The goal is to extract rows from a dataframe/data.table which have:

  • same values in two or more fields (here NAME and DOB); but
  • different values in another field (here ID)

Currently I'm doing this:

library(data.table)

# load the data
customers <- structure(list(
  NAME = c("GEETA SHYAM RAO", "B V RAMANA", "GONTU VENKATARAMANAIAH", 
           "DAMAT RAMAKRISHNA", "MARIAM SUDHAKAR", "VELPURI LAKSHMI SUJATHA", 
           "MOHAMMED LIYAKHAT ALI", "VENKATESHWARAN PONNAMBALAM",
           "DEVARAKONDA SATISH BABU", "GEEDI RAMULU", "KANDU OBULESU",
           "J PARVATHALU(TEMP.SUB-STAFF)", "DOKKA RAJESH", "G TULASIRAM REDDY",
           "MALLELA CHIRANJEEVI", "MANEPALLI VENKATA RAVAMMA", 
           "DOKKA JAGADEESHWAR", "K KRISHNA", "B SUDARSHAN", "B ANNAPURNA", 
           "CHAVVA SHIVA RAMULU", "BIKASH BAHADUR CHITRE", "DARBAR ASHOK", 
           "VEMULAPALLY SANGAMESHWAR RAO", "MOHAMMED ABDUL HAKEEM ANWAR", 
           "MANEPALLI SHIV SHANKAR RAO", "MOHD MISKEEN MOHIUDDIN",
           "KOTLA CHENNAMMA", "NAYAK SURYAKANTH", "GOPIREDDY INDIRA", 
           "MEKALA SREEDEVI", "K KRISHNA", "B V RAMANA", "KUMMARI VENKATESHAM",
           "BHAVANI CONSRUCTIONS", "UPPUTHOLLA KOTAIAH", "YEDIDHA NIRMALA DEVI",
           "MARIAM SUDHAKAR", "B ANNAPURNA", "VELPURI LAKSHMI SUJATHA",
           "DARBAR ASHOK", "AMMANA VISHNU VARDHAN REDDY", "ZAITOON BEE",
           "MOHD CHAND PASHA", "PALERELLA RAMESH", "GEEDI SRINIVAS", 
           "RAMAIAH SADU", "BIMAN BALAIAH", "KOTLA CHENNAMMA", 
           "VENKATESHWARAN PONNAMBALAM"), 
  DOB = c("13-02-1971", "15-01-1960", "01-07-1970", "10-03-1977", 
          "24-01-1954", "28-06-1971", "26-01-1980", "14-04-1969", "23-09-1978", 
          "15-08-1954", "09-10-1984", "20-02-1975", "29-09-1984", "03-03-1975", 
          "26-01-1979", "01-01-1964", "21-01-1954", "01-05-1964", "12-03-1975", 
          "12-12-1962", "10-03-1982", "14-05-1983", "03-01-1950", "04-03-1962", 
          "12-05-1966", "01-06-1960", "10-03-1964", "15-07-1958", "26-06-1979", 
          "02-04-1974", "10-01-1975", "01-05-1964", "15-01-1960", "08-08-1977", 
          NA, "05-04-1981", "29-08-1971", "24-01-1954", "12-12-1962",
          "28-06-1971", "03-01-1950", "23-06-1970", "20-02-1960", "05-07-1975",
          "10-01-1979", "31-08-1982", "10-08-1983", "10-03-1964", 
          "15-07-1958", "14-04-1969"), 
  ID = c(502969, 502902, 502985, 502981, 502475, 502267, 502976, 
         502272, 502977, 502973, 502986, 502978, 502989, 502998, 502967, 
         502971, 502988, 502737, 502995, 502878, 502972, 502984, 502639, 
         502968, 502975, 502970, 502997, 502466, 502991, 502982, 502980, 
         502737, 502902, 502999, 502994, 502987, 502990, 502047, 502877, 
         502251, 502548, 502992, 503000, 502993, 502983, 502974, 502996, 
         502979, 502467, 502290),
  PIN = c(500082, 500032, 500032, 500032, 
          500032, 500084, 500032, 500032, 500032, 500032, 500032, 500084, 
          500032, 500084, 500084, 500032, 5e+05, 500050, 500032, 500084, 
          500032, 500032, 500032, 500050, 500032, 500032, 500045, 500032, 
          500084, 500032, 500032, 500084, 500035, 500084, 500032, 500032, 
          500032, 500032, 500084, 500032, 500084, 500033, 500084, 500032, 
          500032, 500032, 500084, 500032, 500032, 500032)),
  .Names = c("NAME", "DOB", "ID", "PIN"), 
  class = c("data.table", "data.frame"), row.names = c(NA,-50L))

Checkout the data:

dim(customers)
#[1] 50  4

head(customers)
                      NAME        DOB     ID    PIN
#1:         GEETA SHYAM RAO 13-02-1971 502969 500082
#2:              B V RAMANA 15-01-1960 502902 500032
#3:  GONTU VENKATARAMANAIAH 01-07-1970 502985 500032
#4:       DAMAT RAMAKRISHNA 10-03-1977 502981 500032
#5:         MARIAM SUDHAKAR 24-01-1954 502475 500032
#6: VELPURI LAKSHMI SUJATHA 28-06-1971 502267 500084

Step1: Get rows with same values in NAME and DOB columns -

dup1 <- customers[, .(ID, PIN, .N), keyby=.(NAME, DOB)][N>1][, -"N"]
dup1
#                          NAME        DOB     ID    PIN
# 1:                B ANNAPURNA 12-12-1962 502878 500084
# 2:                B ANNAPURNA 12-12-1962 502877 500084
# 3:                 B V RAMANA 15-01-1960 502902 500032
# 4:                 B V RAMANA 15-01-1960 502902 500035
# 5:               DARBAR ASHOK 03-01-1950 502639 500032
# 6:               DARBAR ASHOK 03-01-1950 502548 500084
# 7:                  K KRISHNA 01-05-1964 502737 500050
# 8:                  K KRISHNA 01-05-1964 502737 500084
# 9:            KOTLA CHENNAMMA 15-07-1958 502466 500032
#10:            KOTLA CHENNAMMA 15-07-1958 502467 500032
#11:            MARIAM SUDHAKAR 24-01-1954 502475 500032
#12:            MARIAM SUDHAKAR 24-01-1954 502047 500032
#13:    VELPURI LAKSHMI SUJATHA 28-06-1971 502267 500084
#14:    VELPURI LAKSHMI SUJATHA 28-06-1971 502251 500032
#15: VENKATESHWARAN PONNAMBALAM 14-04-1969 502272 500032
#16: VENKATESHWARAN PONNAMBALAM 14-04-1969 502290 500032

In the above result, the ID values of "B V RAMANA" and "K KRISHNA" are same in their duplicate rows and therefore need to be removed.

Step 2: Get rows with same values in NAME, DOB and ID columns -

dup2 <- dup1[, .(PIN, .N), keyby=.(NAME, DOB, ID)][N>1][, -"N"]
dup2
#         NAME        DOB     ID    PIN
#1: B V RAMANA 15-01-1960 502902 500032
#2: B V RAMANA 15-01-1960 502902 500035
#3:  K KRISHNA 01-05-1964 502737 500050
#4:  K KRISHNA 01-05-1964 502737 500084

Step 3: Now remove rows in Step 2 from rows in Step 1 to get the final result -

result <- fsetdiff(dup1, dup2)
result
#                          NAME        DOB     ID    PIN
# 1:                B ANNAPURNA 12-12-1962 502878 500084
# 2:                B ANNAPURNA 12-12-1962 502877 500084
# 3:               DARBAR ASHOK 03-01-1950 502639 500032
# 4:               DARBAR ASHOK 03-01-1950 502548 500084
# 5:            KOTLA CHENNAMMA 15-07-1958 502466 500032
# 6:            KOTLA CHENNAMMA 15-07-1958 502467 500032
# 7:            MARIAM SUDHAKAR 24-01-1954 502475 500032
# 8:            MARIAM SUDHAKAR 24-01-1954 502047 500032
# 9:    VELPURI LAKSHMI SUJATHA 28-06-1971 502267 500084
#10:    VELPURI LAKSHMI SUJATHA 28-06-1971 502251 500032
#11: VENKATESHWARAN PONNAMBALAM 14-04-1969 502272 500032
#12: VENKATESHWARAN PONNAMBALAM 14-04-1969 502290 500032

In every case above, the NAME and DOB columns have duplicate values but the values in ID column for those duplicate rows are necessarily different.

That's three lines of processing code for getting the result but I'm sure there must be alternative methods. In this example, there are just four fields. With say, more than 50 fields it would be a tedious job to put all the field names in code even with copy-paste. Therefore, it would be really cool to create a re-usable function which could take as input -

  • a dataframe/data.table
  • a vector of just the fieldnames which must contain duplicate values
  • a single fieldname which must contain different values

and output the result as a dataframe/data.table. Ideas please.

Side note: This feature is deemed so important in fraud analytics that a commercial software "CaseWare IDEA" offers it by the name "Duplicate Key Exclusion". Checkout this feature in action: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqL4j8UXsKw

  • 1
    "In every case above, the NAME and DOB columns have duplicate values but the values in ID column for those duplicate rows are necessarily different." -- This is not a necessary consequence of your two steps. A group with ID = A A B would lose the two As and retain the B. You should really be filtering with a condition like .N > 1L && uniqueN(ID) > 1L, I guess. Also, the fact that you always have exactly two dupes is curious... if that's a condition that you know holds in your data, the best answer will be different, I guess. – Frank Aug 13 '17 at 5:00
  • @Frank: "A group with ID = A A B would lose the two As and retain the B". Since the ultimate goal is to detect whether a customer has been issued multiple IDs, I think you've caught something very serious. Your final solution down below is the only data.table solution that deals with this situation, with one little modification. I've modified the dataset there to show the solution dealing with this case. – San Aug 13 '17 at 13:22
  • Thanks for the edit; glad it still works in that case. – Frank Aug 13 '17 at 13:47
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think the OP's way is very good already. However, ...

  • With j = .N on its own, it will be more efficient. See ?GForce for details.
  • I think the OP's two steps do not succeed in the "duplicate key exclusion" task described in the OP and linked video:

    In every case above, the NAME and DOB columns have duplicate values but the values in ID column for those duplicate rows are necessarily different.

For the OP's two steps, there's...

bycols = c("NAME", "DOB")
dcol = "ID"

cols = c(bycols, dcol)

w1 = customers[customers[, .N, by=bycols][N > 1L, !"N"], on=bycols, which=TRUE]
customers[w1][!customers[w1, .N, by=cols][N > 1L, !"N"], on=cols]

For the quoted task ...

mDT = customers[!duplicated(customers, by=cols), .N, by=bycols][N > 1L]
customers[mDT[, !"N"], on=bycols]

Either way for the OP's example, we get

                          NAME        DOB     ID    PIN
 1:            MARIAM SUDHAKAR 24-01-1954 502475 500032
 2:            MARIAM SUDHAKAR 24-01-1954 502047 500032
 3:    VELPURI LAKSHMI SUJATHA 28-06-1971 502267 500084
 4:    VELPURI LAKSHMI SUJATHA 28-06-1971 502251 500032
 5: VENKATESHWARAN PONNAMBALAM 14-04-1969 502272 500032
 6: VENKATESHWARAN PONNAMBALAM 14-04-1969 502290 500032
 7:                B ANNAPURNA 12-12-1962 502878 500084
 8:                B ANNAPURNA 12-12-1962 502877 500084
 9:               DARBAR ASHOK 03-01-1950 502639 500032
10:               DARBAR ASHOK 03-01-1950 502548 500084
11:            KOTLA CHENNAMMA 15-07-1958 502466 500032
12:            KOTLA CHENNAMMA 15-07-1958 502467 500032

mDT is a summary table describing the duplicates, convenient for browsing:

> mDT
                         NAME        DOB N
1:            MARIAM SUDHAKAR 24-01-1954 2
2:    VELPURI LAKSHMI SUJATHA 28-06-1971 2
3: VENKATESHWARAN PONNAMBALAM 14-04-1969 2
4:                B ANNAPURNA 12-12-1962 2
5:               DARBAR ASHOK 03-01-1950 2
6:            KOTLA CHENNAMMA 15-07-1958 2

Edited by __San__ (Original Poster):

Dataset modified to show how to deal with the case pointed out earlier by Frank: "A group with ID = A A B would lose the two As and retain the B"

library(data.table)

# load the data
customers <- structure(list(
  NAME = c("GEETA SHYAM RAO", "B V RAMANA", "GONTU VENKATARAMANAIAH", 
           "DAMAT RAMAKRISHNA", "MARIAM SUDHAKAR", "VELPURI LAKSHMI SUJATHA", 
           "MOHAMMED LIYAKHAT ALI", "VENKATESHWARAN PONNAMBALAM", 
           "DEVARAKONDA SATISH BABU", "GEEDI RAMULU", "KANDU OBULESU",
           "B V RAMANA", "DOKKA RAJESH", "G TULASIRAM REDDY", 
           "MALLELA CHIRANJEEVI", "MANEPALLI VENKATA RAVAMMA", 
           "DOKKA JAGADEESHWAR", "K KRISHNA", "B SUDARSHAN", "B ANNAPURNA", 
           "CHAVVA SHIVA RAMULU", "BIKASH BAHADUR CHITRE", "DARBAR ASHOK", 
           "VEMULAPALLY SANGAMESHWAR RAO", "MOHAMMED ABDUL HAKEEM ANWAR", 
           "MANEPALLI SHIV SHANKAR RAO", "MOHD MISKEEN MOHIUDDIN",
           "KOTLA CHENNAMMA", "NAYAK SURYAKANTH", "GOPIREDDY INDIRA", 
           "MEKALA SREEDEVI", "K KRISHNA", "B V RAMANA", 
           "KUMMARI VENKATESHAM", "BHAVANI CONSRUCTIONS", 
           "UPPUTHOLLA KOTAIAH", "YEDIDHA NIRMALA DEVI", "MARIAM SUDHAKAR", 
           "B ANNAPURNA", "VELPURI LAKSHMI SUJATHA", "DARBAR ASHOK", 
           "AMMANA VISHNU VARDHAN REDDY", "ZAITOON BEE", "MOHD CHAND PASHA",
           "PALERELLA RAMESH", "GEEDI SRINIVAS", "RAMAIAH SADU",
           "BIMAN BALAIAH", "KOTLA CHENNAMMA", "VENKATESHWARAN PONNAMBALAM"),
  DOB = c("13-02-1971", "15-01-1960", "01-07-1970", "10-03-1977", 
          "24-01-1954", "28-06-1971", "26-01-1980", "14-04-1969", 
          "23-09-1978", "15-08-1954", "09-10-1984", "15-01-1960", 
          "29-09-1984", "03-03-1975", "26-01-1979", "01-01-1964", 
          "21-01-1954", "01-05-1964", "12-03-1975", "12-12-1962", 
          "10-03-1982", "14-05-1983", "03-01-1950", "04-03-1962", 
          "12-05-1966", "01-06-1960", "10-03-1964", "15-07-1958", 
          "26-06-1979", "02-04-1974", "10-01-1975", "01-05-1964",
          "15-01-1960", "08-08-1977", NA, "05-04-1981", "29-08-1971",
          "24-01-1954", "12-12-1962", "28-06-1971", "03-01-1950",
          "23-06-1970", "20-02-1960", "05-07-1975", "10-01-1979", 
          "31-08-1982", "10-08-1983", "10-03-1964", "15-07-1958",
          "14-04-1969"),
  ID = c(502969, 502902, 502985, 502981, 502475, 502267, 502976, 
         502272, 502977, 502973, 502986, 502910, 502989, 502998, 502967, 
         502971, 502988, 502737, 502995, 502878, 502972, 502984, 502639, 
         502968, 502975, 502970, 502997, 502466, 502991, 502982, 502980, 
         502737, 502902, 502999, 502994, 502987, 502990, 502047, 502877, 
         502251, 502548, 502992, 503000, 502993, 502983, 502974, 502996, 
         502979, 502467, 502290), 
  PIN = c(500082, 500032, 500032, 500032, 500032, 500084, 500032, 500032,
          500032, 500032, 500032, 500033, 500032, 500084, 500084, 500032,
          5e+05, 500050, 500032, 500084, 500032, 500032, 500032, 500050,
          500032, 500032, 500045, 500032, 500084, 500032, 500032, 500084,
          500035, 500084, 500032, 500032, 500032, 500032, 500084, 500032,
          500084, 500033, 500084, 500032, 500032, 500032, 500084, 500032,
          500032, 500032)),
  .Names = c("NAME", "DOB", "ID", "PIN"),
  row.names = c(NA, -50L), class = c("data.table", "data.frame"))

# define function for duplicate key exclusion
dupKeyEx <- function(DT, dup_cols, unique_cols) {
  cols <-  c(dup_cols, unique_cols)
  mDT <-  DT[!duplicated(DT, by=cols), .N, by=dup_cols][N > 1L]
  ans <- unique(DT[mDT[, !"N"], on=dup_cols], by=cols)
  return(ans)
}

# call function
result <- dupKeyEx(customers, c("NAME", "DOB"), "ID")
result

The result tells us that B V RAMANA (same NAME and DOB) has been issued multiple IDs and shows those different IDs as under:

                          NAME        DOB     ID    PIN
 1:                B ANNAPURNA 12-12-1962 502877 500084
 2:                B ANNAPURNA 12-12-1962 502878 500084
 3:                 B V RAMANA 15-01-1960 502902 500032
 4:                 B V RAMANA 15-01-1960 502910 500033
 5:               DARBAR ASHOK 03-01-1950 502548 500084
 6:               DARBAR ASHOK 03-01-1950 502639 500032
 7:            KOTLA CHENNAMMA 15-07-1958 502466 500032
 8:            KOTLA CHENNAMMA 15-07-1958 502467 500032
 9:            MARIAM SUDHAKAR 24-01-1954 502047 500032
10:            MARIAM SUDHAKAR 24-01-1954 502475 500032
11:    VELPURI LAKSHMI SUJATHA 28-06-1971 502251 500032
12:    VELPURI LAKSHMI SUJATHA 28-06-1971 502267 500084
13: VENKATESHWARAN PONNAMBALAM 14-04-1969 502272 500032
14: VENKATESHWARAN PONNAMBALAM 14-04-1969 502290 500032

If the OP method is used with this modified dataset, two rows with identical ID's of B V RAMANA are lost and the result will show just one (out of total three) IDs issued to B V RAMANA because with that method "a group with ID = A A B would lose the two As and retain the B" (to quote Frank). Same applies to the other data.table solution by Uwe Block. The result which does not serve the purpose is shown below.

                          NAME        DOB     ID    PIN
 1:                B ANNAPURNA 12-12-1962 502878 500084
 2:                B ANNAPURNA 12-12-1962 502877 500084
 3:                 B V RAMANA 15-01-1960 502910 500033
 4:               DARBAR ASHOK 03-01-1950 502639 500032
 5:               DARBAR ASHOK 03-01-1950 502548 500084
 6:            KOTLA CHENNAMMA 15-07-1958 502466 500032
 7:            KOTLA CHENNAMMA 15-07-1958 502467 500032
 8:            MARIAM SUDHAKAR 24-01-1954 502475 500032
 9:            MARIAM SUDHAKAR 24-01-1954 502047 500032
10:    VELPURI LAKSHMI SUJATHA 28-06-1971 502267 500084
11:    VELPURI LAKSHMI SUJATHA 28-06-1971 502251 500032
12: VENKATESHWARAN PONNAMBALAM 14-04-1969 502272 500032
13: VENKATESHWARAN PONNAMBALAM 14-04-1969 502290 500032

Till someone thinks of a situation where the new method fails, I think we have got a correct solution for "duplicate key exclusion". Great catch and data.table solution by Frank.


For an extension to cover the case where values mismatch due to leading or trailing spaces, see the OP's follow-up at How to refer to multiple column names held in a variable inside a function, which uses stringr::str_trim() and concludes:

dupKeyEx <- function(DT, dup_cols, unique_cols) {
  cols <-  c(dup_cols, unique_cols)
  chr_cols <- cols[sapply(DT[, ..cols], is.character)]
  DT[, (chr_cols) := lapply(.SD, stringr::str_trim), .SDcols=chr_cols]
  mDT <-  DT[!duplicated(DT, by=cols), .N, by=dup_cols][N > 1L]
  ans <- unique(DT[mDT[, !"N"], on=dup_cols], by=cols)
  setorderv(ans, c(dup_cols, unique_cols))
  return(ans)
}

The OP has already given a data.table solution in his question. However, here is an improved version:

library(data.table)

# define column names to check 
dup_cols <- c("NAME", "DOB")
unique_cols <- "ID"

# set sort order for convience and easy comparison of result
# note that this doesn't copy the data
setorderv(customers, dupe_cols)

# extract rows which are duplicates in dup_cols but unique in unique_cols
customers[(duplicated(customers, by = dup_cols) | 
            duplicated(customers, by = dup_cols, fromLast = TRUE)) &
            !(duplicated(customers, by =c(dup_cols, unique_cols)) | 
                duplicated(customers, by = c(dup_cols, unique_cols), fromLast = TRUE))]
                          NAME        DOB     ID    PIN
 1:                B ANNAPURNA 12-12-1962 502878 500084
 2:                B ANNAPURNA 12-12-1962 502877 500084
 3:               DARBAR ASHOK 03-01-1950 502639 500032
 4:               DARBAR ASHOK 03-01-1950 502548 500084
 5:            KOTLA CHENNAMMA 15-07-1958 502466 500032
 6:            KOTLA CHENNAMMA 15-07-1958 502467 500032
 7:            MARIAM SUDHAKAR 24-01-1954 502475 500032
 8:            MARIAM SUDHAKAR 24-01-1954 502047 500032
 9:    VELPURI LAKSHMI SUJATHA 28-06-1971 502267 500084
10:    VELPURI LAKSHMI SUJATHA 28-06-1971 502251 500032
11: VENKATESHWARAN PONNAMBALAM 14-04-1969 502272 500032
12: VENKATESHWARAN PONNAMBALAM 14-04-1969 502290 500032

This can be wrapped in a function as requested:

# define function
filter_dupes <- function(DT, dup_cols, unique_cols) {
  DT[(duplicated(DT, by = dup_cols) | 
        duplicated(DT, by = dup_cols, fromLast = TRUE)) &
       !(duplicated(DT, by =c(dup_cols, unique_cols)) | 
           duplicated(DT, by = c(dup_cols, unique_cols), fromLast = TRUE))]
}

# call function
result <- filter_dupes(customers, c("NAME", "DOB"), "ID")
result

returning the same result as above.

Note that the input data.table customers already had been sorted using

setorderv(customers, dupe_cols)

above and so is the result. You can set the sort order of result also afterwards by, e.g.,

setorderv(result, c(dup_cols, unique_cols))
result

Explanation

duplicated() returns a logical vector indicating which rows of a data.table are duplicates of a row with smaller subscripts. So,

customers[duplicated(customers, by = dup_cols)]

would only return the 2nd (and subsequent if any) occurence of any duplicate entry. Therefore, duplicated() is called a second time but now looking from the reverse side:

customers[duplicated(customers, by = dup_cols) | 
            duplicated(customers, by = dup_cols, fromLast = TRUE)]

Note that the solution is taken from Finding ALL duplicate rows, including “elements with smaller subscripts”.

This exercise is repeated to find all rows which have duplicate values in the combined set of columns given by dup_cols and unique_cols to identify the rows to be omitted from the result. Instead of fsetdiff() logical operators are used.

Note that unique_cols may contain more than one column name.

Function definition with check of parameters

Functions used for production codes always should check their arguments. Here is a version with checks included:

filter_dupes <- function(DT, dup_cols, unique_cols) {
  checkmate::assert_data_table(DT)
  checkmate::assert_character(dup_cols, min.len = 1L, any.missing = FALSE)
  checkmate::assert_character(unique_cols, min.len = 1L, any.missing = FALSE)
  checkmate::assert_subset(dup_cols, names(DT))
  checkmate::assert_subset(unique_cols, names(DT))
  # verify that column names are disjoint (although error message isn't self-explanatory)
  checkmate::assert_set_equal(dup_cols, setdiff(dup_cols, unique_cols))
  DT[(duplicated(DT, by = dup_cols) | 
        duplicated(DT, by = dup_cols, fromLast = TRUE)) &
       !(duplicated(DT, by =c(dup_cols, unique_cols)) | 
           duplicated(DT, by = c(dup_cols, unique_cols), fromLast = TRUE))]
}
  • @San I picked up your proposed change only in parts because sorting the result shouldn't be part of the filter_dupes() function. – Uwe Aug 13 '17 at 5:15
  • It's an awesome data.table solution. I assigned the operation to ans and then added return(ans[order(get(dup_cols), get(unique_cols))]) to return the answer because sorting really helps a lot with my original large table that I'm working on. – San Aug 13 '17 at 5:42
  • 1
    @San Use setorderv(ans, c(dup_cols, unique_cols)) instead. – Frank Aug 13 '17 at 5:43
  • @Frank: Your suggested alternative code is brief and works fine. Thanks. – San Aug 13 '17 at 5:48
  • @San See ?setorderv and the data.table intro materials (vignettes etc, noted in a message when you load up the package) regarding modifying tables by reference. The difference is pretty much about saving resources by not making a copy of the table. – Frank Aug 13 '17 at 5:51

Here you go.

process.df <- function(df, duplic.vars, differ.var) {
  df <- as.data.frame(df)
  # 
  part0 <- df[, duplic.vars]
  DUPLI <- sapply(1:nrow(part0), (function(i){
    tmp <- part0[i,]
    chk01 <-sapply(1:length(duplic.vars), (function(j){
      as.vector(part0[,duplic.vars[j]]) %in% as.vector(tmp[j])
    }))
    chk01 <- apply(chk01, 1, sum) == length(duplic.vars)
    sum(chk01) >= 2 # eventually, customize
  }))
  #
  new.df <- df[DUPLI,]
  #
  new.df <- new.df[-which(new.df[,differ.var] %in% 
                           new.df[,differ.var][duplicated(new.df[,differ.var])]), ]
  #
  # return
  return(new.df)
}

res <- process.df(customers, duplic.vars = c("NAME", "DOB"), differ.var = "ID")
res[order(res[,1]),]
  • Edit: This method also suffers from the following fault pointed out by @Frank "A group with ID = A A B would lose the two As and retain the B". – San Aug 13 '17 at 14:24

I've written a function which follows the basic ideas outlined in your question.

It finds all the unique IDs there are for each person (in this case NAME and DOB). Function arguments person and ID specify which columns to use.

my_idea <- function(df, person, ID) {

  # Count number of entries per person
  df$count <- 1
  entries <- aggregate(df["count"], by=df[person], FUN=sum)

  # Only consider people with multiple entries
  entries <- entries[entries$count > 1, person]
  df <- merge(df, entries)

  # Get rid of all rows where any 'person' and 'ID' columns are duplicated
  df <- df[!(duplicated(df[c(person, ID)]) | duplicated(df[c(person, ID)], fromLast=T)), ]

  return(df[, -match("count", names(df))])
}

my_idea(df=customers, person=c("NAME", "DOB"), ID="ID")
  • I originally misunderstood desired output and thought you wanted to keep one row from each name/dob/id in step 3. I've edited the code, adding the extra duplicated clause. – hodgenovice Aug 13 '17 at 8:25
  • Edit: This method also suffers from the following fault pointed out by @Frank "A group with ID = A A B would lose the two As and retain the B". – San Aug 13 '17 at 14:26
  • Yes, that's a fair point. I didn't realise you didn't want that, but the last part could always be changed to follow the same sort of method as was done to ensure multiple 'person' entries. Thanks for the feedback though. – hodgenovice Aug 13 '17 at 14:52

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