Let's assume the following function:

def myfun(my_list, n, par1=''):
    if par1 == '':
        new_list = [[my_fun2(i,j) for j in range(n)] for i in range(n)]
    else:
        new_list = [[my_fun2(i,j) for j in range(n)] for i in range(n) if my_fun2(i,n) == par1]
    return new_list

As you can see, there are two different scenarios depending on par1. I do not like that line 3 and line 5 are almost identical and do not follow the DRY (Don't Repeat Yourself) principle. How can this code be improved?

  • Check my answer, I don't have your exact functions so it's hard to test it in the same environment, but I reckon it should do the trick – dheiberg Aug 14 '17 at 11:33
  • It would be nice to understand what you actually try to solve. – ferdy Aug 14 '17 at 11:43
up vote 8 down vote accepted

This might work:

new_list = [[my_fun2(i,j) for j in range(n)] for i in range(n) if par1 == '' or my_fun2(i,n) == par1]

So used like this:

def myfun(my_list, n, par1=''):
    return [
               [my_fun2(i,j) for j in range(n)]
               for i in range(n) if par1 == '' or my_fun2(i,n) == par1
           ]
  • You could also merge the return into line 2, but thats up to you really – dheiberg Aug 14 '17 at 11:26
  • 1
    Despite this is a possible solution, I think that the readability is not quite good, so it's missing the "readability counts" rule of the zen of python. IMHO the cascaded list comprehension should be split up. – ferdy Aug 14 '17 at 11:51
  • Minor note: You don't need the backslashes inside comprehensions (or within parenthesis) :) – MSeifert Aug 14 '17 at 12:30
  • 1
    Thank you! That's exactly what I need. It turns out that it is more a logical operator problem than list comprehensions :) Just a little note, I see that if n is pretty big then the solution is not so great since we check par1 == '' at every step. – Trarbish Aug 14 '17 at 15:53

You could choose the condition function dynamically by using a function that just returns True in the first case and one that actually compares the my_fun2 result with par1 in the second case:

def myfun(my_list, n, par1=''):
    if par1 == '':
        cond = lambda x, y: True
    else:
        cond = lambda i, n: my_fun2(i, n) == par1
    return [[my_fun2(i,j) for j in range(n)] for i in range(n) if cond(i,n)]

Or by replacing the outer loop with a generator expression in case par1 isn't an empty string:

def myfun(my_list, n, par1=''):
    if par1 == '':
        outer = range(n)
    else:
        # a conditional generator expression
        outer = (i for i in range(n) if my_fun2(i,n) == par1)
    return [[my_fun2(i,j) for j in range(n)] for i in outer]

However don't let DRY make the function harder to read, maintain or debug. I, personally, think that your approach is fine (and probably faster) and you probably shouldn't change anything.

  • 2
    Thank you, yes, I agree. There is a fine line between DRY and readability. – Trarbish Aug 14 '17 at 16:00
  • @Trarbish well, it's also a question about performance (not only about readability). Your approach will be faster than my generator expression approach (which is probably the fastest not DRY approach mentioned here). – MSeifert Aug 14 '17 at 16:04

why not use a filter ?

from operator import eq
def myfun(my_list, n, par1=''):
    new_list = ([my_fun2(i,j) for j in range(n)] for i in range(n))
    if par1 != '':
        new_list = filter(eq(par1),new_list)
    return list(new_list)
  • 1
    I understand that for the future and Python3, list comprehensions are a better way to go over the alternative of using map, filter and reduce. – madtyn Aug 18 '17 at 12:14
  • Filter in python 3 creates a generator, that is why the return value is surrounded with a list() – Uri Goren Aug 18 '17 at 13:26

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