24

Consider following case: I have

int bar1();
double bar2();

I want:

foo<bar1>(); // calls bar1, then uses its result.
foo<bar2>(); // calls bar2, then uses its result.

Naive way to write template foo() is to use additional parameter:

template <typename T, T (*f)()> void foo () {
  // call f, do something with result
}

This works, but I need to do ugly syntax:

foo<decltype(bar1()), bar1>(); // calls bar1, then uses its result

I want to write something pretty, like above, just foo<bar1>.

P.S. Please do not recommend to accept argument at runtime. I need compile time parametrization with function pointer only.

P.S. Sorry forget to mention: I am looking for C++14 solution. C++17 appreciated and I upvoted answer with C++17 solution, but project now builds with C++14 and I can not change it in nearest future.

15
  • Can you explain why it needs to be a template parameter? If you need it at compile time, how about making foo be constexpr? Commented Aug 11, 2017 at 14:22
  • 1
    @VaughnCato If you pass bar1 as a function pointer into foo, and foo calls bar1, that call will almost certainly not be inlined unless foo in its entirety is inlined. You may find this surprising as many C++ experts I've talked to expected otherwise. But I've done this experiment a dozen times with std::sort; compare passing a function pointer vs lambda into sort (which is too big to get inlined). Commented Aug 11, 2017 at 14:53
  • 1
    @VaughnCato Your example is incorrect because it assumes that foo gets inlined as well. godbolt.org/g/NTi3oF. Commented Aug 11, 2017 at 14:55
  • 1
    @VaughnCato Incorrect means that you said "it shouldn't be an indirect call in practice", and used that example to back it up. foo not getting inlined is part of practice, so your example does not back up what you said. There is absolutely no reason to think that this is an XY problem, please don't overuse that because it's incredibly frustrating for the question asker. Commented Aug 11, 2017 at 15:04
  • 1
    @VaughnCato, i think, OP demonstrated sufficient proficiency to assume it is not XY problem. Blaming everything to be XY problem is very counterproductive.
    – SergeyA
    Commented Aug 11, 2017 at 15:05

5 Answers 5

27

In order to get

foo<bar1>();

You need template<auto> from C++17. That would look like

int bar1() { return 1; }
double bar2() { return 2.0; }

template<auto function> void foo() { std::cout << function() << "\n"; }

int main()
{
    foo<bar1>();
    foo<bar2>();
}

Which outputs

1
2

Live Example

Before C++17 you have to specify the type as there is no auto deduction of the type of a non type template parameters.

4
  • Thanks a lot, upvoted. But this solution is not practical for me (updated question). Commented Aug 11, 2017 at 14:08
  • @KonstantinVladimirov I saw that. Too bad you can't upgrade. I'm trying to find a different solution Commented Aug 11, 2017 at 14:09
  • @KonstantinVladimirov Sorry but I can't see a way to do this pre C++17 without foo<decltype(bar1()), bar1>(); if you want it done at compile time. Maybe someone else will have something but AFAIK you have to specify the type pre C++17. Commented Aug 11, 2017 at 14:21
  • Yes, I think, that you are right. C++17, runtime argument or preprocessor -- no other ways. Commented Aug 12, 2017 at 8:40
4

So, I'll try to give the best possible answer that I'm aware of in 14. Basically a good approach (IMHO) to this problem is to "lift" the function pointer into a lambda. This allows you to write foo in the much more idiomatic way of accepting a callable:

template <class F>
void foo(F f);

You still get optimal performance, because the type of the lambda is unique, and so it gets inlined. You can more easily use foo with other things though. So now we have to turn our function pointer into a lambda that is hardcoded to call it. The best we can on that front is drawn from this question: Function to Lambda.

template <class T>
struct makeLambdaHelper;

template <class R, class ... Args>
struct makeLambdaHelper<R(*)(Args...)>
{
  template <void(*F)(Args...)>
  static auto make() {
    return [] (Args ... args) {
      return F(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
    };
  }
};

We use it like this:

auto lam = makeLambdaHelper<decltype(&f)>::make<f>();

To avoid having to mention it twice, we can use a macro:

#define FUNC_TO_LAMBDA(f) makeLambdaHelper<decltype(&f)>::make<f>()

You could then do:

foo(FUNC_TO_LAMBDA(bar1)); 

Live example: http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/823c6b6432522b8b

6
  • @skypjack No. I don't understand your argument. It's a specialization for function pointer types. R(*)(Args...) is the type of a function pointer taking Args and returning R. I think you are getting confused with the syntax used by e.g. std::function. I added a live example, so as you can see, it works as is... Commented Aug 11, 2017 at 19:10
  • 2
    Actually I didn't get the whole thing of your answer. It still smells a bit to me, but that's an answer and the OP will judge if it works for the real case. Thank you.
    – skypjack
    Commented Aug 11, 2017 at 20:16
  • Args && ... args is completely broken. Consider int i = 1; void f(int); FUNC_TO_LAMBDA(f)(i);
    – T.C.
    Commented Aug 12, 2017 at 8:32
  • Interesting example, thanks. But lambda helper now seems runtime function argument. I do not want to hope, that inliner will do something, because inlining has its limitations. Commented Aug 12, 2017 at 8:38
  • @T.C. Should it just be Args ... args? I guess the reference-ness will be deduced from the function signature so that will be correct. Commented Aug 12, 2017 at 13:40
2

I am looking for C++14 solution. C++17 appreciated and I upvoted answer with C++17 solution, but project now builds with C++14 and I can not change it in nearest future.

Unfortunately what you ask works starting from C++17.

If you want use the exactly syntax

foo<bar1>();

I don't thinks it's possible in C++14.

But, if you accept a little different syntax... I know that macros are distilled evil but... if you accept to call foo() as

FOO(bar1)();

you can define the macro

#define FOO(f) foo<decltype(f()), f>

A full working example

#include <iostream>

#define FOO(f) foo<decltype(f()), f>

int bar1 ()
 { std::cout << "bar1()" << std::endl; return 0; }

double bar2 ()
 { std::cout << "bar2()" << std::endl; return 1.0; }

template <typename T, T (*f)()>
void foo ()
 { f(); }

int main()
 {
   FOO(bar1)(); // print bar1()
   FOO(bar2)(); // print bar2()
 }
0

OK, so you asked specifically for bar1 and bar2 to be functions, but if you were willing to relax that constraint and instead allow them to be classes having a static member function that implements the desired behavior you could do it in the following way, which doesn't even require C++11 -

struct bar1 {
  static int f() { return 42; }
};

struct bar2 {
  static double f() { return 3.14159; }
};

template<typename bar>
void foo()
{
  double x = bar::f();
  std::cout << x << std::endl;
}

int main(int argc, char* const argv[])
{
  foo<bar1>();
  foo<bar2>();
}
-3

How about this?

template<typename F>
auto foo(F* f)
{
    return f();
}

int bar() { return 1; }

int main()
{
    return foo(bar);
}
1
  • From the question: "P.S. Please do not recommend to accept argument at runtime. I need compile time parametrization with function pointer only." Commented Aug 11, 2017 at 15:16

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