15

I have users which has first_name and last_name fields and i need to do a ruby find all the users that have duplicate accounts based on first and last names. For example i want to have a find that will search through all the other users and find if any have the same name and email. I was thinking a nested loop like this

User.all.each do |user|
 //maybe another loop to search through all the users and maybe if a match occurs put that user in an array
end

Is there a better way

3
  • Are you checking it before saving a new user or you need to find duplicate users?
    – tommasop
    Commented Dec 30, 2010 at 17:21
  • I need to find duplicate users Commented Dec 30, 2010 at 17:23
  • User names are regularly going to have duplicates. If you are using their names to provide unique accounts you'll limit your user base needlessly. Instead, start with their email address, which is going to be unique across the internet. Commented Dec 30, 2010 at 21:14

3 Answers 3

34

You could go a long way toward narrowing down your search by finding out what the duplicated data is in the first place. For example, say you want to find each combination of first name and email that is used more than once.

User.find(:all, :group => [:first, :email], :having => "count(*) > 1" )

That will return an array containing one of each of the duplicated records. From that, say one of the returned users had "Fred" and "[email protected]" then you could search for only Users having those values to find all of the affected users.

The return from that find will be something like the following. Note that the array only contains a single record from each set of duplicated users.

[#<User id: 3, first: "foo", last: "barney", email: "[email protected]", created_at: "2010-12-30 17:14:43", updated_at: "2010-12-30 17:14:43">, 
 #<User id: 5, first: "foo1", last: "baasdasdr", email: "[email protected]", created_at: "2010-12-30 17:20:49", updated_at: "2010-12-30 17:20:49">]

For example, the first element in that array shows one user with "foo" and "[email protected]". The rest of them can be pulled out of the database as needed with a find.

> User.find(:all, :conditions => {:email => "[email protected]", :first => "foo"})
 => [#<User id: 1, first: "foo", last: "bar", email: "[email protected]", created_at: "2010-12-30 17:14:28", updated_at: "2010-12-30 17:14:28">, 
     #<User id: 3, first: "foo", last: "barney", email: "[email protected]", created_at: "2010-12-30 17:14:43", updated_at: "2010-12-30 17:14:43">]

And it also seems like you'll want to add some better validation to your code to prevent duplicates in the future.

Edit:

If you need to use the big hammer of find_by_sql, because Rails 2.2 and earlier didn't support :having with find, the following should work and give you the same array that I described above.

User.find_by_sql("select * from users group by first,email having count(*) > 1")
5
  • 2
    I like your answer but having is only for rails 2.3 and above and the app is 2.2 Commented Dec 30, 2010 at 17:24
  • Hmm, strange. I swear that I've been using :having for years, but my memory may have short circuited. You might have to resort to using find_by_sql and hand-crafting the group / having clauses, but I'll dig a bit for you as well. api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActiveRecord/…
    – jdl
    Commented Dec 30, 2010 at 17:26
  • This is just what I need. How would you do this in mongoid? You can't use group in mongoid and I don't think you can use having either. Hope you can lead me in the right direction. Commented May 24, 2012 at 10:42
  • Won't work in Postgres for me: - PG::GroupingError: ERROR: column "user.id" must appear in the GROUP BY clause or be used in an aggregate function - but as no two records have the same id, including that would defeat the purpose. Or maybe I just don't understand what "or be used in an aggregate function" means in this context.
    – JosephK
    Commented May 26, 2015 at 16:06
  • Are you trying to use one of the queries from above exactly, or is this one of your own? Keep in mind this answer is 5 years and 2 major Rails versions old now.
    – jdl
    Commented May 27, 2015 at 18:49
0

After some googling, I ended up with this:

ActiveRecord::Base.connection.execute(<<-SQL).to_a
  SELECT 
    variants.id, variants.variant_no, variants.state 
  FROM variants INNER JOIN (
    SELECT 
      variant_no, state, COUNT(1) AS count 
    FROM variants
    GROUP BY 
      variant_no, state HAVING COUNT(1) > 1
  ) tt ON 
    variants.variant_no = tt.variant_no 
    AND variants.state IS NOT DISTINCT FROM tt.state;
SQL

Note that part that says IS NOT DISTINCT FROM, this is to help deal with NULL values, which can't be compared with equals sign in postgres.

2
  • What if you want to return the ids of the duplicate records? The answer in the SO post you link to just returns the cominations of name/email that have dupes...ideally I'd return an array of arrays, each array containing the ids of one duplicate group. Commented Jun 23, 2015 at 21:46
  • Yeah, I ended up using custom SQL.
    – hakunin
    Commented Jun 24, 2015 at 3:30
0

If you are going the route of @hakunin and creating a query manually, you may wish to use the following:

ActiveRecord::Base.connection.exec_quey(<<-SQL).to_a
  SELECT 
    variants.id, variants.variant_no, variants.state 
  FROM variants INNER JOIN (
    SELECT 
      variant_no, state, COUNT(1) AS count 
    FROM variants
    GROUP BY 
      variant_no, state HAVING COUNT(1) > 1
  ) tt ON 
    variants.variant_no = tt.variant_no 
    AND variants.state IS NOT DISTINCT FROM tt.state;
SQL

The change is replacing connection.execute(<<-SQL) with connection.exec_query(<<-SQL)

There can be a problem with memory leakage using execute

Plead read Clarify DataBaseStatements#execute to get an in depth understanding of the problem.

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