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I am using the following perl regular expression to clean xml/html style formating tags from input.

$expr = qr{
    <\s*a(?:\s*|\s+[^>]+)>
    ((?:
        (?> (?:(?!(<\s*a(?:\s*|\s+[^>]+)>|<\/\s*a\s*>)).)+ )
      |
        (??{ $expr })
    )*)
    <\/\s*a\s*>
  }x;

Applying it recursively it will remove nested <a>...</a> tags (not that this would make sense if <a> makes a hyperlink) and keep only the bracketed text:

    my $tmp_text = "a<a> e </a>c<a href="test">g <a> d</a> d</a>f";
    print $tmp_text."\n";

    $tmp_text=~s/$expr/$1/g;
    print $tmp_text."\n";

    $tmp_text=~s/$expr/$1/g;
    print $tmp_text."\n";

This will print

    a<a> e </a>c<a href="test">g <a> d</a> d</a>f
    a e cg <a> d</a> df
    a e cg  d df

Now, I would like to do the same with all other formatting tags, like <b>..</b> and so on. I can surely make a list of all supported tags, replace a with b etc. in $expr, and repeat the substitution with each of them.

However, I wonder if there is a more efficient/compact way by modifying $expr such that it will do balanced matching for whatever name is in <name something>...</name>.

Note that I consciously avoid using perl packages for xml/html parsing or cleaning tools. The input I am processing is not strict html and I do not want to include dependencies.

  • 4
    I just have to say this, even as you say "do not want to include dependencies", since I can't stomach that. The very established modules that have been around for decades aren't dependencies. Those are tools you use, to produce better code. (Not to mention the programer's time, the most expensive commodity. Btw, they do handle unclean HTML just fine.) There is absolutely no way that a regex of this complexity is comparably robust and trustworthy to one of those libraries. All this I say with due respect for your preferences and skills (I won't post stuff using those libraries). – zdim Aug 12 '17 at 8:35
  • I agree, but if I do include those "non-dependencies", the people that I am addressing will not use the script I am doing. The xml that I am processing is not just unclean html. It deviates systematically, and I will need to adapt the script correspondingly. – highsciguy Aug 12 '17 at 8:49
  • 2
    OK. But then there are even greater problems. Why do you (or they) have to work with such deviant data format, and why is such unreasonable position the norm? What if you had to work with a database -- no DBI? What if you had to process complex date-time problems -- no modules? May strict be used? Again, I don't mean to assault you here, but this is a recurring discussion, repeating itself faithfully over years. It's just unreasonable. Good luck. – zdim Aug 12 '17 at 9:21
  • Let us keep it down to earth. I am writing a specific quick-and-dirty script for specific purposes that is to be used by a few people who will consider it only if it comes with few or no dependencies. If I would use a package, I would need to customize it. The problem I described is a specific question about Perl regular expressions and marked as such. Even if there are different solutions that do not directly involve the use of regular expressions, I think that the question is valid as such. – highsciguy Aug 12 '17 at 19:31
  • I think this will work in Perl, too. – Wiktor Stribiżew Aug 12 '17 at 20:05
2

I believe this meets your stated requirements:

I replaced the 'a' in the regex with a [a-z]+, captured and backreferenced it. That does mean you have to change your line applying it to replace with $2 instead.

If you wanted to make a list of accepted tags ( which still seems better to me, but I do not know your use case ), you could replace the [a-z]+ with, for example, a list of acceptable tags joined by |.

$expr = qr{
    <\s*([a-z]+)(?:\s*|\s+[^>]+)>
    ((?:
        (?> (?:(?!(<\s*\1(?:\s*|\s+[^>]+)>|<\/\s*\1\s*>)).)+ )
      |
        (??{ $expr })
    )*)
    <\/\s*\1\s*>
  }x;

A short example script with a tag:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $expr;

$expr = qr{
    <\s*([a-z]+)(?:\s*|\s+[^>]+)>
    ((?:
        (?> (?:(?!(<\s*\1(?:\s*|\s+[^>]+)>|<\/\s*\1\s*>)).)+ )
      |
        (??{ $expr })
    )*)
    <\/\s*\1\s*>
  }x;


my $tmp_text = 'a<b> e </b>c<b href="test">g <b> d</b> d</b>f';
print $tmp_text."\n";

print $tmp_text."\n" while $tmp_text =~s/$expr/$2/g;

Wiktor has posted a regex in comments which also allows for capital letters and '_' - if that is what you want, just replace [a-z] with [a-zA-Z_] as in his example.

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