start the app from a main method. You will sometimes see these examples when searching around for info, so I want to show what that looks like, so that when you every do come across this, you are not surprised and know how it differs from your setup.

So sometimes you will see an example like

ResourceConfig config = new ResourceConfig();
config.packages("com.my.package");
config.register(SomeFeature.class);
config.property(SOME_PROP, someValue);

What is most likely happening here is that the example is using an embedded server, like Grizzly. The rest of the code to start the server might be something like

public static void main(String[] args) {
    ResourceConfig config = new ResourceConfig();
    config.packages("com.my.package");
    config.register(SomeFeature.class);
    config.property(SOME_PROP, someValue);

    String baseUri = "http://localhost:8080/api/";
    HttpServer server = GrizzlyHttpServerFactory
            .createHttpServer(URI.create(baseUri), config);
    server.start();
}

So in this example, there is a standalone server being started and the ResourceConfig is used to configure Jersey. The different here and from previous examples is that in this example, we are not extending the ResourceConfig, but instead just instantiating it. It wouldn't be any different if we were to do

public class JerseyConfig extends ResourceConfig {
    public JerseyConfig() {
        packages("com.my.package");
        register(SomeFeature.class);
        property(SOME_PROP, someValue);
    }
}

HttpServer server = GrizzlyHttpServerFactory
            .createHttpServer(URI.create(baseUri), new JerseyConfig());

Say you were going through some tutorial, and it showed a configuration for a standalone app, where they instantiate the ResourceConfig, but you are running your app in a servlet container and have been using the earlier configuration where you are extending the ResourceConfig. Well now you know what the difference is and what changes you need to make. I've seen people do some really weird stuff because they didn't understand this difference. For example I saw someone instantiating a ResourceConfig inside a resource class. So this is why I added this extra little piece; so you don't make the same mistake.


Footnotes

1. There are a number of different configurable properties. The link to the ServerProperties are just some general properties. There are also different properties related to specific features. The documentation should mention these properties in the section of the docs related to that feature. For a complete list of all configurable properties, you can look at all the Jersey constants and look for the ones where the string value starts with jersey.config. If you are using a web.xml, then you would use the string value as the init-param param-name. If you are using Java config (ResourceConfig), then you would call property(ServerProperties.SOME_CONF, value)

  • 4
    Thank you for the awesome answer! This clears up tons up things for me. – Chin Aug 11 '17 at 13:07
  • 1
    Beautiful answer - Bravo! – Hypothetical inthe Clavicle Oct 25 '18 at 15:00
  • 1
    Very elaborative and detailed explanation, from the basics. Thanks ! – Mahesh Jan 10 at 16:50
  • Amazing explanation. One of the very best on SOF !! Thanks for sharing this knowledge. – IllegalSkillsException May 27 at 18:29
  • This is an excellent explanation concise and to the point. Cleared many lingering doubts on Jax-rs deployment, thanks a ton... !!! – Roshan Jul 28 at 9:43

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.